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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted September 01, 2017 by

Upskilling talent and 5 reasons to look past your top schools and majors

 

If recruiters aren’t looking beyond their annual list of campuses, or looking beyond the traditional 4-year graduate, or expanding the short list of majors they actively seek, they could be sinking their own ship.

I am not the first one to point this out. LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner says their emphasis moving forward is on “skills, not degrees.” Here are five reasons why talent acquisition professionals need to look beyond their list of top schools and major. (more…)

Posted July 31, 2017 by

Diversity in the workplace: recruitment tips and tactics Part 2 [expert panel discussion]

 

As demographics change in the United States, including at college campuses, we should be seeing more diversity in the workplace. So why is the needle moving so slowly? In today’s panel discussion with College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, we explore strategies for talent acquisition professionals to improve their diversity recruitment. Today our discussion touched on what an inclusive recruitment process looks like, differences between the government and private sectors, and concrete tips for talent acquisition professionals. (more…)

Posted July 27, 2017 by

Fall 2017 college recruitment trends and challenges [white paper]

 

As the 2017-18 school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. College Recruiter teamed up with our friends at NAS Recruitment Innovation to create a white paper chock full of insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs this fall. (more…)

Posted July 24, 2017 by

Diversity recruitment: Big impact strategies and mistakes Part 1 [expert panel discussion]

 

As demographics change in the United States, including at college campuses, employers should have more diverse new hires. So why is the needle moving so slowly? Here we explore strategies for talent acquisition professionals to improve their diversity recruitment. Our discussion touches on mistakes recruiters make, big impact strategies and becoming culturally confident.

We were joined by Alexandra Levit, a workplace consultant; Toni Newborn, J.D., Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at City of St. Paul; and Bruce Soltys, Director of University Relations at Travelers. This is Part 1 of our discussion. Part 2 discusses what an inclusive recruitment process looks like, differences between the government and private sectors, and concrete tips for talent acquisition professionals. (more…)

Posted May 15, 2017 by

Summer intern onboarding: Good and bad practices

 

Onboarding should be a positive and productive experience for interns. When you build a successful onboarding program, you benefit in the short-term with satisfied interns who will give their all, and you also benefit in the long-term when your best interns convert to full-time employees.

We wanted to bring forth some best practices and common mistakes for onboarding summer interns, so we checked in with our friend Saïd Radhouani, Ph.D., Co-founder of Nextal, a collaborative applicant tracking system. Radhouani, who holds a double Ph.D. in Management and Computer Science, has built teams from scratch and put in place strategies to serve some of the largest web and mobile properties in Canada. We also gathered insight from Wes Higby, President of Full City Tech Co, where he consults in employee development and other services.

8 essential elements to successfully onboard your interns

These seven steps will help you set up your interns for success:

  • Onboarding doesn’t start on the first day. Interns should begin onboarding before that, especially for interns who accept the position months before they graduate and begin your program. It is your responsibility to make a great first impression and show interns that your company is a good place to work, and that they will be given an opportunity to grow and succeed. Consider assigning each intern to a peer advisor who meets with them before they start. Consider inviting them to holiday parties, community service activities, and other office events where they can meet their future co-workers. At the very least, before your interns arrive, they should already understand your organization’s history, vision, and mission. Another excellent way to start off right is to ensure administrative paperwork is done before the first day, instead of boring your interns to death on their first day.
  • Welcome your interns authenticallyGive them a personal and warm welcome. It is very important to schedule a real moment for your new interns to be personally welcomed. Interns lack experience and might need special treatment in the beginning to facilitate their transition into a professional environment. Their first day’s experience can have a big impact on their integration within the work environment. Set up their workspace and equipment so that area is clean and ready to go. All technology (computer, phones, passwords) should be set up properly and working.
  • Organize a site visit for them. Give office staff notice beforehand so they can be present and introduce themselves. This will give them a taste for your organizational culture and the business background. The more people they connect with, the more they will feel included in the day to day life of your organization.
  • Introduce them to their own team. They need to know right away who they will be working with. This will lay the foundation for their sense of belonging. Don’t underestimate the importance of this–your interns who feel connected, safe and included from the beginning will be likely to identify with the higher organizational needs.
  • Appoint both a manager and a mentor. While the manager will manage the work of the intern and ensure projects stay on focus, the mentor will have a role of a facilitator. The mentor will be in charge of providing any information (not necessarily related to the intern’s project) that will help the intern in their role.
  • Clarify expectations. The manager has to clarify expectations from both sides: what the intern is expecting to get from the internship, and what the manager is expecting to get from the intern. To do so, it’s very important to provide a real work assignment and define the success criteria. Remember that college students are used to seeing a syllabus for each of their courses. Consider creating a work plan that explains the focus and goals of each week during the internship program. And go ahead and call it a syllabus.
  • Assign challenging and relevant work. Allowing to your intern to work on challenging and relevant tasks that are recognized by your company is one of the best ways to ensure the success of the internship. Once the work assignment has been done, the intern should be given the necessary documents and tools to allow them to get the necessary information. Ideally, the manager or the mentor should provide a reference checklist that the intern can follow to make sure that they are getting all what they need.

