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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 11, 2016 by

3 events employers won’t want to miss on college campuses

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Recruiters and hiring managers are constantly searching for top talent to fill job openings for employers. A lot of the talent employers need and want can potentially be found on college campuses. Recruiting on campus means taking time from their busy schedules unless employers reach out to companies like College Recruiter for help with creative advertising solutions. If companies decide to visit institutions of higher education face-to-face, what are the most important events for them to attend? For employers pondering this issue, Jennifer Donovan, Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, shares three events recruiters and talent acquisition professionals should attend on her campus.

  • Fall and Spring Career Fairs, where thousands of students can meet employers, learn about their companies and career opportunities, and schedule one-on-one interviews with recruiters on the spot.  More than 500 employers attend Michigan Tech’s Career Fairs each year. This is pretty impressive, considering that we are about as remote as you can get, 500 miles north of Detroit and near no other big cities. Our dynamic Career Fairs probably account for Michigan Tech’s astounding 94 percent job placement rate within 6 months of graduation.
  • CareerFest/Industry Days, a series of industry-specific events in a tent in the middle of campus, including hands-on activities, demos, barbecues, lab tours. A very popular and well-attended one is Automotive Days. Others include Steel Days, Rail Days and Mining Days. CareerFest and Industry Days give employers a chance to zero in on the students who are particularly interested in their industry, to inform them and perhaps attract new interest in the field.
  • Design Expo, where student teams display and explain their year-long research projects, ranging from a micro-scale processor that can fix pacemakers in place to a dryer for small-scale hops growers. The projects are industry-sponsored and give the students a chance to work across disciplinary lines to solve real-world employer problems. Employers attending Design Expo could see what innovative problem-solvers Michigan Tech students are trained to be.”
Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Looking for more advice on recruiting top talent? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Jennifer Donovan is Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, a STEM-focused state university on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. She assigns, writes, and edits stories for the university’s news website and daily e-newsletter, Tech Today, and works with news media locally, nationally, and internationally to help them find expert sources and story ideas. In a previous life, she was a newspaper reporter and magazine writer. She lives in Houghton, Michigan, with her two cats.

 

Posted June 25, 2016 by

The #1 student job search mistake

As an Associate Career Services Director for the University of Michigan and the CEO of Break into Tech, I’ve had the privilege to work with hundreds of students during the job search while trying to launch their careers. And it’s an area I’m particularly proud to support, having leveraged my own student experience to land roles at Apple, LinkedIn, and startups.

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

But the one thing that shocks me time and again is that 95% of students make the same mistake when it comes to landing a job. And no, it’s not a bad resume, or a poorly written cover letter or even weak interview skills. Instead, it’s that most basic trait:

Humility.

Yes, humility.

Now, I know what you’re thinking. “Huh? How hard could it be to act humble?”

But here’s the real deal. That same confidence is a handicap. Because it blinds students to just how hard it is to stay humble in a world where everyone always has to be on, to constantly present their best self.

As evidence, allow me to submit my experience as a Michigan alum working at LinkedIn:

  • Every single day during application season, I’d received at least one email from a current student who wanted to work in Silicon Valley
  • Usually, those emails started out: “Dear Jeremy, I’m XXX and I’d really like to work at LinkedIn…”
  • Eventually I’d get on the phone with these students, and they’d spend the first 15 minutes of the call telling me about themselves, and the last 15 minutes asking me if I could help them get a job.
  • Then, I’d never hear from them again.

On the other hand, about 2-3 times a year, the sequence would go very differently:

  • I’d get an email from a student well before application season that said: “Dear Jeremy, As a a Michigan student, I was so excited to come across your profile today. I can’t tell you how inspiring it was to find someone who’s walked your path. I know you must be really busy, but would you ever have a few minutes to share your story with me?”
  • When I got on the phone with them, we’d spend 15 minutes talking about my experience, followed by 15 minutes of them asking me for my advice about really tricky career questions.
  • Then they’d follow-up the next month to wish me a happy holiday or update me on campus. And they’d continue to do that each month with cool articles they found or little tidbits of school news.
  • Then, only when application season finally rolled around, would they ever ask for support during the application process.

And sure enough, about 2-3 times a year, I’d write an internal recommendation for a student, basically guaranteeing them an interview.

Now, any guesses which students I went to bat for?

Hopefully that illuminates two things about the job search:

BUT

  • You’ve got to network in the right way – the humble way.

Which means no:

  • Waiting until application season to reach out – you need to build relationships in advance; not at the last second.
  • Focusing all the attention on yourself – you need to build a real relationship; not just a transaction.
  • One shot networking – you need to build a relationship over time, not in a single phone call. This aids your job search.

