• Ask Matt: How recent college grads can benefit from joining professional associations

    November 18, 2016 by

    Networking2Dear Matt: I’m a recent college graduate who is seeking opportunities to grow and network within my field. I’ve always heard that professional associations are beneficial. Why should recent college grads join professional/industry associations?

    Matt: Joining an industry-related association or trade organization, or young professionals networking organization, are great ways for recent college graduates to network, meet other like-minded professionals, and learn. Many recent college grads have met professionals who have become future co-workers, managers, and even friends, through associations or various professional networking organizations.

    But meeting people and making contacts and friends are only a small reason why joining industry associations are highly recommended for college students and recent college grads.

    “Recent graduates benefit immensely from joining professional associations – and there’s much more to it than networking for job opportunities or brushing up on your interviewing skills,” says Richard Baseil, executive director of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the world’s premier association for signal processing engineers and industry professionals.

    Joining professional associations allows college students and recent college graduates to stay on top of industry trends, learn about volunteer or leadership opportunities, and enables project collaboration. For example, IEEE’s Signal Processing Society offers current students and recent graduates exclusive member benefits including continuing education, substantial discounts on various technical and industry resources, and career recognition through scholarships and awards.  And, since most employees do not stay with a single employer through their career, an association such as IEEE can act as a stable “home base” as members seek other opportunities.

    Employers like employees who step outside their comfort zone Continue Reading

  • How traveling abroad after college can help you land your first job [infographic]

    October 31, 2016 by

     

    Are you thinking about traveling abroad after college, but you worry about entering the working world one year later? Don’t worry! In fact, traveling the world will help you acquire some very necessary skills to get your first job. While having fun and exploring new cultures, you will learn things you wouldn’t otherwise. And when you are back from your adventures, you can make travel look good on your resume and in an interview. Here are six ways to take advantage of your traveling experiences and stay on track to launch your career:

    1. Take time to reflect

    Knowing what you want to do straight after graduation can be quite challenging. Before making this important decision, it may be beneficial to take some time off to travel abroad and analyze the future of your career from a different perspective. Traveling will give you the chance to disconnect from your daily routine and have time for yourself to consider the different options.

    2. Volunteer

    If you have just finished college, you may not have any working experience yet. But that is not a problem! You can do some volunteering work while traveling; it will be easier than you think. You can choose some fantastic volunteering programs at GoAbroad.com based on the country you want to visit, the causes you care about and the duration you have in mind.

    Volunteering abroad will look exceptional on your resume and will help you to stand out from the competition. Employers will highly value your commitment, responsibility, and devotion.

    3. Grasp a new language

    Being able to communicate with international business is increasingly important in the workforce. Speaking a second language will broaden up your career prospects, and it may impact your overall earnings. In the United States, Spanish is the second most-spoken language, and it may help you not only to get a job in the customer service industry but also in many B2B career opportunities. Furthermore, languages like Mandarin and Arabic are becoming extremely useful in international business, and there is a lack of Americans who are bilingual in these two languages.

    There are different ways you can learn a new language while traveling abroad after college. Some suggestions are: attend a short course in your destination country, enroll in an online language course, stay with a local host, chat to locals, read the papers, watch original version films with subtitles and download the dictionary app that best works for you. Even if you don’t become fluent in a new language, you will learn the basics, and that effort and knowledge are valued by hiring managers. Include your language skills on your resume to show you are a curious person, always trying to learn more and go the extra mile.


    TIP: Make sure to supplement your online job search with networking. Once you get guidance from your network, target your online search to the right job titles and companies. After you apply, follow up with someone who works there. College Recruiter lists thousands of entry-level job opportunities. Would it make sense to start searching?


    4. Build organizational skills

    Traveling, just like business, requires a lot of organization. You will gain a set of skills that you will find highly useful later on in your career, including:

    • Managing budgets like a pro. If you run out of money too soon, your adventure is over!
    • Becoming more adaptable and flexible. If your original plans change, you need to be prepared for what is next.
    • Getting better and faster at problem-solving. If you get lost, for example, you may need to be able to read a complex map or get instructions and follow them correctly.
    • Being responsible for your own decisions. When you are on the road, you are constantly making decisions that will affect your travels. If for instance, you decide to take a bus instead of a train and it takes longer than expected, you will have less time to spend at your destination.

    Overall, you will return from your adventure being a more mature and experienced person.

