• Diversity in the workplace: recruitment tips and tactics Part 2 [expert panel discussion]

    July 31, 2017 by

     

    As demographics change in the United States, including at college campuses, we should be seeing more diversity in the workplace. So why is the needle moving so slowly? In today’s panel discussion with College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, we explore strategies for talent acquisition professionals to improve their diversity recruitment. Today our discussion touched on what an inclusive recruitment process looks like, differences between the government and private sectors, and concrete tips for talent acquisition professionals. Continue Reading

  • Fall 2017 college recruitment trends and challenges [white paper]

    July 27, 2017 by

     

    As the 2017-18 school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. College Recruiter teamed up with our friends at NAS Recruitment Innovation to create a white paper chock full of insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs this fall. Continue Reading

  • Diversity recruitment: Big impact strategies and mistakes Part 1 [expert panel discussion]

    July 24, 2017 by

     

    As demographics change in the United States, including at college campuses, employers should have more diverse new hires. So why is the needle moving so slowly? In today’s panel discussion with College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, we explore strategies for talent acquisition professionals to improve their diversity recruitment. Our discussion touches on mistakes recruiters make, big impact strategies and becoming culturally confident.

    We were joined by Alexandra Levit, a workplace consultant; Toni Newborn, J.D., Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at City of St. Paul; and Bruce Soltys, Director of University Relations at Travelers. This is Part 1 of our discussion. Next week we will publish part 2, which discusses what an inclusive recruitment process looks like, differences between the government and private sectors, and concrete tips for talent acquisition professionals. Continue Reading

  • Resume rules: Avoid common mistakes and stand out [video]

    March 31, 2017 by

     

    College Recruiter spoke with Joanne Meehl, President and primary Job Coach & Career Consultant at Joanne Meehl Career Services.  Joanne is part of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is made up of professionals around the country with top notch advice for recruiters and HR professionals, or for entry level job seekers. Here, Joanne shares her insight into resume rules that help college students and grads avoid mistakes and stand out to the applicant tracking systems. Continue Reading

  • Latest rules for resume writing from career consultant Joanne Meehl [video]

    March 24, 2017 by

     

    Joanne Meehl knows the rules resume writing and has excellent advice. She is president and primary Job Coach & Career Consultant at Joanne Meehl Career Services.  Today Joanne shared her insight with College Recruiter, and you can scroll down to watch a video of our discussion. This is Part 1 of 2 of Joanne’s resume writing tips. A week from now Joanne will join us again to share more about applicant tracking systems and common mistakes that college students make when writing a resume. Continue Reading

  • Career and job competencies of liberal arts graduates [video]

    March 20, 2017 by

     

    There is a public perception that liberal arts graduates are somehow less valuable. Dr. Ascan Koerner with the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota will tell you why the opposite is true. College Recruiter connected Dr. Koerner with Todd Raphael of ERE Media to learn what his team is doing to make sure employers understand the relevancy of liberal arts students and graduates. A video of Todd Raphael’s and Dr. Koerner’s discussion is below. 

    According to Dr. Koerner, we have seen more public discussion in the last 5-10 years about the value of higher education, generally speaking. The arguments for what is valuable have primarily focused on STEM education. (That is, science, technology, engineering and math.) Some believe that in order to be competitive in an international job market, one really has to be focused on STEM. At one end of the spectrum, we see the Governor of Kentucky, who has questioned why universities even have liberal arts programs at all. This makes liberal arts students—and their parents—nervous. Dr. Koerner says that at the University of Minnesota, students are asking how liberal is helpful in their careers. He says their belief in the value of liberal arts has never wavered, “but the question hasn’t been posed to us in such stark terms.”

    Employers already value liberal arts, but they don’t realize it

    Overall, employers already know the value of liberal arts. The problem is, they don’t recognize it as liberal arts. When you ask employers, for example, what they value, they cite competencies that are quintessential typical liberal arts. At the top of their lists are analytical/critical thinking, communication, leadership, ethnical decision making, and engaging diversity.” Employers know what they value, but the job candidates—the liberal arts students—aren’t always good at explaining their own value. So while colleges and universities bear some of the burden of convincing employers, students bear most of that responsibility. A philosophy major may embody the exact skills needed but when you ask him how his education prepared him for a career in corporate America, he has a hard time. That is why it is so important to engage and prepare students for answering those questions. When the students eloquently explain their own competencies, that is more convincing to an employer than if the institution were to explain the overall value of liberal arts grads.  Continue Reading

  • Recruitment marketing across social media: Best practices

    March 08, 2017 by

     

    Many employers have embraced recruitment marketing across social media. Here we’d like to share best practices and answer common questions.

    If college students don’t use Facebook as much anymore, should employers even consider branding on Facebook to reach millennials?

    According to Fluent – a customer acquisition platform – in 2016, 41% of millennials use Facebook every day*. That generation was part of the days when you had to sign up with Facebook using your college email address. While the use of Facebook has since changed, millennials are using it to keep in touch with friends and family, as well as receive news.

