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Posted July 22, 2016 by

8 tips for beginners in career services

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Beginning a new career is a challenge, no matter the field.  It is logical, then, to view starting a new job in career services as borderline daunting.  Landing a career where you help others develop their own careers?  Yikes!  But don’t sweat it.  If you’re a newbie to career services, take a deep breath and check out these helpful tips from someone who has recently stood in your shoes.

 

That’s right.  I’m right there with you.  I have logged less than a year in career services – 10 months, actually – and I can tell you that it’s taken each day in those ten months for me to develop a clear picture of how I’d like the services this office provides to look in three years.  I’ve also come to realize that to remain effective and relevant, this office can’t stay the same forever but must change with the times and the students who walk through its doors.  I’ve learned so much in the last 10 months, and I’m content knowing that I have much more to learn and more opportunities to pursue within this office.  That being said, here are eight necessities I’ve embraced in taking on my new role in career services.  Good luck to you, and pay close attention to number one.
1) Get excited! I mean it! Get. Excited. This is an amazing, dynamic field where each day you’ll have clients leaving your office happier than when they arrived and where your colleagues are always looking forward. Hope abounds. Potential is realized. You’re part of one of the most important services a college campus can provide, in my opinion, because you help the future drivers of our economy and leaders of our workforce develop the skills they’ll need to succeed in life beyond college. What an awesome space to occupy!

2) Know your history. If you’re coming into a position previously occupied by another individual, be sure to network with that individual to determine the direction of the career center up to the point of your arrival – including the career center’s current strengths, challenges, and opportunities. Read last year’s annual report as well as those from two-three years prior. Knowing where you’re coming from helps you develop a map for where you’re trying to go.

3) Know your target audience. This is perhaps the key to effective operation of a career center. Whether you serve Millennials, non-traditional students, students of a particular academic background, or any other group, knowledge of your target audience is an integral factor in developing student programming, opportunities, marketing efforts, and career coaching practices. A resource I’ve enjoyed for learning more about Millennials (my primary target audience) is Lindsey Pollak’s book, Becoming the Boss, though I’ve also learned from her presentations at the Kennan Summit 2015 and the NACE Conference keynote address.

It’s important to note that there are more factors in identifying your target audience than generational attributes alone. For example, what percent of your students are first-generation? How many receive financial aid? How many are international students? How many are business majors? How many are from the state in which your institution operates? How have these things influenced your students’ career development thus far? All of these factors and more will help you create a clear picture of the human beings you’re going to help and how best to help them.

4) Inventory your resources. Any good carpenter can tell you what tools he/she has, what they’re used for, and how to access them. The same can be said of any good career services professional. Upon entering your new role, you’ll want to ascertain what tools you already have at your disposal – a website? Social media accounts? Job boards? Support staff? Professional memberships? Established student programming events? How about colleagues in other departments with whom you can potentially collaborate on future planning or programming?

This is something your predecessor can really help you with, but keep in mind that he/she is not your only resource. Support staff is always an EXCELLENT resource, particularly if they’ve been around a while. I am very lucky, for instance, to have come into a position where just 20 feet away sits the kindest, most professional administrative coordinator who has worked for the college for many years. Her knowledge of program and general institutional history comes in handy daily, and she is a wonderful sounding board.

Make yourself a list of resources such as those listed above. Go through existing files on the network drives to which you have access. Once you determine what you have, you’re able to decide what you need.

5) Prepare to partner. Career services professionals absolutely must partner with other departments on campus. Neglecting to do so will prohibit optimization of career center programming. In other words, you’ll be missing out, big time, and as a result, the students you’re hired to serve will as well. Collaboration spreads the workload and allows for use of resources your little office will not have on its own.

Partnering is an expectation and, in my opinion, a gift. Embrace it. And keep in mind that partnering isn’t limited to institutional departments. While it’s great to partner with faculty, for example, to market a career fair to students, it’s also excellent to partner with student organizations to boost participation in career center programming. For example, before that very same career fair, you could partner with Greek Life to host an interactive workshop where students prepare for the fair. You’re effectively providing programming for a large, “captive audience,” while at the same time bolstering attendance for your upcoming fair. Plus, your visible connection with this group will encourage other student organizations to partner with your office, thereby boosting your reach. I could go on and on about partnering. Don’t limit your work to the confines of your office! Get out there, and I can promise you, you’ll be happy and effective!

