ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 11, 2016 by

Networking benefits entry-level candidates

Handshake between a man and a woman photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In their search for entry-level jobs, college students and recent graduates should not assume all employment opportunities are made public. Sometimes, there are opportunities available they can’t find in the newspaper or even online. Students and graduates should talk to people (including their families and friends) about the type of jobs they are looking for. This is part of professional networking. Networking is an opportunity for job seekers to engage in meaningful conversation advancing their careers.

While much of this conversation today happens online, meeting recruiters, hiring managers, or other professionals in person should not be forgotten. Speaking with recruiters, talent acquisition leaders, and hiring managers face-to-face can benefit college students and recent graduates when searching for entry-level jobs. By introducing themselves in person, students and grads can learn more about potential employers, which can help them stand out from the competition. Karen A. Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC, shares advice on networking concerning entry-level candidates.

· “If students want to set themselves apart, I want to meet them in person! I can, probably, already find them online.

· This generation already has a bad reputation for being too “connected.” Get out and see and talk to people.

· The workplace is about face-to-face connections (even in a virtual workspace), so demonstrate you can present yourself in that environment.”

Need more networking advice? Click on our blog, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young is the award-winning Founder and President of HR Resolutions, a full-service human resources management company. She has over 25 years of experience in personnel and human resources, as well as being recognized by the HR Certification Institute as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and the Society for Human Resource Management as an SHRM-SCP. Karen has worked with numerous organizations to improve workplace environments, lower HR costs, and increase the bottom line.

Posted May 26, 2016 by

5 common onboarding mistakes employers make

Businesswoman dissatisfied with subordinate's behavior photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The onboarding process should be a positive and productive experience for new employees. Employers who succeed during this process benefit in the short-term and long-term with satisfied employees who can help achieve company goals. However, if onboarding is done incorrectly, new hires won’t likely be effective for companies. Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co., shares five common onboarding mistakes made by employers.

1. Treating everybody the same. It’s important to have a process or checklist. Just don’t try to standardize it. Tailor what you do to the candidates you’re hiring. If new hires have accolades in sales, don’t put them through a sales training program.

2. Waiting periods for benefits. There’s nothing to gain by withholding vacation days, health care, etc. Waiting periods connote cheapskate and/or creates mistrust. If you don’t trust new employees enough to give them benefits on day one, why are you hiring them?

3. Not training new employees. Just throwing them to the wolves and of course, firing them when they don’t perform up to your expectations. The same expectations you never made clear.

4. Not including new hires in the process of assessing what they want/need to learn. Force feeding training and then throwing employees to the wolves.

5. Not learning from new hires. Assuming learning is a one-way road. There are plenty of candidates you might hire that have more to teach you, than you have to teach them.”

Looking for help with your onboarding process? Check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co.

Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co.

Wes Higbee helps organizations make the leap from today to tomorrow. Wes’s career has been a journey. He started out in software development helping organizations tackle business opportunities. In working closely with customers as a consultant, he realized there are many needs beyond the software itself that nobody was taking care of. Those are the needs he addresses today, whether or not technology is involved.

Along the journey, Wes has had a passion for sharing knowledge. He’s been a speaker at countless local groups, community organizations, webinars, and conferences. He speaks professionally to help organizations improve.

Posted July 08, 2015 by

Want a Promotion? 5 Tips to Help You Earn One

Do you believe it is time for you to get promoted at work?  If you have been with a company for a while and have proven your worth, then chances are you are probably right.  You may have even asked your boss for a promotion before, but for some reason it was not the right time.  That does not mean you should give up.  If your goal is to move up within your business, there are ways to do it.  Here are some tips to help you earn a promotion. (more…)

Posted September 18, 2014 by

College Students, Want to Enhance Your Networking Skills When Searching for Jobs? Here’s What You Should Do

For college students trying to improve their networking skills when searching for jobs, the following post offers some helpful advice to take them to the next level.

Networking as a job search strategy creates a great deal of angst. For many, it’s just plain uncomfortable to introduce yourself to strangers and strike up conversations in the hopes of uncovering job leads. But that’s putting the horse before the cart. The first hurdle is simply finding new people to add to your network, according to job

Originally from:

Continue Reading

Posted September 12, 2014 by

Trying to Close Your Cover Letters for Entry Level Jobs? 5 Powerful Conclusions

When writing cover letters for entry level jobs, be sure to finish them by leaving a lasting impression.  Here are five powerful conclusions for your cover letters in the following post.

Writing a cover letter pretty much sucks. The content, tone and length all have to be just right. And even when a job seeker gets it just right, there are those who say, “No one reads a cover letter anymore… stop wasting your time!” Here’s the truth: in many companies, cover

Taken from:

Continue Reading

Posted September 09, 2014 by

Will You Find an Internship that Leads to a New Job Opportunity?

What are the chances that you find an internship that will turn into a new job?  The following post features an infographic that may tell you.

According to a study by NACE, internship to job conversion has risen to 51.2 percent. So, your internship is more likely to turn into a full-time job now, right? Well, maybe. This interactive infographic depicts data from a new LinkedIn study about the correlation between students who do internships and how often those internships turn into full-time jobs

Link:

Continue Reading

Posted September 08, 2014 by

Searching for Entry Level Jobs? 10 Words You Should Not Use in Your Job Search

For people searching for entry level jobs, make sure you’re careful of the language you use.  Learn 10 words not to use for your job search in the following post.

Imagine you’ve found the job of your dreams. You tailored your cover letter and resume perfectly. Your application was impeccable. The phone rings. An interview! You do all the right research. You prepare all the right answers, and questions. Your dress is perfectly aligned with the culture. You nailed it! After the interview, however: weeks go by and

View original article:

Continue Reading

Posted August 29, 2014 by

Recruiters, Should Veterans Preference Hiring Laws be More Clear?

For recruiters who are looking to help companies find qualified veterans for employment, would it be beneficial for Congress to clear up veterans preference hiring laws?  Learn more in the following post.

A new report from the Merit Systems Protection Board says that it’s time for Congress to simplify the overly complex veterans preference laws to make sure they’re doing what Congress put them in place to do.

Excerpt from –

Continue Reading

Posted August 28, 2014 by

Finding Entry Level Jobs with Job Titles You Don’t Understand? How to Find Out What They Actually Mean

When looking at entry level jobs, you may find some job titles that are hard to understand.  In the following post, learn how to get the meaning of these creative titles.

Accounting ninja. Conversation architect. Social media unicorn. What in the world are employers thinking with these job titles? The reality is that employers are getting more creative with their hiring processes. Whether it’s asking job seekers to jump through hoops during the application process or simply listing an opening with an outrageous title, understanding what

More:

Continue Reading

Posted August 25, 2014 by

Looking for an Entry Level Job with a Company Culture You Believe In? Consider Working for These 25 Employers

If company culture is important to you in your entry level job search, then you may be interested in working for one of these 25 employers in the following post.

So you’re looking for a job, right? But you don’t just want any old job. Your dream job needs to pay well, have great perks, and embrace a company culture you can identify with. Essentially, you’d like to be happy in your job and you don’t think that’s too much to ask. According

More:

Continue Reading