    5. International networking

    Take this opportunity to meet as many people as you can. Engaging with people from other cultures and backgrounds will enrich you as a person and will help you see life from different angles. Talk to locals and other travelers; you may find people abroad who are interested in your industry, and you never know who will recommend you in the future or where will you meet your next employer! Connecting with them on social media networks may be a good idea to stay in touch in the future.

    6. Start a blog

    Starting your own travel blog is the best way to put together your traveling experiences and tell the world. The benefits of starting a blog while traveling are endless: improve your writing skills, get better at photography and video, learn about online marketing, social media management, search engine optimization, develop relationships with other bloggers and so on.

    All the abilities acquired creating a blog will help you land your first job even if it is in a completely different area. Your blogging capabilities will make you better at communicating, working faster and being more efficient. All appreciated skills for any job position.

    If you are still in two minds about traveling abroad after college, talk to other people you know who have done it before. You will find out that nobody regrets having such a profound experience.

    This infographic comes from Essay Writing Service UK:

    Traveling after college is a viable option

    Maria Onzainmaria-onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food. Connect with Maria on LinkedIn

     

     

     

    Want more job search and career advice? Stay connected with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube

  • Affinity groups: value to employee and employer

    October 26, 2016 by

    Group of different birdsAt a recent People of Color Job Fair, employers touted their welcoming workplaces. Many referred to their affinity groups as how they are inclusive of diversity. If offered genuinely, affinity groups can bring value to both the employee and the employer.

    Value to employees

    1. Take a rest from the code-switching. It can be lonely working in an office full of people who don’t look like you. Code-switching all day can be exhausting. (For those less familiar, “code-switching” is a daily practice for people who navigate two cultures. They adjust their dialect/language/mannerisms to fit into the surrounding culture without being questioned. NPR has a nice illustration of code-switching.) Affinity groups can offer relief for anyone who needs a space where it feels safer to express yourself freely. Groups are meant to bring people together who share a common interest or culture. Examples are veterans, women, African Americans and GLBT affinity groups. It’s about solidarity (“Why Women’s Spaces Matter”).
    2. Build your network. In your affinity group, you will probably find yourself networking with colleagues outside your immediate team. This can be helpful to your career. Especially for entry-level and younger employees, more experienced colleagues can give you advice and point you to resources.
    3. Build new skills. You don’t have to wait for a formal company training to learn new skills. Informal group discussions offer excellent opportunities to learn new tools, technology or best practices that can make you more effective and valuable at your company.

    Value to employer

    1. Boost retention of employees. Engagement is king. For those who claim that affinity groups look more like segregation than inclusion, consider how relieving it can feel for an employee to join an affinity group and feel at home with other colleagues who “get them.” That employee, in turn, may feel more positive about her work, thus stick around longer. In addition, group members can collaborate with management to discuss issues of recruitment and retention, and shed light on how to improve your practices. In this example, GLBT employees helped shape their organization’s benefit policy for domestic partnerships, making them more competitive.
    2. Get new consumer insights. Affinity groups can collaborate with management to discuss marketing solutions for consumers from their own community.
    3. Low-cost learning and development. Affinity group members share resources with each other, best practices, and new tools and technology. This no-cost informal learning is a nice supplement to expensive formal company training.
    4. Reap the benefits of diversity. Multiple studies point to the increased productivity and profits of diverse companies. However, if your work environment isn’t inclusive, these benefits remain out of reach. If managed well, affinity groups can be part of your inclusion strategy.

    Doing it right

    1. You can’t force affinity groups. They must be employee-led, and membership can’t be forced. If employees feel that the group has been too packaged without their input, you lose their buy-in and engagement.
    2. Give it time. The longer your organization has affinity groups, the more likely you will be able to align them to business goals.

    Veteran’s Day is November 11! Here are a few companies who have created affinity groups for veteransWant to keep up on the latest career and job search tips and trends for recent college grads? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Ask Matt: Recent college grads shouldn’t let helicopter parents hinder their job search

    October 12, 2016 by
    Helicopter parents in the job search; Tips for recent college grads

    Photo from StockUnlimited.com

    Dear Matt: I’m responsible for hiring entry-level employees for a large company, and I am amazed at how many recent college grads have their parents reaching out to us on behalf of their children – they even show up at interviews! I thought helicopter parents were only involved at the youth and high school level. But we’re now seeing it in the business world. Can you remind your readers and all recent college grads that parental involvement shouldn’t take place in the workplace?

