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Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

Bad job interview - concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted May 19, 2015 by

End-of-Year Checklist for College Juniors

Senior and junior college colleagues. Lady dressed in fashion wear whereas girl in casuals carrying backpack.

Senior and junior college colleagues. Lady dressed in fashion wear whereas girl in casuals carrying backpack. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Seniors are already on their way to being done with college and are frantically looking for a job. However, college juniors are encouraged to create an end-of-year checklist for success so their senior year and graduation are easier. Advanced preparation is a key to success in today’s economic climate. Although graduation may seem a long time away, there are many things juniors can do to set themselves up for success upon graduation. (more…)

Posted November 07, 2014 by

The things students need to do before going home this Christmas

Christmas is just around the corner, but as a university student there are a few things that you need to consider before you pack your bags and head home to enjoy the festive season.

Below is a list of things that most students need to do before heading ho, ho, home this year.

Woman typing on keyboard

Woman typing on keyboard. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Get your work done early

The build-up to Christmas is not all about Christmas lunch, going out with friends and presents as it is also an extremely busy time for students, with many having to sit exams or hand in essays before they break up for Xmas.

So no matter whether you are studying computer science degree courses or economics degrees, get your work done early. If you know that you have some work to do after Christmas, then at least start it before you head home because no one wants to spend the Christmas holidays writing essays. (more…)

Posted October 31, 2014 by

How to Become a Real Estate Agent after Graduation

Real estate: Agent ready to sell home

Real estate: Agent ready to sell home. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Choosing the best profession can be a daunting affair especially in modern times. Though there is prevalence of information, you might be lost with choices, as all careers look promising at a glance. Real estate still is a lucrative profession and you can create an excellent career with the right information. (more…)

Posted October 29, 2014 by

Struggle in an Effective Manner to Carry Out Successful Study Sessions

Student preparing for the exams. Isolated on white background

Student preparing for the exams. Isolated on white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Believe it or not a study session becomes a daunting task for students who don’t struggle in an effective manner. Whether you are preparing for class test or exams it is crucial for you to study in an effective manner in order to obtain good results. If you are longing to carry out an effective study session to get yourself prepared for exams then you must consider some crucial elements. Review the information provided below to obtain maximum grades in tests as well as in exams too. (more…)

Posted September 16, 2013 by

5 Tips to Help Balance Study Time and Recent Graduate Jobs

You might find that going to school while working is quite the challenge.  That is why you need to give yourself enough time to do both.  The following post offers five tips for balancing study time with recent graduate jobs.

Guest blog by Heather Townsend, co-author of ‘How to make partner and still have a life’ and author of ‘FT Guide To Business Networking’, and guest blogger for Big4.com. Gaining your professional qualifications is something which will give your career a firm foundation – regardless of whether you actually end up. However, unlike university

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Posted June 20, 2013 by

“3 Steps To Quickly Absorb The Material In Any College Class And Ace Your Exams”

Nancy Thomason

Nancy Thomason

You have a lot of overwhelming information to absorb in your college classes. Mere rote memorization is seldom enough to ace university tests. In fact, the exams your professors give often requires you to show you can apply critical thinking skills to this information.

Improving how you attack your books and notes during your study sessions will make the difference between getting a mediocre grade of C or A which can make a big difference when you’re looking for a job or getting into grad school after graduation.  Often the students who get the best grades are not any smarter than you. They’re just more effective in test preparation and test taking skills. (more…)

Posted January 02, 2009 by

How to Get Good Grades Without Getting Burned Out

If you’re currently in college or follow Dan Schwabel’s Personal Branding blog, you’ve probably heard of Study Hacks. If you haven’t heard of this blog, created by MIT doctoral student and author of How to Become a Straight-A Student, Cal Newport, read on.
Study Hacks is all about optimizing your college experience. Too bad Newport started it in late 2007, after I had already graduated. His article on how to ace blue book exams would have come in handy. But he doesn’t just blog about taking exams. He also blogs about how to prepare for them in ways that won’t have you dragging yourself out of bed the next morning because you were cramming until the wee hours of the night before. Math majors can read his blogs about acing Calculus and about how he earned top marks in Discrete (finite) Mathematics.
If you’re just now learning about Study Hacks, you probably missed his post back in early November about his search for students with college success stories for him to consider using in his next book. He may have already amassed all the stories he needs, but just in case there’s room for one more, you can email him at author@calnewport.com
More recently, Newport posted an article about a scholarship that’s being offered by his friend, Ramit. It’s called, I Will Teach You To Be Rich Scholarship for Social Innovation, and the deadline for entries is January 15, 2009. The deadline for anyone who wants Newport’s feedback first have until January 10, 2009.
Study Hacks advocates relaxing and studying smarter, rather than harder – a practice that can easily lead to burn out – in order to get the most out of your college experience. This is especially important for students who are juggling classes and internships, in addition to extracurricular activities.
If you want to get good grades, manitain an active social life on campus, and still have enough energy for internships and sports, Study Hacks is the blog for you.