    The organic reach of brands on Facebook has been reduced dramatically. Nowadays, you have to “pay if you want to play.” Therefore, companies have to allocate a budget to advertise on this platform. Even though organic reach is almost nonexistent, a company should post regularly (2-3 times a week) when advertising. Here is why:

    If your company is sponsoring posts (ads) and candidates click on these posts, they are sent to a landing page outside of Facebook. But candidates can still visit your company’s Facebook page. If that’s the case, your page has to grab the visitor’s attention. If there is no sign of recent content or content of value, the visitor will not likely take interest in the ad or your company.

    One great thing about advertising on Facebook is how granular companies can target candidates. You can focus on certain universities, majors, graduation date and more. It’s easy and relatively inexpensive to brand your company as an employer to the most relevant audience.

    *Note: That same study shared that the older millennial generation (ages 25-34) use Facebook most in comparison to the younger millennials (ages 18-24). 

    Where else should companies invest in social media marketing?

    Facebook may not be the best channel to use for recruitment if you’re not paying to play, but Instagram and Snapchat are two channels that can support your efforts to reach college students and millennials. These social networks can assist with attracting these candidates because both are all about the visuals. Leverage them for your employer branding efforts and tell your company’s story through videos and photos, but don’t forget about Snapchat Geo-Filters.
    Continue Reading

  • College Recruiter CEO to speak about gender diversity at NACE conference

    February 27, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (February 25, 2017)—Interactive recruitment media company College Recruiter announced today that CEO Faith Rothberg will speak at this year’s conference for the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), held June 6-9 in Las Vegas. The NACE conference is for college career services and college recruiters to make new connections, develop new insight and skills and discover new business solutions. Rothberg will speak about diversifying the workforce.

    According to Rothberg, “When you pretend gender diversity doesn’t matter, your bottom line suffers. So recruiting and retaining women isn’t just the right thing to do – it is essential to increasing your profitability.  Including women in all areas of your organization adds valuable differing insights to solve our tough business problems.”

    As CEO of a technology driven business, Rothberg has an inspirational personal story to share. Her career has remained at the intersection between business and technology, both of which were male-dominated fields when she entered them and, unfortunately, remain so in 2017. After earning her MBA, Rothberg became a manufacturing information technology consultant in a job that required working out of construction trailers at manufacturing facilities. Rothberg now leads College Recruiter and takes pride in helping launch the early careers of college students, including thousands of young women. STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) are heavily dominated by men, and Rothberg will share about the challenges she has faced while climbing to the top.

    Although less attention is paid on this topic outside of STEM, many non-STEM industries are just as lacking in gender diversity. Rothberg will identify the industries and fields that are lagging, and discuss some of the research around why organizations need to diversify their talent pipeline. She will speak directly to recruiters who influence that entry point into the pipeline, as well as retention strategies.

    Rothberg’s focus for the discussion will go beyond merely discussing the problem. She will bring specific examples of how small, medium, and large organizations have successfully improved their recruitment and retention of women. She will discuss the implementation of innovative programs that will improve their recruitment and retention of female students and recent graduates.

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent grad deserves a great career. They believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience. Their interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers. College Recruiter is the leading, interactive, recruitment media company used by college students and recent graduates to find great careers. Their clients are primarily colleges, universities, and employers who want to recruit dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year.

    About NACE

    Established in 1956, NACE connects more than 7,600 college career services professionals at nearly 2,000 colleges and universities nationwide, more than 3,000 university relations and recruiting professionals, and the business affiliates that serve this community. NACE forecasts hiring and trends in the job market; tracks starting salaries, recruiting and hiring practices, and student attitudes and outcomes; and identifies best practices and benchmarks.

  • Creating mobile job applications: Experts share best practices [video]

    February 22, 2017 by

     

    What changes should an organization make to ensure their job application is truly mobile friendly? College Recruiter spoke with Chrissy Toskos, Vice President Campus Recruiting at Prudential Financial.  Chrissy shared how Prudential allows, expects and accommodates mobile job applications, and the success they have seen because of their changes. We also are including insight from College Recruiter founder and president Steven Rothberg, who adds a birds-eye view of employers trying to attract entry-level applicants with mobile applications, and how they measure their success.

    Read the blog post below, or watch the video here:

     

    What changes are necessary to make a good mobile job application?

    Chrissy Toskos: Prudential was an early adopter of mobile applications, having introduced it in January 2015 when less than 20% of Fortune 500 companies had this capability. The mobile application was launched with the intent to provide an easier and more modern way for students to apply for internships and full-time positions at Prudential.  We created a student friendly application by reducing the number of fields that the students are asked to complete which resulted in a shorter application and significant increase in applications.

    We eliminated duplicate content and created specific parameters to ensure that the information captured from each candidate is accurate and specific. By tailoring the language and reorganizing the application to the student perspective, we found a significant increase in submissions and accuracy of completed applications.