    Matt: By one definition, a helicopter parent is a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child’s or children’s experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Helicopter parents are also prevalent at the youth and high school level, often hovering over their children and every decision involving those children at youth or high school activities, in school, or with friends.

    And now, helicopter parents are invading the workplace. Yikes! It’s true.

    “Believe it or not, recruiters and hiring managers are seeing a surprising influx of parental involvement in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process,” says Brandi Britton, district president for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. “As a staffing firm, we’ve heard our share of helicopter parent stories and experienced some unique situations with moms and dads ourselves.”

    Today’s working parent can be a great resource for that recent college grad seeking job search advice, or with connecting them to members of their professional network. But they shouldn’t accompany their child to job interviews, contact employers on behalf of their child, or listen in on speaker phone or Skype/Facetime during the interview. Those are all things that are happening today and all things recent college grads should be sure to avoid to land that first job, or move forward in their career.

    According to a survey of 608 senior managers by Office Team, 35 percent of senior managers interviewed said they find it annoying when helicopter parents are involved in their kids’ search for work. Another one-third (34 percent) of respondents prefer mom and dad stay out of the job hunt, but would let it slide. Only 29 percent said this parental guidance is not a problem.

    The reasons for mom and dad getting involved are simple, says Britton: Recent college grads may not have as much job search experience and therefore turn to their parents for guidance.

    “The job search process can be extremely challenging and daunting,” says Britton. “Parental support and advice throughout the process can help you stay positive and on track.”

    But…

    “Although most parents mean well with their efforts, they need to know where to draw the line to avoid hurting their son or daughter’s chances of securing a job,” says Britton

    Managers were also asked to recount the most unusual or surprising behavior they’ve heard of or seen from helicopter parents of job seekers. Here are some of their responses:

    • “The candidate opened his laptop and had his mother Skype in for the interview.”
    • “A woman brought a cake to try to convince us to hire her daughter.”
    • “One parent asked if she could do the interview for her child because he had somewhere else to be.”
    • “A father asked us to pay his son a higher salary.”
    • “One mom knocked on the office door during an interview and asked if she could sit in.”
    • “Parents have arrived with their child’s resume and tried to convince us to hire him or her.”
    • “A job seeker was texting his parent the questions I was asking during the interview and waiting for a response.”
    • “Once a father called us pretending he was from the candidate’s previous company and offered praise for his son.”
    • “Parents have followed up to ask how their child’s interview went.”
    • “A father started filling out a job application on behalf of his kid.”
    • “I had one mother call and set up an interview for her son.”
    • “Moms and dads have called to ask why their child didn’t get hired.”

    When it comes to parental involvement in the job search, Britton provided the five biggest mistakes college grads make when involving parents in the job search:

    1. Parents should avoid direct contact with potential employers. They should not participate in interviews or call, email or visit companies on behalf of their children.
    2. Job seekers should be the ones filling out the applications and submitting resumes, not their parents.
    3. Helicopter parents should steer clear of involvement in following up after their child has applied or interviewed for a position.
    4. Having your mom or dad try to bribe a potential employer is a definite no-no. In our survey, one woman brought a cake to a company to try to convince them to hire her daughter.
    5. Parents shouldn’t be involved in job offer discussions, such as negotiating salary or benefits.

    “Parents should absolutely not be included in their children’s job interviews,” says Britton. “The meeting is meant to be a discussion involving only the interviewer(s) and job candidate. “Parents participating in interviews can distract from the goal of making sure it’s a fit for the applicant and employer. The employer is evaluating whether to hire the applicant — not his or her parent.”

    Employers usually appreciate candidates who are assertive, but when a parent is clearly handholding or answering questions for their child, it sends the message that the individual lacks initiative and independence, adds Britton.

    Does this automatically eliminate a candidate?

    “Not all employers will automatically take a candidate out of contention if his or her parents become too involved in the job search, but chances are that most hiring managers would be put off by this type of behavior,” says Britton. “Parents who become overly involved in their children’s job searches can cause more harm than good because employers may question the applicant’s abilities and maturity.”