So consider yourself warned. Yes, humility is critical to your job search success. But don’t assume it’s going to be easy. Instead, make it a priority and work hard at it. And then you can avoid the biggest mistake that’s trapped so many others!

Jeremy Schifeling, CEO of Break Into Tech

Jeremy Schifeling, CEO of Break Into Tech

Need more help networking and figuring out how to build great relationships on your way to finding a great entry-level job? College Recruiter can help. Keep reading our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Jeremy Schifeling is the Founder + Chief Nerd at Break into Tech, a site for anyone who wants to land an awesome tech job, no matter their background. Get a free guide to the seven ultimate secrets that took Jeremy from school to Silicon Valley!

Posted August 27, 2014 by

Applying for Entry Level Jobs? What Years of Experience Means in a Job Description

When applying for entry level jobs, how much should you weigh years of experience when reading a job description.  Learn more in the following post.

I’m going to let you in on a little job searching secret: The “years of experience” section of a job description is often a white lie. The job I got after graduating from college “required” 3 to 5 years of experience. (I had none.) The job I just got “required” 5+ years of

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Posted May 29, 2014 by

Searching Jobs for College Students? Don’t Be a Bug a Boo in These 3 Ways

Being eager in your search for jobs for college students is okay, as long as you don’t do anything over the top to hurt your chances of employment.  The following post shares three ways to be a bug a boo that will annoy employers.

Persistence is key in a job search, but can you take it too far? A new study by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis reveals that more than 65 percent of job seekers contact employers directly as a method of job searching. While this shows employers you’re taking active steps to find a job, there

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Posted May 12, 2014 by

Just Had a Vacation from Those Recent Graduate Jobs? Don’t Post Photos that Might Harm Your Career

While you might be tempted to show off your vacation photos, be careful not the rub anyone the wrong way on those recent graduate jobs.  Learn more in the following post.

You’ve been endlessly plugging away at work for months; spending late nights at the office and wishing that someone would invent a coffee IV already. Impressing your boss at every turn can be exhausting, so you start desperately counting down the days to when you can finally get some R & R and your skin can

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Posted April 30, 2014 by

Want to Connect about Entry Level Jobs? 4 Places You May Not Think of to Network

There are some places you may not think of to network for entry level jobs.  Learn four of them in the following post.

If you’re a college student or entry-level job seeker, the phrase “it’s all about who you know” is more true than ever. Every person you meet could be a difference-maker. But, when every traditional networking opportunity is flooded with like-minded young professionals all trying to get ahead,

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Posted March 31, 2014 by

Want to Standout from Other Candidates for Recent Graduate Jobs? 6 Tips that Can Benefit Your Career

If you are searching for recent graduate jobs, think about how you can standout from other candidates so that you will get hired.  In the following post, learn six tips that can benefit your career.

You have a career-defining interview or presentation coming up that’ll require hefty preparation, knowledge, confidence and communication. And naturally, you’re wondering what you’re up against. Any competitive field calls for the need to differentiate yourself. But how? A smile is the first step to influencing positive emotions in the world around you. Take it from

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Posted March 27, 2014 by

Is Your Entry Level Job Search at a Standstill? 5 Adjustments to Get It Going

If your entry level job search isn’t going anywhere at the moment, consider making five adjustments to give it a boost found in the following post.

You just know you’ve done everything right in your job search. You’ve applied for every job you found online, but you haven’t received a single call back. As your anxiety increases, you try to think of a reason why you’re not getting job interviews. It must be because of the job market. That was your

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Posted January 29, 2014 by

Want a Winning Strategy When Searching for Recent College Graduate Jobs? 5 Tips that Can Make a Difference

If you’re looking for a new strategy when searching for recent college graduate jobs, the following post offers one, along with five tips to boost your job search.

Whatever your job search situation, you’ll have much better results if you focus your energy on what will get real results… rather than sporadically applying to every job you find and hoping for the best. Check out these 5 tips to help you craft a better job search strategy that works to help you find a job faster…

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Posted December 30, 2013 by

Think Your Degree is Enough to Advance on Recent College Graduate Jobs? 4 Ways to Enhance Your Career

Some young professionals who have landed recent college graduate jobs might think their degree(s) are enough to move up in the working world.  However, it takes more.  In the following post, learn four ways to enhance your career.

expect to stay relevant resting on your diploma. It just isn’t enough. With jobs getting cut faster than the fat off Heidi Montag’s bum, members of the currently-employed elite need to upgrade their professional cred – and do it now…

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