Read concrete tips and big ideas in our white paper, “How You Should Tweak Your Summer Internship Program”

  • Define a communication plan. The manager should define the communication plan with the intern. For example, an intern might be expected to send a written report to their manager at the end of each week. This will not only help the intern to improve their communication skills, but it will help move projects along by documenting progress. Also, this would raise red flags if they hit a roadblock. Some interns are required to write a paper for college credit at the end of the internship program. If that’s the case, they will have a lot of materials from their weekly communication.

Intern onboarding gone wrong: Common mistakes employers make

These are five onboarding mistakes that employers often make.

  • Don't support everyone with the same broad brushDon’t treat everybody the same. It’s important to have a process or checklist, but just be careful not to standardize it too much. Tailor the plan to the candidates you’re hiring. If new hires have accolades in sales, for example, don’t put them through a sales training program. Your college talent is now made up of Gen Z, and above all else, they demand authenticity and expect personalization.

Watch College Recruiter’s Steven Rothberg present “New Strategies to Engage Gen Z and Other Modern Candidates”

  • Don’t make interns wait for benefits. There’s nothing to gain by withholding vacation days, health care, etc. Putting interns through a waiting period will make them see you as a cheapskate and can create mistrust. If you don’t trust new employees enough to give them benefits on day one, why are you hiring them?
  • Don’t give unclear expectations. If you throw them to the wolves without ensuring everyone is on the same page, you will find that they don’t perform up to your expectations. This seems like a no brainer but many interns have this exact experience.
  • Don’t exclude interns from the process of designing their training. Don’t just train them by talking at them. Take advantage of that training period to learn what motivates them and where they want to grow. This will engage them and you will discover ways to get the most out of them this summer.
  • Don’t assume you have nothing to learn from your interns. Learning is not a one-way street. There are plenty of interns who have skills that you do not. Learn from them not only to benefit your own development but to increase their sense of inclusion and value.

Signs the internship is going well

According to Radhouani, two things will tell you whether things are on the right track. “Clear communication and measurable progress.”

Another good indicator is how well the intern has integrated within the team. During the weekly meetings with the manager, it should be clear how much progress they are making toward their goals and how they are working with their team. If you successful onboard your interns, then they will have clear objectives and all the necessary information to exceed expectations.

Posted April 03, 2017 by

Gender diversity in tech: one simple part of the solution

 

Gender diversity in tech companies has been a major issue for over two decades now. One part of solution to recruit more women in tech is a simple concept: more effective structured interviews.

The numbers don’t add up. The EEOC reports that women currently make up roughly 56% of the overall workforce, but are underrepresented in tech. Only about 28% of proprietary software jobs currently held by women.

Why is it important to have gender diversity in tech?

The financials tend to resonate more in enterprise companies. Various reports, including one from Catalyst and one from McKinsey, have shown that companies with more female leadership tend to outperform both their market and their rivals. An additional study, from the Peterson Institute for International Economics, showed companies with 30% or more females in leadership outperformed rivals by an average 6% net profit margin.

Women are often associated with being empathetic leaders. This is not true of all women of course, and many men are also empathetic. But if we can generally associated empathy with female leadership, we see a compelling reason to recruit more women in technology. Half of the ten most empathetic technology companies are also the fastest growing. They have grown about 23.3% per year, compared to a weighted average of 5.2% growth of all technology companies, according to one study.

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter and named by RecruitingDaily as a top woman in HR technology worth watching, remarked: “While I know many men who are empathetic, including my husband, I’ve generally seen a higher degree of empathy from female leaders I’ve known and worked with. When you look at these 4x growth stats for companies led from a more empathetic place, and factor in the power of technology in terms of growing a company, having more females at the helm of these types of organizations seems both crucial and a no-brainer.”

Why is diversity in tech seemingly so far behind?