    Professionals need to take ownership of their careers – they’re responsible for applying to and ultimately landing positions. So how can parents assist recent college grads in the job search? Britton offered these additional tips on how parents can assist recent college grads in the job search:

    1. Uncovering hidden job opportunities: Family members and others in your network can be great sources for advice and help you uncover hidden job opportunities.
    2. Job search and interview preparation: It’s perfectly fine to tap your parents for behind-the-scenes assistance, such as reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews or offering networking contacts.
    3. Access to professional contacts: Parents or those in their network can provide access to contacts at companies or alert you to opportunities.
    4. Resume and cover letter review: Have your mom or dad review your resume and cover letter to ensure they’re error-free and clearly showcase the most important information.
    5. Mock interview assistance: Prepare for interviews by practicing responses to common (and tricky) questions with your parents. They can also provide constructive criticism regarding your answers and delivery.
    6. Decision-making: Juggling a few offers? Children may want to get their parents’ opinions when weighing potential opportunities. But ultimately, it’s the job seekers decision, not the parents.

    “Parents want the best for their kids, but being overly involved in a child’s job search can cause more harm than good,” says Britton. “It’s a positive for mom and dad to help behind the scenes by reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews and offering networking contacts. However, ultimately, companies seek employees who display self-sufficiency and maturity.”

    Want more tips and advice on how to successfully navigate the job search? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

    Matt Krumrie

    Matt Krumrie

    About Ask Matt on CollegeRecruiter.com
    Ask Matt is a new monthly career advice column that offers tips and advice to recent college grads and entry-level job seekers. Have a question? Need job search or career advice? Email your question to Matt Krumrie for use in a future column.

  • Are you wasting millions on your on-campus recruiting approach? It’s possible.

    September 21, 2016 by
    Ted Bauer

    Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

    By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

    This headline from October 2015 in Harvard Business Review says it all: “Firms are wasting millions recruiting on only a few college campuses.”

    We’ve seen this for years, especially among the EPS companies across investment banks, management consulting firms, and law firms. There are “target” campuses and then there’s “everyone else.” While you might get some amazingly high-quality people (good!), overall the process has a lot of waste, financially and in terms of potential burnout for your recruiting team.

    There’s a better way. Ever seen the stat that it took 35 years to construct the federal highway system, but Facebook reached 500 million users in six years? It’s an obvious stat, sure — but it speaks to the amazing power of digital to both connect and scale.

    No matter how you approach digital vs. in-person, your goal should be to maximize your ROI from your college recruiting efforts. To do that, you might need to move around some budget buckets: less on-campus and more interactive/digital/social/job board work.

     

  • 10 tips for college grads who complete an internship without a job offer

    September 06, 2016 by
    Person pointing at job search

    Person pointing at job search. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Many recent college graduates head into a summer internship hoping they secure full-time employment with that company once the internship is completed. But, for a variety of reasons, it doesn’t always work out that way.

    Now what? How do recent college graduates and entry-level job seekers move forward in the job search when they don’t secure a full-time job from an internship?

    With confidence, because they just gained the invaluable on-the-job training employers covet.

    Because, for recent college graduates, the number one goal of any internship should be to gain work experience in a professional business setting, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates, and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs.

    While larger companies tend use their internship programs as a way to evaluate interns for employment in a subsequent year, small and medium employers are more likely to hire interns to accomplish specific goals, like completing a well-defined project or to cover staff for the summer vacation season, says LaBombard. Not getting hired full-time is in no way indicative of an interns performance on the job.

    “Either way, internships are a great way for students to apply their skills in meaningful work, and learn how to receive feedback and apply coaching tips from supervisors,” says LaBombard. “Even if an internship does not result in a full-time job offer, the experience should help interns better define their value proposition to employers by gaining a more focused appreciation for the core skills they possess, and how they have been successfully applied in the workplace.”

    So what should job seekers who completed an internship without a full-time job do next? Start by registering as a job seeker with College Recruiter. We’ll send you new job leads tailored to your interests and preferences and save you the trouble of searching for them on a regular basis.

    Next, consider these tips from Bill Driscoll, district president for Accountemps, and Tel Ganesan, Board Chairman of Kyyba, Inc., a global IT, engineering and professional staff augmentation company, and Managing Partner of Kyyba Ventures. Both have experience working with recent college graduates who have completed internship programs. They help answer the question:

    My internship is over, now what:

    1. Be flexible: College graduates looking to land their first jobs need to be flexible, proactive and creative. Consider volunteer assignments or temporary work as a way to continue to gain additional experience and build your skill set, says Driscoll.

    2. Network: Online and off. Many companies don’t advertise open positions, so networking plays an important role in finding out about hidden job opportunities. “Tell everyone you know that you are looking for a job, whether in-person at industry association events, or using professional networking websites,” says Driscoll. “You’d be surprised at who might be able to help.”

