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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 11, 2016 by

LinkedIn tip #5: Rich media content

What is rich media content, and will sharing it on your LinkedIn profile really help you in your job search?

This article and video, featuring expert Chaim Shapiro, will answer that question.

Over the next two weeks, College Recruiter is publishing 10 LinkedIn tips. Today’s video, tip #5, is hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter. Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College and social media consultant, offers college students, recent graduates, and other job seekers tips about including rich media content in their LinkedIn profiles.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Chaim Shapiro encourages LinkedIn users to add rich media content, including hyperlinks to published content on websites, slideshares of PowerPoint presentations, documents such as resumes, and YouTube videos to their LinkedIn profiles. Whatever claims LinkedIn users make in the summary section of their profiles, they should back up with rich media content.

Shapiro reminds users that other LinkedIn connections will only be able to view the top five items of rich media content in the summary section unless they click “see more”; users can choose which five are presented at the top of the summary section and should think strategically about placement.

For more of Chaim Shapiro’s top 10 LinkedIn tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube channel and follow College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

Posted December 16, 2011 by

Videos and PowerPoints From FedCollege Recruiting Conferences on 12/7 and 12/8/2011

On April 1, 2011, Steve Tiufekchiev of RECSOLU and I co-organized the first FedCollege recruiting conference for federal, state, and local government employees who were involved in the hiring of college students for internships and recent graduates for entry-level jobs and other career opportunities. The conference was at The George Washington University’s Marvin Center in Washington, D.C.

Partnering with RECSOLU on this non-profit venture was a natural as Steve and I work well together and RECSOLU’s services are quite complimentary to the job postings, targeted emails, banner advertising, targeted cell phone text messaging, and other job board services sold by CollegeRecruiter.com. RECSOLU is a leading recruiting software, solutions, and services company, whose clients include more than 100 major corporations. Their packaged solutions enable their clients to achieve their college recruiting goals more effectively, with less staff time, greater efficiency, greater accuracy, and less cost.

We had hoped for 50 attendees to the April conference and were pretty happy when we ended up with 72 attendees. It was apparent to us that we should host another but we didn’t want to end up with even more attendees so we split the conference into two days with corporate and non-profit employer representatives scheduled for Wednesday, December 7th and government employer representatives scheduled for Thursday, December 8th. It was a good thing that we split the conference into two as we ended up with over 80 attendees between the two days. The smaller number of attendees per day really paid off as the sessions became more interactive than they would have been in larger rooms and attendees were able to meet and visit with each other much more easily. (more…)