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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 03, 2013 by

10 Top Industries For Job Seeking College Grads

Upward arrow with staircase

Upward arrow with staircase graphic courtesy of Shutterstock

Which industries are seeing the most growth in entry-level jobs for college-educated workers? Industries with the largest year-over-year growth for entry-level jobs are: (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

10 Hottest Majors for Job Seeking College Grads

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Which college majors stand to fare better in today’s job market? Which industries and locations are seeing the most growth in entry-level jobs for college-educated workers? New research  shows where the jobs are and what employers are willing to negotiate in job offers for America’s next generation of workers.

“More than half of employers reported they plan to hire recent college graduates this year,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “College students who are graduating in business, technology and health-related majors will have an advantage in terms of the volume of opportunities available today. However, other majors such as liberal arts and sciences are also attractive to employers as they look for individuals with strong communications and critical-thinking skills.”

In-Demand College Majors

In a nationwide online survey of more than 2,000 employers, CareerBuilder and Harris Interactive© asked companies which college majors were most in demand at their firms. Similar to last year, business and technical majors are the most sought after: (more…)

Posted May 02, 2013 by

Top 4 Reasons Why 34% of Healthcare Workers Plan to Quit in 2013

Jason Lovelace, President of CareerBuilder Healthcare

Jason Lovelace, President of CareerBuilder Healthcare

Heavy patient loads, smaller staffs and higher stress levels may be causing health care workers to check themselves out of their facilities. More than a third (34 percent) of health care workers plan to look for a new job in 2013, up from 24 percent last year. Nearly half (45 percent) plan to look for a new job over the next two years. Eighty-two percent said that while they are not actively looking for a job today, they would be open to a new position if they came across the right opportunity.

“Not only are health care organizations dealing with a shortage of high skill workers, they are facing higher demand fueled by an aging population and more Americans having access to medical benefits,” said Jason Lovelace, president of CareerBuilder Healthcare. “Nearly half – 46 percent – of health care organizations said they have seen a negative impact on their organizations due to extended job vacancies.* Long hours and juggling multiple patient needs are taking their toll on morale and retention. The survey shows health care workers are seeking a more manageable work experience.” (more…)

Posted April 26, 2013 by

Men Earn Average of $68,300 Versus $44,400 For Women Because Highest-Paying Jobs Dominated by Men

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

For years there’s been a lot of controversy about why men tend to make far more money than women. I’ve seen a number of studies showing that the average woman makes about 75 percent of what the average man makes. Some believe that the problem — if it even is a problem — is due to women tending to choose occupational fields which pay less than the occupational fields which tend to be chosen by men. One counter argument to that is that many occupations require similar educational backgrounds, supply and demand for the labor, skill requirements, riskiness, and other such attributes and yet the occupations dominated by women are still paid less. An example I’ve often heard to illustrate this point is that skilled production line workers tend to make more than school teachers.

Whether one agrees that similar jobs should pay similarly or whether the market will somehow sort out who should be paid more, the data is clear that men tend to earn far more than women. A new study from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) underscores the continued wage gap in the U.S. On average, men earn $68,300 annually compared to $44,400 for women, and there continues to be a lower percentage of women in the nation’s highest-paying occupations. The study also shows that while women continue to lag men in leadership roles, trends are pointing in a positive direction with women being more equally represented or surpassing men in various high-skill, specialized positions. (more…)

Posted April 19, 2013 by

Most Employers Don’t Care What School Recent Grads Attended

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

The college graduating class of 2013 will enter a stronger job market than in the years immediately following the recession; however, young professionals entering high-skill fields may have a decided advantage, according to a new study. More than half (53 percent) of U.S. employers plan to hire recent college graduates in 2013, on par with 2012 (54 percent) and up significantly from 46 percent in 2011 and 44 percent in 2010.

The nationwide survey—conducted online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013— included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Employers in industries that generally demand more high-skill workers are also more likely to recruit recent college graduates. According to the survey, information technology employers rank ahead of all industries with 65 percent of hiring managers and human resources professionals planning to hire recent graduates. They are followed by financial services employers (63 percent) and health care employers (56 percent). Additionally, the survey found that employers in IT and financial services are the most likely to recruit workers for hard-to-fill jobs (37 percent, each) prior to graduation. (more…)

Posted April 11, 2013 by

15 Weirdest Requests Employees Have Received From Their Bosses

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

What is the strangest thing your boss has asked you to do? Spy on senior management? Work on her daughter’s science project? How about loan him money? Nearly one-in-four workers (23 percent) reported that their bosses have asked them to perform tasks that are not related to their jobs, according to a new CareerBuilder study.