    3. Use college career center/alumni resources: College career centers usually welcome recent grads and can help in your job search. You also might be able to connect with other alumni who can provide advice. These resources are often underutilized by recent college grads who don’t go back to their college/alumni career center seeking assistance. They are ready to help you – even now that you graduated. Learn more about how to use your college career center in the job search.

    4. Don’t overlook your online image: Applicants need to actively monitor and maintain their professional reputations online. Keep a clean online profile. Future employers are watching.

    5. Initiate contact: Research companies you would like to work for and ask for an informational interview to learn more about the organization. “It also can help employers get to know you so you’re top of mind when that company has a vacant position,” says Driscoll.

    6. Meet with a recruiter: Staffing executives can be your eyes and ears in the job market. Recruiters also provide useful feedback on your resume and interview skills, and help you locate full-time and temporary jobs.

    7. Ask for references: Before your last day, ask your manager, and/or co-workers if they will be references. Professional references can sometimes hold more value than a supervisor from a work study program, or college professor (but those are both viable references if need be).

    8. Update your cover letter and resume: Did you track your achievements and successes at the internship? Be sure to update this information on your resume and put it at the top of your resume, right under education. “Highlight any unique activities you partook in that may set you apart from the competition,” says Ganesan. Include project work and results, being a part of a team, technical/computer skills learned/used, and any other success story.

    9. Apply for more than a handful of ideal jobs: Set target companies or jobs, but be flexible in your search. “Consider numerous possibilities, especially when you’re just starting off,” says Ganesan.

    10. Use your social network: Use your social media network, as well as family and friends, to find a personal connection at particular companies. “That individual may be able to assist in securing an interview or simply provide advice and insight into the organization,” says Ganesan.

    Don’t view the completion of an internship without a job as the end. View it as a new start, and a new beginning to a job search that is now backed by real world internship experience – something every employer craves.

    For more tips on how to secure a job after your internship is completed, and other job search and career advice, visit our blog and connect with us on LinkedInTwitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

  • Biggest networking mistake you can make

    August 26, 2016 by
    Asking photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    For many college students and recent graduates, networking is likely to be part of their job searches. Their success or failure when interacting with recruiters and hiring managers will depend on their approach. While securing internships or entry-level jobs is a priority, college students and recent grads don’t want to come off as too aggressive when asking about career opportunities. Job seekers should not assume that just because they are eager to work that employers will automatically tell them about job opportunities, including those in the hidden job market.

    When networking, students and graduates can inform professionals about who they are and what interests they have. At the same time, they can ask questions to learn more about potential employers and what they have to offer. Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, discusses a key mistake to avoid when networking and shares helpful tips for a better experience.

    “The biggest networking mistake is asking people if they know of any open jobs. It’s good to be aggressive and show you’re looking for work. But why should anyone recommend you, especially if they don’t know you or your work ethic?

    The best way to network is showing curiosity about what people do. Ask them and tell them you’d like to learn more about their profession; establish an interest in them. They may recommend you and say “This person is interested in…and may be good for the position.” Asking employers if they’re hiring won’t be as effective as “Hey, what do you do?” Avoid that mistake and you’ll be better at networking.”

    Want to improve your networking skills? Visit our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

    Marc Prosser, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business

    Marc Prosser is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Fit Small Business, a site that provides reviews and articles for small business owners. Prior to starting Fit Small Business, Marc was the CMO of FXCM for 10 years. He joined as FXCM’s first employee and grew the company to more than 700 employees.

  • Recruiters’ failure to follow-up hurts networking

    August 22, 2016 by
    Emotional stress, frustration, telephone photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Attending networking events on college campuses is a great way for recruiters and hiring managers to interact with and build relationships with college students. By engaging in conversations with college students, recruiters and hiring managers can find potential candidates for entry-level jobs, internships, or other career opportunities. It is also important to keep in mind that networking is a two-way street. While it is important for students to follow-up with recruiters, recruiters should do the same.

    One mistake some recruiters make is not following up during the hiring process. This can not only create a less impressive candidate experience but can also a company or organization’s reputation. Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), discusses the negative effect left on college students when recruiters do not follow up during the hiring process.

    “The single biggest mistake we often see recruiters and hiring managers make during the hiring process is a lack of follow-up or follow-through. College students will come to us and say ‘I never heard back from (recruiter) at (name of company) – Should I follow up with them?’ This lack of following through on communicating with students is damaging to an organization’s brand, and it leaves them with an unfavorable view of the organization. It especially does when you consider the contact management software available today.”