6) Attend a professional conference. The best ideas are often those you learn from colleagues, but your prospects are limited on campus. Professional conferences, such as the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) conference, allow for a meeting of the minds, where career services staff and professionals from the working world can share best practices, trends, and ideas. I attended the NACE conference in June and came home with ideas for events, new partnerships, assessment and reporting techniques, and several new contacts – including employers and other career services professionals with invaluable knowledge and expertise. State and regional-level professional conferences are wonderful resources as well. Look online to find appropriate events for you.

7) Build your network(s). For a career services office to function successfully, the staff must have connections with employers, volunteer services organizations, graduate and professional school reps, other career services professionals – the list goes on. You want to develop a list of contacts you can access and refer to easily throughout your day. If this doesn’t exist upon your arrival, its development will be one of your top three priorities. You’ll refer to this document when you send invitations and save-the-dates for major events, such as career fairs, grad school expos, and student/alumni networking events.

The key to harnessing the power of these connections is getting started. Create a LinkedIn account, if you don’t have one, and begin connecting with company recruiters, career services professionals, and your institution’s alumni group. If you’re like me and are the sole career services professional for your office, consider forming a board of advisors with ten or so alums and professionals whose networks and influence can help you locate campus speakers, boost alumni support of career development efforts, and discover new career opportunities for current students. Remember that your network isn’t limited to you. You have access to your colleagues’ connections as well as the ones you forge yourself. Many times asking for help or advice is the best way to establish a connection, so don’t be afraid to reach out.

8) Keep records and get creative in reporting them. Most career services offices already keep track of how their programming is operating – how many students they reach, what the students are saying about their services, what types of services are used by which students, etc.; but this isn’t enough. Prospective students and their families want to see how your institution’s students are faring in the “real world” before making the financial commitment to attend. Along the same line, prospective donors and business partners like to see the impact of their donations of time and treasure. For these reasons, it’s imperative that career services professionals track current students’ and graduates’ experiential learning achievements and post-grad destinations (their first job or where they go to graduate or professional school) and share that information with other departments on campus. If your office isn’t currently pursuing this data, this is an effort you’ll want to initiate.

Annette Castleberry, Co-Director of Career Services at Lyon College

Annette Castleberry, Co-Director of Career Services at Lyon College

For more great tips for building your career services program, follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

About the author, guest writer Annette Castleberry:

Currently Co-Director of Career Services, Annette Castleberry is excited to be promoted to Director of Career Development at Lyon College beginning August 1, 2016.  You can connect with Annette and with the Lyon College Career Center on Facebook or www.lyon.edu.  

 

 

Posted May 04, 2016 by

61.9% of interns become permanent employees upon graduation

One of the benefits of being an owner of College Recruiter is that we went live way back in 1996 and so we’ve seen a lot of things come and go, including strong and weak labor markets. Today’s labor market is, in some ways, strong and, in other ways, weak.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) recently reported in its Internship & Co-op Survey that its mostly large employer members are extending offers to a larger percentage of their interns, which is an indicator of a strong labor market, yet the acceptance rate of those offers is also high, which is an indicator of a weak labor market. In other words, employers are offering jobs to a higher percentage of candidates as they’re worried that it will be difficult for them to hire enough of the right people if they don’t extend all those offers yet, at the same time, a high percentage of candidates are accepting those offers as they’re worried that it will be difficult for them to get hired if they don’t accept those offers.

2004-16 Internship Offer, Acceptance, and Conversion Rates

 

According to NACE, “this year’s intern offer rate—72.7 percent—is the highest it has been since the peak of the pre-recession market (2006), although the corresponding acceptance rate—85.2 percent—still remains well above pre-recession levels. In turn, these two figures yielded a conversion rate of 61.9 percent, a 13-year high.” So, if you’re an intern or employing an intern and wondering what percentage of interns get and accept offers to work for their employer upon graduation, a pretty good estimate will be 61.9 percent.