The national survey, which was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013, included more than 3,600 U.S. workers across industries and company sizes. Additional results draw from a similar study conducted in November 2012 among more than 3,500 workers.

Grading the Boss

Most workers like reporting to their current boss. When asked to grade their boss’s performance, the majority (66 percent) gave an above average rating: (more…)

Posted April 04, 2013 by

23% of Employers Plan to Hire Additional Workers in Q2

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Stable hiring is expected for the second quarter as U.S. employers continue to size up a market that is producing moderate economic growth, according to CareerBuilder’s latest job forecast. Twenty-six percent of employers plan to increase full-time, permanent headcount in the next three months, similar to projections for the previous two quarters, but trending below Q2 estimates last year.

The national survey, which was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013, included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

“The U.S. job market is in a better place today, but concerns over spending cuts, wavering global economies and other factors are weighing on employers’ minds,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “We expect continued stability and improvement as the year goes on. When we look at listings on CareerBuilder.com, job growth isn’t confined to technology and healthcare and other areas that have fared well post-recession. The rebound in the housing sector is having a positive influence on job creation for related industries that have been struggling.” (more…)

Posted March 20, 2013 by

41% of Employers Suffering Loss of Productivity Due to Difficulty Hiring for I.T., Sales, Engineering, Other Positions

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

The growing deficit of skilled labor needed to fill in-demand jobs is causing a drag on employers across the globe. A significant number of employers in the ten largest world economies said that extended job vacancies have resulted in lower revenue and productivity and the inability to grow their businesses. Employers in China were the most likely to report having open positions they cannot fill and corresponding negative effects on their company performance. Russia houses the largest percentage of employers reporting a revenue shortfall tied to extended job vacancies while the U.S. is among those most likely to report a productivity loss. Japan ranked high among those who said the inability to find skilled talent has impeded expansion of their businesses.

The global CareerBuilder survey, conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 1 to November 30, 2012, included more than 6,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals in countries with the largest gross domestic product.

“The inability to fill high skill jobs can have an adverse ripple effect, hindering the creation of lower-skilled positions, company performance and economic expansion,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “Major world economies are feeling the effects of this in technology, healthcare, production and other key areas. The study underlines how critical it is for the government, private sector and educational institutions to work together to prepare and reskill workers for opportunities that can help move the needle on employment and economic growth.” (more…)

Posted February 21, 2013 by

82% of Applicants Expect Answers From Employers Yet Only 25% Get It

Sanja Licina of Careerbuilder

Sanja Licina of Careerbuilder

Job hunting can be a frustrating process especially if you have no idea whether the employer made a decision or even saw your application. More than one in four workers reported that they have had a bad experience when applying for a job. The vast majority (75 percent) of workers who applied to jobs using various resources in the last year said they never heard back from the employer, according to a nationwide CareerBuilder survey.

While this speaks to the challenges of finding employment in a highly competitive market, it also brings to light negative implications for today’s employers. The survey shows candidates who have had a bad experience when applying for a position are less likely to seek employment at that company again and are more likely to discourage friends and family from applying or purchasing products from that company. The study of more than 3,900 U.S. workers was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 1 to November 30, 2012.

How important is it to acknowledge every job applicant? (more…)

Posted February 13, 2013 by

30% of Those Date Who Co-Workers Get Married to One

Office Romance

Office romance photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Looking for love this Valentine’s Day? It may just be in the cube next to you. Thirty-nine percent of workers said they have dated a co-worker at least once over the course of their career; 17 percent reported dating co-workers at least twice. Thirty percent of those who have dated a co-worker said their office romance led them to the altar. This is according to CareerBuilder’s annual office romance survey of more than 4,000 workers nationwide, conducted online by Harris Interactive© between November 1 and November 30, 2012.

How Many Dated the Boss?

While the majority of relationships developed between peers, 29 percent of workers who have dated someone at work said they have dated someone above them in the company hierarchy, and16 percent admitted to dating their boss. Women were more likely to date someone higher up in their organization – 38 percent compared to 21 percent of men.

Which Industries Have the Most Romance? (more…)