    For more advice on networking, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

    Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

    Kevin Fallon serves as the Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), where he leads the delivery of career and professional development services to more than 8,000 students enrolled in, as well as alumni from 42 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs in business, education, science and technology, and the liberal arts. Prior to joining Salisbury, Fallon’s 22-year career included talent acquisition and talent development leadership roles with global Fortune organizations such as PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Accenture, and Bank of America, as well as university career services leadership roles with the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland College Park and Rider University in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

  • Networking isn’t all about you

    August 19, 2016 by
    Business photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    How do you handle networking opportunities? Is it a one-way or a two-way street? The mistake you can easily make is that networking is all about you. Because you’re so focused on landing an internship or an entry-level job, no one else seems to matter. Having that perspective is a mistake.

    Networking is about communicating with professionals or other job seekers and building relationships with them. If you’re not just talking but taking the time to listen to someone else, you can learn valuable information to benefit your career. Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, explains why networking isn’t all about you and offers good networking tips.

    “We live in a culture obsessed with personal branding, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The problem occurs when the only thing professionals focus on is themselves. Don’t attend networking events to tell your story alone; focus on listening, as well. After all, networking should be a dialogue, not a monologue.

    It all comes down to authenticity. Are you joining professional groups and meeting people to only serve your career and to be the loudest, most talkative person in the room? If so, you will get nowhere fast.

    Show a genuine interest in meeting new people, sharing ideas, asking questions, and developing strong relationships. Nobody wants to associate with selfish, egotistical blowhards who try controlling every conversation.

    Being authentic also requires gratitude. Many young professionals forget to thank whoever takes time to talk to them. Express how much you appreciate each person’s time and energy. This leaves them with a positive impression of you and solves another common networking mistake, which is failing to follow-up.

    Most people assume their contacts will seek them out on their own. Don’t leave it to chance. Instead, be proactive, and connect online and schedule follow ups with a simple email or a request for a lunch meeting. Take charge, be humble, and maintain a level of professionalism.”

    Find more networking advice on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

    Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

    Michael Moradian is the Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, an honor society that recognizes academic achievement and provides valuable resources and tools to its members. Connect with Michael and HonorSociety.org on Twitter at @HonorSocietyorg.

  • Why building great relationships with career services benefits employers

    August 18, 2016 by
    Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

    Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

    Employers and career services offices/college campuses each play important roles in the lives of college students and recent graduates. Employers can provide entry-level jobs and internship opportunities to students and graduates; the former can be their first real jobs and the latter offer them valuable work experience preparing them for those first real jobs. Career services offices and campuses guide college students not just academically but professionally also. Career services professionals can help with various parts of the job search such as writing resumes and cover letters, interview preparation, and networking. While recruiters are partners for employers in finding young, top talent to fill job openings, they are often not the only ones.

    Building great relationships with career service offices and campuses is a smart move for employers, recruiters, and hiring managers. If companies know the type of job candidates they need, and colleges have them, then it’s a win-win for both sides. Employers gain access to communicate directly with qualified candidates, and career services offices and campuses connect college students and recent graduates with internship and job opportunities. Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean for Career and Professional Development at Whittier College, highlights her school’s relationship with Peace Corps.

    “There are several employers who come to mind that have built great working relationships with Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development (CCPD), but the stand-out employer for the CCPD team is the Peace Corps.

    Peace Corps has a terrific talent acquisition approach which appeals to students and emerging professionals. Nick Leichliter and Tiffany Tai, the Peace Corps recruiters assigned to Whittier College, partnered with us to design customized on-campus recruiting sessions. The Peace Corps recruiting sessions included two employer meet-and-greet roundtables, coffee talks, one hiking session (with a Peace Corps dog), and two classroom presentations. Nick and Tiffany also provided one-on-one coaching to Whittier College students offering our students tips to succeed with the intensive Peace Corps application process. Peace Corps extra efforts paid off, and the organization received a record amount of resumes and attention at the annual Career and Internship Fair.

    Our partnership with Peace Corps continues to deepen. The CCPD’s goal for this year is to establish the Peace Corps Prep certificate under the auspices of the Whittier College Early Talent Identification Program.”

    Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean of Whittier College's Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development

    Deborah Pratt, Assistant Dean of Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development

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    Assistant Dean Deborah Pratt leads a dynamic team of career development professionals at Whittier College’s Weingart Center for Career and Professional Development. In this role, she drives the strategic vision and blueprint for the college to transition from a traditional career services business operation to a four-year career development college-wide approach and program.