Posted March 31, 2016 by

College recruiting ROI

When considering return on investment (ROI) in college recruiting, it’s best to look beyond short-term measures and to consider long-term distal measures. Talent acquisition leaders must really look at the big picture; they can’t lose the vision of the forest for the trees.

This series of four videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadiou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

 


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

This series is one set of videos in a larger series featuring WPG experts posted on College Recruiter’s YouTube channel highlighting best practices and a timeline for developing a college recruitment program.

What are the best ways to determine the return on investment in college recruiting? Is it cost per hire? Recruitment cost ratio? Number of hires made? Retention of employees? Number of job offers to acceptances?

There are multiple factors to consider; ultimately, it comes back to “I spent a certain amount of money to achieve a certain result. So where did I start with college recruiting? Why did I start this in the beginning? Am I achieving what I set out to achieve?”

This brings recruiters back to their objectives. If objectives are big-picture oriented, recruiters will want to use distal measures when determining the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs, not just cost measures or efficiency measures based on the current calendar year.

In the next video, WPG experts share a powerful real example of determining the ROI of college recruiting.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

If you spent $5000 to hire a student from a particular university, and that hired individual made a great discovery which added value to your organization, you would probably agree that the $5000 individual was a better investment than many other individuals you hired who cost your college recruiting program much less.

Thus, return on investment is a broad concept which encompasses much more than ratios and efficiency measures. Recruiters should thoroughly examine their objectives for their college recruitment programs. It’s not just about short-term costs.

The third video discusses the importance of considering both efficiency and effectiveness when determining the ROI of college recruitment programs.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Efficiency is measured by short-term standards; it can be measured by ratios. How many resumes did I obtain from the university? How many candidates were interviewed? How many did we hire? Efficiency measures help recruiters determine whether to adjust the recruiting process or not.

When considering effectiveness, you’re finished with proximal data and are ready to look at distal data and long-term measures. Most HR and recruiting professionals lack patience when it comes to measuring effectiveness. However, sometimes waiting to monitor effectiveness is very important. Defining clear objectives on the front end is crucial, and deciding how to measure and track your objectives at the beginning is just as important. If you don’t, you will not wind up gathering reliable data.

The WorkPlace Group also features an article on its website entitled “Backwards is Forwards” with more information about the ROI of college recruiting.

The final video in this series provides recruiters with final tips related to measuring ROI in college recruiting.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

WPG experts recommend checking out The National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE) website; it has some tools for assisting employers with measuring the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs.

As time goes on, employers learn that students who excel when hired are not the students they might have expected to excel. As time goes on, data provides expectations wrong. This is one reason it’s important to follow data and use it in the planning process. Study the data and measure long-term effectiveness (distal data). This will improve your college recruiting program and overall effectiveness.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted March 20, 2016 by

[video] The average cost-per-hire for on-campus recruiting is $3,582

Money saved for college with a small graduation cap

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Despite conventional wisdom, the vast majority of the students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities do not find their internships and entry-level jobs through their career service offices. The number of schools with well staffed and funded career service offices is, by many accounts, in the dozens yet there are over 7,400 post-secondary schools nationwide. Students at big, well funded, schools with strong brands amongst the largest employers of students can and often do find their jobs through their career service offices, but they’re the exception.

From the perspective of the employer, it is also worth noting that college recruiting isn’t nearly as expensive for the vast majority of hires as it would be if all of those students and grads were hired through on-campus recruiting. A recent study by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicated that the AVERAGE cost-per-hire of recruiting a student through on-campus recruiting is now $3,582 when employers properly account for all of their related costs such as the costs for their college relations / recruitment office, pre-recruiting activities, recruiting trips, company visits, hiring costs, relocation, and advertising. Ouch. That cost is even higher for elite students in elite majors at elite schools. Double ouch. (more…)

Posted March 03, 2016 by

NACE 2016: Benchmarks in college recruiting

At the 2016 National Association of Colleges and Employers Conference & Expo June 7-10 in Chicago, College Recruiter’s President and Founder Steven Rothberg will present a session for employers entitled “How to Benchmark Your University Relations Program in the Absence of Benchmarks.”

