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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 09, 2016 by

Common networking mistakes to avoid

Dishonesty, moral dilemma, liar photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As college students and recent graduates enter the workforce, they will likely meet people who can assist them with their job searches. When these opportunities arise, job seekers be prepared to take advantage of them. While some job seekers may not be the most outgoing in terms of personality, they can still be effective when networking. However, if students and grads don’t understand how to network, they can hurt their chances of building important relationships that can advance their careers. So as job seekers attend networking events, they must be mindful of what not to do. Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University, highlights common networking mistakes to avoid.

“Blindly reaching out without knowing basic information about a person, the kind of details usually found through a quick Google or LinkedIn search, is a red flag signaling a bad start to the networking experience. A wishful connection will be less likely to engage if college students or prospective hires don’t bring any background knowledge to the table.

Expecting a networking connection will “tell me what to do.” Before reaching out, know the information you want. It’s helpful to have an informal script handy. “My name is Sue Smith; I’m a business major and art history minor interested in an entry-level job working in the cosmetic industry in New York. I’m hoping to secure a summer internship. Could you share with me how you got into the industry and any suggestions or recommendations you might have?”

Thinking the number of connections matters. Networking is about relationships, not numbers. Targeted outreach to people who share common interests makes networking effective. Two people may connect in an unlimited number of ways, such as graduating from the same school, being from the same hometown, choosing a similar academic path, or by an interest in a particular career. Whatever it is, a real connection matters.

The first outreach is inappropriate or unprofessional. Treat networking opportunities as professional conversations. It’s easier to move from formal to casual than vice-versa. Having good manners and dressing appropriately (which is very different if you’re interested in a career in journalism versus a career on Wall Street) is critical in creating the first impression that builds your reputation.”

Want to learn more about networking mistakes? Head to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

With more than 25 years of experience in the private sector, nearly half assisting organizations with recruiting, interviewing, and hiring top talent, Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has an insider’s understanding of what employers are seeking and helping students and recent grads showcase their academic skills and personal experiences. Wake Forest’s one, university-wide employer relations team means Summers has experience with and supports the employment search for students in all academic areas, teaching and empowering them to articulate the value of their education for today’s employers.

Posted July 21, 2016 by

Social media helps students and graduates build relationships

Social, connection, laptop photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Today, social media provides us with the chance to communicate personally and professionally. For college students and recent graduates who are more interested in the latter, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook are all popular platforms to market themselves. They are places to build valuable relationships with professionals, employers, and fellow job seekers. Andrea St. James, Director of the Career Development Center at Western New England University, discusses how students can establish relationships on social media sites, and Michaeline Shuman, Director of Career Development at Susquehanna University, shares how social media sites can connect students and recent grads to college alumni.

“Social media works best as an initial contact or follow-up to solidify a new relationship. When connecting first (through social media), though, students should explain who they are. When you first pursue a connection, share how you are connected with the person (i.e. went to the same school, or common connections). Then share information about yourself that starts to put a face to a name, i.e. major, experience, direction, goals, and finally what you are looking to gather from that person.”

“(Social media) is great for connecting students with their university’s alumni and asking them for advice. By asking for advice, alumni are put in a position to say yes rather than no. All professionals have stories about how they got into their current roles, strategies for students on the job market, etc. Once a rapport is developed, students can ask their new networking connections about job opportunities or additional resources.”

Students and recent college graduates seeking opportunities to help build their professional network can connect with employers, career specialists and other motivated professionals through the many different social media channels College Recruiter uses to engage with both job seekers and employers. Check out our College Recruiter LinkedIn group, our College Recruiter LinkedIn page, and follow College Recruiter on Twitter. Also, don’t forget to leverage resources like the College Recruiter YouTube page, which offers additional career insight. When you find content you like, share that with your social media channels to help create discussion and engagement, which can help build your professional network and create those coveted relationships that can help students and recent college graduates advance in their career.

While students can use social media to begin the networking process, they shouldn’t end there. Don’t be afraid to invite connections to connect face-to-face for coffee or lunch. Ask connections for an informational interview to learn more about your desired future careers. Take relationships to the next level.

Using social media to network? Get more advice on our blog and don’t forget to follow us on our various social media channels, including Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Andrea St. James, Director of the Career Development Center at Western New England University

Andrea St. James, Director of the Career Development Center at Western New England University

Andrea St. James is Director of the Career Development Center at Western New England University in Springfield, Massachusetts, where she assists students and alumni with career planning, occupational exploration, job search strategies, and graduate school applications. She has a BSBA in Marketing and an MBA, both from Western New England University.

 

 

 

 

 

Michaeline Shuman, Director of Career Development at Susquehanna University

Michaeline Shuman, Director of Career Development at Susquehanna University

Michaeline Shuman is Assistant Provost for Postgraduate Outcomes and Director of the Career Development Center at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, where she helps students identify internship and job opportunities through networking and preparation programs, on-campus recruiting programs, and career and graduate school advising. She received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Work at Albright College and a Master of Science Degree in Education from Alfred University.

Posted March 12, 2016 by

Preparing introverts and extroverts for the job search

Extrovert or introvert as a choice of different belief courtesy of Shutterstock.com

kentoh/Shutterstock.com

Introverts and extroverts handle things in very different ways. School counselors’ job is to help all of their students, and one of the best ways to do this is to know how introverts and extroverts prefer to do things. When preparing them to leave college and enter the job market, there are several things a counselor can do that will help tailor students’ paths with their personalities.

Discover which they are

Before school counselors begin counseling students based on their personalities, they have to determine if students are introverts or extroverts. Unless counselors have a longstanding and personal connection with students, it is probably a good idea to give them some tests to help determine their personality style. Tests — such as this one from Psychology Today — will help determine whether students are introverts or extroverts. Often students themselves are not aware of their own styles, and doing the test will be beneficial to both students and counselors.