This is often framed as a “pipeline problem,” and that might be true. For example: according to Girls Who Code, 74% of young women (i.e. high-school aged and lower) express interest in STEM (technological) courses and career paths, but by the time decisions need to be made about taking those classes in college, only 18% choose STEM/computer science pathways. (And that’s actually dropped: in the 1980s, women held 37% of computer science degrees, for example.) 

What can be done about the technology gap for women? (more…)

Posted March 06, 2017 by

Diversity recruitment lessons from law enforcement: Inside the research

 

College Recruiter is introducing a regular feature called “Inside the research”. We will dive into recent research that can be applied to practitioners in recruitment, HR and talent acquisition. 

Policing and race relations are topics of national interest these days. A study from the Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice1 looked at how several law enforcement agencies market their opportunities to communities of color, and their success in diversity recruitment. Drawing a parallel between police and corporate recruitment highlights just how much effort recruiters must put into hiring diversity. That is, if you want results. Here are six lessons that recruiters can glean from this study.

Understand that institutional racism is around us. “Police agencies have been criticized for what is perceived as institutional racism in the recruitment, retention and promotion of Blacks and other racial minorities,” write the authors of the study, titled “Recruiting for Diversity in Law Enforcement: An Evaluation of Practices Used by State and Local Agencies.” While police have been in the hot seat, recruiters of all sectors and industries must turn the mirror upon themselves. Many would agree that institutional racism exists in business across the board.

Put your money where your mouth is. The authors write, “Today’s typical police recruitment campaign is managed almost exclusively using advertisements in those news publications that cater to the greater (White) community at large.” As a recruiter you might be thinking, but we advertise across many different channels, including Facebook, which is very diverse! That may be true, but try doing a little exercise. Compare all the places where you advertise, and how much money you spend on each channel, to your recruitment goals. If you have a goal around diversity, you have to put your advertising dollars where your mouth is.

Police agencies desperately want to hire diversity, precisely because they know they have a trust problem with communities of color, particularly the African American community. The study points out what should be common sense: “When citizens see that a police department has personnel who reflect a cross-section of the community, they have greater confidence that police offers will understand their problems and concerns” (Streit, 2001). The study found, however, that these agencies are just not putting their money where their mouths are. There are points of contact in the community where recruiters may connect with more of their targeted candidates—churches, hair salons, shopping malls, for example—and yet the agencies studied here did not take advantage these opportunities.

Be aware of hypocrisy. Companies who include diversity in their core values, and especially companies who flaunt their inclusive environments, would be wise to check their authenticity. The study reminds us of what we already know about policing: “when community partnerships are seen as being superficial, agencies risk alienating candidates who might be aware of hypocrisy where such activities are inconsistent with reality.” (Syrett & Lammiman, 2004). You should communicate your commitment to diversity, but just saying it doesn’t make it so. Effective diversity recruitment makes it so. (more…)

Posted February 27, 2017 by

College Recruiter CEO to speak about gender diversity at NACE conference

 

Minneapolis, MN (February 25, 2017)—Interactive recruitment media company College Recruiter announced today that CEO Faith Rothberg will speak at this year’s conference for the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), held June 6-9 in Las Vegas. The NACE conference is for college career services and college recruiters to make new connections, develop new insight and skills and discover new business solutions. Rothberg will speak about diversifying the workforce.

According to Rothberg, “When you pretend gender diversity doesn’t matter, your bottom line suffers. So recruiting and retaining women isn’t just the right thing to do – it is essential to increasing your profitability.  Including women in all areas of your organization adds valuable differing insights to solve our tough business problems.”

As CEO of a technology driven business, Rothberg has an inspirational personal story to share. Her career has remained at the intersection between business and technology, both of which were male-dominated fields when she entered them and, unfortunately, remain so in 2017. After earning her MBA, Rothberg became a manufacturing information technology consultant in a job that required working out of construction trailers at manufacturing facilities. Rothberg now leads College Recruiter and takes pride in helping launch the early careers of college students, including thousands of young women. STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) are heavily dominated by men, and Rothberg will share about the challenges she has faced while climbing to the top.

Although less attention is paid on this topic outside of STEM, many non-STEM industries are just as lacking in gender diversity. Rothberg will identify the industries and fields that are lagging, and discuss some of the research around why organizations need to diversify their talent pipeline. She will speak directly to recruiters who influence that entry point into the pipeline, as well as retention strategies.