In this brief video hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, Rothberg explains why clear benchmarks in college recruiting do not often exist and helps define some potential solutions to this problem.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Rothberg mentions that in the field of college recruiting, until recently, very few college recruiting programs had benchmarks. As a result, many college recruiting programs did not know if they were operating effectively. Some college recruiting programs are beginning to share their operations data and establish benchmarks, but there is still a lack of continuity across the industry.

For example, not all organizations define cost per hire the same way. If a recruiter travels, and the company does not factor in all travel costs and salary costs, as well as fees charged by the university, then the cost per hire estimate is inaccurate. Failure to accurately estimate costs affects overall budget estimates.

It’s also important to use benchmarks accurately in order to measure success in college recruiting and to give credit where credit is due. Rothberg cites his work with a client recently who was able to pinpoint the exact number of candidates who’d been hired as a result of working with the college recruiting team.

Benchmarking is not just about measuring your own success, Rothberg notes, but also about comparing your achievements to those of others in the field whose organizations are similar to yours and who are hiring similar types of candidates. Cooperating with other employers by sharing benchmarking data can help you reach goals. This is what Rothberg’s session at the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo will focus on.

Don’t forget to register for the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo. Follow College Recruiter’s blog for more information about best practices in college recruiting, and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process?

Posted February 05, 2016 by

Why employers should use targeted advertising to reach college and university students and recent graduates

Small Interview Room

Stokkete/Shutterstock

Since the 1950’s, employers who wanted to hire the best and brightest college and university students and recent graduates sent their hiring managers and recruiters to interview on-campus. Organizations wanting to hire dozens, hundreds, or even thousands would have teams of employees on the road for weeks and even months conducting interviews in rooms which can best be described as glorified broom closets. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) recently reported that the average cost of hiring a student through on-campus recruiting is now more than $3,600. More and more employers are realizing that there must be a more efficient, effective way to hire their next generation of leaders.

At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. I founded the organization 25 years ago and we’ve evolved significantly over the years. One of the interactive, recruitment media solutions that we introduced a couple of years ago has seen tremendous success as it is designed to get the right opportunity in front of the right candidate at the right time. (more…)

Posted September 04, 2015 by

What percentage of college students graduate with at least one internship?

 

One of my favorite sources of information about all things recruiting is ERE Daily. I know most of the people who have worked there, who currently work there, and I hope to know most of the people who have yet to work there.

Occasionally, however, they publish an article which includes erroneous information. An example was an article about the so-called talent gap between the hard and soft skills offered by college students and recent graduates and those preferred and presented by employers.  (more…)

Posted July 07, 2015 by

What Are the Best Schools for Employers to Target When Trying to Hire Grads Now

President of College Recruiter niche job board Steven Rothberg recently interviewed president of Job Search Intelligence Paul Hill at the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)​ 2015 annual conference in Anaheim, California. In the interview, Steven and Paul discussed the Hidden Gem Index awards used by College Recruiter to recognize which colleges and universities are best for employers based upon the quality and availability for hire of the students.

Steven and Paul discussed how the schools were selected to receive the awards:

(more…)

Posted February 06, 2015 by

Highest Paying Jobs for 2015 College Grads

Highest Paying Industries for 2015 College GradsIf you are or are soon to be a recent graduate or an employer who plans to hire one, then this salary survey information should be of great interest to you.

The highest paying industry for 2015 graduates from four-year colleges and universities is oil and gas extraction, according to NACE’s January 2015 Salary Survey. The rest of the top five top-paying industries all deal with manufacturing. Employers in oil and gas extraction expect to pay their new college graduate hires starting salaries that average nearly $68,000.

Other industries that project to be top-paying for these graduates are motor vehicle manufacturing, chemical manufacturing, food and beverage manufacturing, and computer and electronics manufacturing, all of which are offering salaries that average more than $61,000.

Posted September 09, 2014 by

Will You Find an Internship that Leads to a New Job Opportunity?

What are the chances that you find an internship that will turn into a new job?  The following post features an infographic that may tell you.

According to a study by NACE, internship to job conversion has risen to 51.2 percent. So, your internship is more likely to turn into a full-time job now, right? Well, maybe. This interactive infographic depicts data from a new LinkedIn study about the correlation between students who do internships and how often those internships turn into full-time jobs

Link:

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