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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 04, 2016 by

Stay-at-home mom to CEO: Transferring skills to the workplace

During one of our one-on-one meetings, Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, laughed as I described some of my potty training woes with my toddler.

“Just continue to lower your parenting expectations, and you’ll be fine.”

This sage advice has saved me from numerous mommy meltdowns. Faith Rothberg is not only a wonderful workplace mentor, but she’s also a mentor for young moms as well. Faith was recently featured in an article about returning to the workplace by OptIn as well.

Faith, a mother of three children, two of whom no longer reside at home, is a true parenting expert. She chose to stay home to care for her children after establishing her own career in the field of information technology after earning her MBA at the University of Michigan. Before earning her stay-at-home mom (SAHM) status, she worked for Ford Motor Company as a programmer, a manufacturing information technology consultant for KPMG, and for Wells Fargo as a project manager. Faith’s family photos adorn the walls of her house—even her home office—and she doesn’t hide the fact that her family comes first.

Yet as CEO of College Recruiter, an online recruitment media company named one of the world’s top career sites by Forbes, WEDDLE’s, and Business.com, how does Faith strike a balance between work and family? How did she transition back into the workplace after staying home with her children for 13 years? How did her SAHM experience provide her with transferable skills which now benefit her as CEO?

I recently interviewed my boss, Faith Rothberg, to ask her these very questions and more.


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Faith made the decision to stay home with her children after her second son was born. She admits she didn’t feel she was doing well as a mom or as a professional at this time in her life. The biggest surprise she had at this time was how hard it felt to be home every day and how many decisions she was faced with making all day long while caring for her children. She realized right away that she was building better multitasking skills, decision-making, and problem-solving skills as a parent. These are transferable skills that certainly aid her now in the workplace.

Many stay-at-home moms struggle when deciding whether to re-enter the workplace. “I don’t know if you ever know exactly that it’s the right time. When I made the decision to come back and start in our business . . . it was really good timing for the business, and it was almost good timing for me,” Faith candidly shares.

She admits she was worried she would not be able to be as available for her children. There was certainly an emotional component which was difficult during the transition back to work.

Faith suggests that parents who stay home with their children should remain active in their communities and at their children’s schools. Parents can volunteer in the classroom, on committees, and in non-profit organizations in order to round out their resumes to avoid major gaps with absolutely no experience.

Faith offers three tips for stay-at-home moms considering a return to the workplace.

  1. Evaluate what you want to do.

Often what you were doing before you had children isn’t what you want to do now (when returning to the workplace). You may have had a great paying job before having children, but now you may have different goals or objectives. Take some time and either work with a career coach or take career assessments online to reevaluate your goals. Get a career mentor and seek advice and guidance.

  1. Once you know what you want to do, update your resume.

You’ll have a gap on your resume during the time you stayed home with your children, and you may not have professional work experience to list on your resume during this gap. Use the volunteer experience and community involvement to fill in the gaps on your resume.

  1. Network.

Network with other children’s parents and with the spouses of those other stay-at-home parents. Network back with your former coworkers. Use LinkedIn and other social media sites. Send your resume to your contacts and friends and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

For more tips related to transferable skills, transitioning back into the workforce, and searching for jobs, visit our blog and follow us on social media at LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

 

 

Posted February 11, 2016 by

Multitasking doesn’t matter to recruiters

In college recruiting, employers don’t value multitasking as one of the skills at the top of their list. While multitasking may demonstrate effort, it does not necessarily produce the best results. Many students list multitasking on their resumes because multitasking is a popular soft skill candidates have been taught to list on their resumes. The bottom line is recruiters want to hire candidates who produce results.

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, asserts that employers care more about hiring candidates who have outlined their accomplishments in detail on their resumes over candidates who have simply listed lots of popular soft skills at the top of their resumes.

Photo of Anne Grinols

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business

“Job candidates who say they can multitask think they are saying they can accomplish more than others because they can focus on more than one thing at once. However, multitasking can also be seen as a negative. I think this is because efforts to multitask have had unfortunate results: poor outcomes and burnout of those trying to do it for extended periods of time.

In the real world, most of the time, results count more than the process to achieve them. A good process is more likely to result in consistent, good results; so process matters. But it matters precisely because of the results, not on its own account.