Rothberg’s focus for the discussion will go beyond merely discussing the problem. She will bring specific examples of how small, medium, and large organizations have successfully improved their recruitment and retention of women. She will discuss the implementation of innovative programs that will improve their recruitment and retention of female students and recent graduates.

About College Recruiter

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent grad deserves a great career. They believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience. Their interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers. College Recruiter is the leading, interactive, recruitment media company used by college students and recent graduates to find great careers. Their clients are primarily colleges, universities, and employers who want to recruit dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year.

About NACE

Established in 1956, NACE connects more than 7,600 college career services professionals at nearly 2,000 colleges and universities nationwide, more than 3,000 university relations and recruiting professionals, and the business affiliates that serve this community. NACE forecasts hiring and trends in the job market; tracks starting salaries, recruiting and hiring practices, and student attitudes and outcomes; and identifies best practices and benchmarks.

Posted November 16, 2016 by

Diversity bonuses: do they work?

Employee happy with his bonusCompanies who understand the importance of hiring diverse employees are pouring millions into their Diversity and Inclusion efforts. One such effort is to offer a “diversity bonus” to recruiters or employees who make referrals. The results are mixed. In 2015, Intel started offering $4,000 to employees who refer women or minorities. It may have played a part in their increase in diverse hiring. Facebook tried to incentivize recruiters to recruit more diversity, and it doesn’t seem to be working. A third example isn’t actually a bonus but a mandate. The NFL’s Rooney Rule requires teams to interview minority candidates for coaching and senior football operation jobs. When they put the policy in place, there were six head coaches of color. Over 12 years, the NFL added 14. This does seem like progress, albeit a bit slow moving.

Some love the idea of paying out for minority and women candidates. Some say it just doesn’t feel right. If you decide to invest in this approach, make sure to think through the risks and how to do it right.

(more…)

Posted October 26, 2016 by

Affinity groups: value to employee and employer

Group of different birdsAt a recent People of Color Job Fair, employers touted their welcoming workplaces. Many referred to their affinity groups as how they are inclusive of diversity. If offered genuinely, affinity groups can bring value to both the employee and the employer.

Value to employees

  1. Take a rest from the code-switching. It can be lonely working in an office full of people who don’t look like you. Code-switching all day can be exhausting. (For those less familiar, “code-switching” is a daily practice for people who navigate two cultures. They adjust their dialect/language/mannerisms to fit into the surrounding culture without being questioned. NPR has a nice illustration of code-switching.) Affinity groups can offer relief for anyone who needs a space where it feels safer to express yourself freely. Groups are meant to bring people together who share a common interest or culture. Examples are veterans, women, African Americans and GLBT affinity groups. It’s about solidarity (“Why Women’s Spaces Matter”).
  2. Build your network. In your affinity group, you will probably find yourself networking with colleagues outside your immediate team. This can be helpful to your career. Especially for entry-level and younger employees, more experienced colleagues can give you advice and point you to resources.
  3. Build new skills. You don’t have to wait for a formal company training to learn new skills. Informal group discussions offer excellent opportunities to learn new tools, technology or best practices that can make you more effective and valuable at your company.

Value to employer

  1. Boost retention of employees. Engagement is king. For those who claim that affinity groups look more like segregation than inclusion, consider how relieving it can feel for an employee to join an affinity group and feel at home with other colleagues who “get them.” That employee, in turn, may feel more positive about her work, thus stick around longer. In addition, group members can collaborate with management to discuss issues of recruitment and retention, and shed light on how to improve your practices. In this example, GLBT employees helped shape their organization’s benefit policy for domestic partnerships, making them more competitive.
  2. Get new consumer insights. Affinity groups can collaborate with management to discuss marketing solutions for consumers from their own community.
  3. Low-cost learning and development. Affinity group members share resources with each other, best practices, and new tools and technology. This no-cost informal learning is a nice supplement to expensive formal company training.
  4. Reap the benefits of diversity. Multiple studies point to the increased productivity and profits of diverse companies. However, if your work environment isn’t inclusive, these benefits remain out of reach. If managed well, affinity groups can be part of your inclusion strategy.

Doing it right

  1. You can’t force affinity groups. They must be employee-led, and membership can’t be forced. If employees feel that the group has been too packaged without their input, you lose their buy-in and engagement.
  2. Give it time. The longer your organization has affinity groups, the more likely you will be able to align them to business goals.

Veteran’s Day is November 11! Here are a few companies who have created affinity groups for veteransWant to keep up on the latest career and job search tips and trends for recent college grads? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.