Inform students how their personalities can impact their jobs

Many people do not know the difference between introverts and extroverts, and they often don’t know which category they fall into. Once school counselors have determined which one students are through some tests, they can begin telling students about what it means. Explain to students how extroverts and introverts may tackle different scenarios, and how they prefer to do things.

Choose the right application method

Now that both counselors and students understand the latter’s personality type, they can begin tailoring the application process for when they are looking for jobs. For example, counselors can tell extroverts that face-to-face interviews are better for them, since they are more outgoing, while introverts may be better at cover letters and resumes.

However, some application types cannot be avoided; in this case, counselors should help students improve on things that are not necessarily their strengths. For example, here are some ways that introverts can prepare for interviews.

In addition, school counselors can steer them towards jobs more suited to their personalities. As an example, an introvert may not be best suited for a sales position job, or one requiring a lot of group work. On the other hand, an extrovert is probably not suited for a job requiring them to work long hours alone.

College sports male volleyball finals in Milan courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Paolo Bona/Shutterstock.com

Suggest outside activities

Since a lot of college students do not have work experience they can add to their resumes, outside activities can help bolster them. Give students some options for things they can get involved with that will be suited for their personality types, along with their interests. The more activities they can get involved with, the better their resumes will look.

Encourage them to explore outside their style

While it is a good idea for students to play to their strengths, that does not mean they should avoid anything that makes them uncomfortable. School counselors should encourage students to keep an open mind, and to try some things not necessarily suited to their personality types. At some point along their career paths, students are probably going to do something outside their normal comfort zones, and by expanding their horizons now, they will be better equipped to handle it in the future.

Hopefully this short list will help school counselors tailor the counseling of their students. Helping students realize what their strengths are and how they can utilize them is a great tool for after they graduate and will help guide them for years to come.

Need more tips for your job search? Learn more at College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Tony Newton

Tony Newton, guest writer

Tony Newton is a contributing author for @DailyKos and @NationOfChange His favorite subjects are social awareness campaigns and public policy in pedagogy.

Posted December 08, 2015 by

Common job interview questions and their answers

view of a young woman during a job interview

View of a young woman during a job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

An interview is generally a meeting between a potential employer and a job candidate. In certain cases, multiple people will interview you simultaneously. This is usually the case when applying for a high level position or when the competition for a certain job is really tough. No matter the type of interview, the interview itself is an achievement to pat yourself on the back for without getting carried away. In today’s job market, getting an interview is not always the easiest thing to do. (more…)

Posted February 20, 2015 by

Interview Skills: The Answers Recruiters Want to Hear

young female applicant during job interview

Young female applicant during job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Why do you want to work here?

Where do you see yourself in five years?

Whether you come from a career technical institute or whether you hold a college degree, these standard interview questions can be tough to answer. And though you may have heard them before, perhaps you’re not sure how to answer or why an interviewer asks them.

So here are a few tips and tricks to correctly answering a recruiter’s questions. (more…)

Posted November 13, 2014 by

Looking for Your Next Job While Networking? 3 Ways to Make the Most of Your Opportunities

Business woman touching virtual display. Business and technology concept

Business woman touching virtual display. Business and technology concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Networking is an opportunity to meet new people who can potentially become contacts.  As a job seeker, networking gives you the chance to talk about your job search.  With the right contact(s), you can take another step in finding a new job.  So, when opportunities arise to network, how can you take advantage of them?  Consider these three ways to make the most of your opportunities. (more…)

Posted November 03, 2014 by

College Admissions Essays: What to Leave Behind and What to Keep

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

An entire book could be written about your life. Regardless of whether or not you think it would be a particularly interesting book, the fact remains that you’ve had a lot of experiences that you could include in your admissions essays. Deciding on which parts of your life to highlight can be difficult, so follow these steps to guide you as you write your essays.

To make things easier, let go of the bad stuff first. Here’s what can be left behind. (more…)

Posted August 11, 2014 by

7 Common Blunders To Avoid During Phone Interviews

Young woman showing body language during a phone interview on a white mobile phone

Young woman showing body language during a phone interview on a white mobile phone. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Many at times, people get confused and worried when they receive a sudden phone interview call from a company. It is mainly because phone interviews are often conducted without any prior notification or a predetermined time. Since people can’t keep themselves mentally prepared for the interview all day long, they usually end up making terrible blunders during the 5-10mins phone call.

Phone interviews are conducted for numerous reasons. For instance, a company might conduct a phone interview when they have a huge pile of short-listed CVs and they don’t have enough room, space or time to conduct an interview in the office. It is also possible that the company may be looking for a person for the customer support or telesales job in which one must have good communication or telesales skills. (more…)

Posted July 30, 2014 by

Want to Use LinkedIn as an Advantage to Find an Internship or a Job? 7 Steps You Can Take

For those of you trying to find an internship or a job on LinkedIn, the following post has seven steps you can take to use the site to your advantage.

Many college students, recent graduates and young professional are starting to see the power of LinkedIn. However, the one thing they learn very quickly is that they don’t yet have the quantity or quality of contacts necessary to leverage the world’s largest professional network. The best of them, however, don’t let that stop them from using

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Posted July 29, 2014 by

Are You a Recent Graduate Searching for Jobs on LinkedIn? Connect with Alumni Using These 5 Tips

As a recent graduate now searching for jobs, using LinkedIn to network with alumni could help you establish connections beneficial to your career.  In the following post, learn five tips to connect with alumni on the site.

The university I attended was large, but a few years removed from college I still feel a common bond and sense of purpose whenever I meet a fellow alum. For students and grads, those alumni connections provide even more value: alumni connections are an important resource that will accelerate your networking, learning and career opportunities:

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