Employers are more interested in outcomes than efforts. Multitasking refers to the latter. I would not use the term ‘multitasking’ on my resume. Instead, I would indicate expertise in multiple areas, timely production and excellence in outcomes.”

Looking for more resume tips? Visit College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Anne Grinols serves as Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. She teaches in Baylor’s full-time and online MBA programs. Her research areas include interpersonal communication, ethics, and online education. As assistant dean, she supports faculty development in teaching and research, and has a leadership role in the ethics initiatives in the business school. Before coming to Baylor in January 2004, Grinols was director of management communication for the University of Illinois Business School, where she taught management communication and critical thinking for business from 1996-2003 and oversaw the MBA Communication Center.

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted August 05, 2015 by

6 Terrible Mistakes Employees Often Make That Cost Their Promotion

female boss yelling at employee at work

Female boss yelling at employee at work. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Who does not want to get a promotion? Every one of us strives at our workplaces to get promoted or to find a better job. Why don’t all of us get a promotion that easily? It is probably because not all of us know what it takes for earning one. Career development is not something that people are taught in schools. That is one reason why many people are bad at using the right career development strategy. Even if you have the right skills, people fail in getting a promotion because of this problem.

But, you would stand a better chance of getting a promotion at your work now; all you need to do is to be aware of what is going wrong. Take a look at the following 6 most common mistakes that can cost you the promotion: (more…)

Posted August 11, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Want Attention on Your Entry Level Jobs? 5 Things You Can Do

In order to stand out on their entry level jobs in the right way, young professionals can do these five things in the following post.

No matter what industry you work in, all careers boil down to one rule: don’t be stepped on, stay one step ahead. Stand out from your colleagues so when it’s time to discuss raises and promotions, you can be a strong contender. Trying to break away from the pack?

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Posted July 07, 2014 by

How to Turn Your College Job into a Career

Coach watching a batter about to hit

Coach watching a batter about to hit. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Do you know what you want to be when you grow up? Plenty of grown-ups don’t know the answer to that question. College offers a series of different majors, but the career paths that stem from them aren’t always clear. If you major in education, you might feel like you have to be a teacher. If you major in pre-med, you might feel like you have to be a doctor. The truth is, you don’t.

A million shades of gray exist in the wild world of employment. A person with an education major could end up landing a job as a writer or editor in their field of expertise. A person with a pre-med major might decide to skip med school and take a position as a research assistant or lab technologist. (more…)

Posted June 11, 2014 by

Recent Graduates, Do You Feel Overmatched on Your Entry Level Jobs? Work Smarter with These 6 Tips

At some point on their entry level jobs, recent graduates might feel overmatched.  In the following post, learn six tips that will help them be more effective at work.

On the one hand, junior professionals crave responsibility, and want all the experience they can get. On the other hand, as companies strive to do more with fewer resources, it is not uncommon to feel overworked, overwhelmed and under-appreciated. When you’re starting to feel overloaded, keep these tips in mind for managing projects, priorities

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Posted May 06, 2014 by

Want a Longer Life? Sit Less on Your Entry Level Job

If you are interested in prolonging your life while on your entry level job, check out an infographic in the following post encouraging you to sit less, and some tips for improving your health.

If Americans limited their time of sitting by three hours the average lifespan would be extended two years. Use these simple excuses to stand every hour to extend your own life expectancy.  STAND MORE SIT LESS – We all know that it is good for our health, just have to figure out how to implement it daily. Loved this

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Posted February 25, 2014 by

Trying to Manage Time on Those Entry Level Jobs? 5 Tips to Grasp Your Career

At some point on their entry level jobs, employees might have trouble managing their time.  To get a firm grasp on their careers, they should try five tips found in the following post.

The truth is, if you can’t manage your time, you’ll find it hard to properly manage your career. In order to reach any level of career success – be it a raise, a promotion or a new job – you need to first know how to take control of your daily tasks and responsibilities rather than letting them control you.

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Posted February 12, 2014 by

Want to Improve Performance on Recent College Graduate Jobs? Here are 7 Tips

Young professionals who want to improve performance on their recent college graduate jobs should keep seven tips in mind, according to the following post.

There are many benefits to performing better at your job; promotions, pay raises and increased job security among them. While the results are easy to grasp, many have trouble understanding what it takes to earn these results; they don’t know exactly how to achieve more without falling into “working harder” trap and trying to cram more hours

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