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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 30, 2016 by

Networking on college campuses builds relationships

Human resources photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Building a relationship with anyone requires time and effort. Once a relationship is established, both parties must work to maintain it. If recruiters and hiring managers want to really connect with college students, they should consider showing up on college campuses. These are networking opportunities not only for students but also for employers. Employers can create connections by personally interacting with college students, answering their questions, or by handing out business cards or other company information. Recruiters and hiring managers who spend time and energy on college campuses can not only network with students but also potentially build long-term relationships with schools. Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific, shares his thoughts on the importance of recruiters attending networking events on college campuses.

“It’s important for organizations with ongoing hiring needs at the college degree level to build and maintain excellent working relationships with their target institutions. Many times, it takes a year or two for given organizations to begin building strong brand reputations at colleges and universities that will attract the top caliber talent they (and other employers) desire.

Creating good recruiting relationships means you want college students talking to and talking up your organization to other students. Nothing is more powerful than trusted friends making a referral based on their own first-hand experience. Approved sponsorship opportunities with key student groups can also help cultivate student recognition of your organization.

Developing a strong partnership with the college’s career services operation is probably the most important thing an organization can do. Doing so can open all kinds of opportunities to engage students and even faculty potentially. In my 20 plus years doing this, I have seen time and again those employers who commit to long-term relationships with schools (i.e., don’t abandon the relationship even when employers are not hiring or there may be a market downturn) will be the most successful.”

Learn more on the importance of networking on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione is the Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific. Tom earned a Ph.D. in Counseling from Ohio University, specializing in college student career development. Tom has 22 years of progressively, responsible experience in career services/placement and university student affairs and works extensively with employers seeking to hire college students or alumni.

Posted March 02, 2015 by

Kind of personal devices used by students in higher education

College students in a computer lab

College students in a computer lab. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Using modern technology and personal devices as the means to assistance and enhancing learning for students is now a very common and regular concept.

As the modern world continues to shape up and evolve the change in dynamics that influence, different forms of learning also change. The shift from learning while sitting at a place like classrooms to more virtual kind of studying is now very evident, the use of technology especially the personal devices gain momentum and importance. Students now prefer to use a lot of technology in order to assist them with learning. The concept of distributed learning as they call is now very popular. This means that students who might be enrolled in the same classroom and course will prefer to use their own computers, devices and tablets to learn about it and read their reading materials from their own personal devices once they get done from the lectures. As a matter of fact within the classrooms, now students bring their portable devices to record lectures or notes. Gone are the days when copies and pencils were used to write notes and do assignments. (more…)