    Steven Rothberg: Over the past two years, the percentage of traffic to College Recruiter from smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices has increased from 15 to 50 percent. The huge and likely permanent increase in the share of traffic coming via mobile versus websites is only exasperating a problem that many employers have.

    Do you notice a difference in quality between non-mobile and mobile job applications? 

    Chrissy Toskos: We have not seen a difference in the quality of applications via mobile device vs non mobile device since the processes mirror one another. After applying via mobile device, students are asked to submit their resume online to fully complete the application process.

    There’s no difference in quality between the mobile and non-mobile versions of the Prudential Application. Both application platforms provide applicants with a user friendly look and feel when searching, applying and submitting an application. The only functional difference is for applicants that need to upload a new resume in that the mobile application will not allow for resume uploads. Therefore, applicants need to save their submissions and later access their account via a non-mobile device to fully complete and submit their application. Once their resume is updated in the system, applicants can apply to jobs with ease via their mobile devices. 

    What challenges come with mobile job applications and how do you respond?

    Chrissy Toskos: We have found that we may have to reach out to candidates with a reminder to upload their resumes after they have applied.  Other than the follow-up this has been a seamless process allowing us to provide a more accessible way for students to apply to positions at Prudential.

    As mentioned above, one of our ongoing challenges is the inability to upload a new resume to their profile. We are currently monitoring the system functionality to solve for this current challenge.

    Steven Rothberg: The majority of employers make little to no effort to accurately and automatically track their sources of candidate traffic, applicants, and hires. Many rely upon candidate self-identification such as “how did you hear about us” drop-down boxes or, even worse, asking candidates during an interview. Studies show that drop-down boxes are very likely to provide inaccurate data, and it is likely that interview stage questions provide even worse data. These employers would be better off collecting no data than collecting data which is that inaccurate.

    Even if the employer is trying to automatically and accurately track their applicant sources, it is very difficult to do so accurately when candidates use mobile devices. One problem is that it is likely they will conduct their initial research on their mobile but then come back hours, days, or even weeks later on a laptop or another device that allows them to upload a resume. Tracking across multiple devices is very difficult and often impossible.

    Another and lesser known problem is that many tracking systems rely upon the use of cookies but those are blocked by mobile apps and many of the most popular mobile browsers such as Safari. Simply put, if your tracking systems rely on cookies, then you aren’t able to accurately track mobile traffic.

     

    Chrissy Toskos

    Chrissy Toskos is the Vice President Campus Recruiting at Prudential Financial. She leads the transformation of Prudential’s multi-faceted campus recruiting strategy to identify and invest in the long-term engagement of top talent while providing innovative practices for building a leadership pipeline for the company. Connect with Chrissy on LinkedIn.

     

     

    Steven RothbergAbout Steven Rothberg: Steven’s entrepreneurial spirit was evident from an early age. Disciplined in fifth grade for selling candy during math class and in college for running a massive fantasy hockey league, Steven managed to channel his passions into something more productive after graduate school. A fully recovered lawyer, Steven founded the business that morphed into College Recruiter and now, as its visionary, helps to create and refine the company’s strategy and leads its business development efforts.

     

    Want to stay on top of other expert advice around college recruitment? Connect with College on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube.

  • Spotlight on success: CEB’s summer internship program

    February 20, 2017 by

     

    As Head of Global Talent Acquisition at CEB, Teresa Green knows something about successful summer internship programs. She shared with College Recruiter about how they pull it off every year, and what she recommends as best practices.

    What does CEB’s summer internship program look like?

    CEB’s internship program provides students with hands-on work experience, allowing them to gain business acumen while supporting CEB’s mission to address senior leaders’ most pressing challenges. CEB hosts a ten-week summer internship program for rising college seniors in several of our U.S. office locations.  Interns are placed in one of two business communities; research or business development. Research interns examine common challenges faced by business leaders and produce solutions that help those business leaders to take action.  Business development interns assist with engaging senior-level executives in our services, prospecting and scheduling sales meetings. Each internship gives students a glimpse into the entry level roles within these communities and a chance to receive a full-time position at the end of the summer.

    Our interns make an impact, not coffee.

    We’re proud to say that interns make an impact – not coffee. Their work is tied to business objectives so we are able to measure the positive impact interns have on the organization.  At the same time, CEB makes an impact on the students’ development, ensuring they are starting their career on the right track. Guaranteeing interns gain valuable work experience, allowing them to establish business relationships and helping them identify possible long-term career opportunities are important objectives of CEB’s program.

    Every year we ask for feedback from our interns and, unanimously, they say that CEB hosts a well-rounded intern program.  Throughout the summer students participate in learning and development workshops, a speaker series with our executive leadership, community service projects and various networking activities. Our diversity employee groups also host external speakers, social events and training activities that interns partake in across the summer. And there is always time for a little fun.  In past years we’ve planned ice cream socials, bowling nights, baseball games and boat cruises for interns to hangout outside of the office.

    An example of an intern who went on to succeed at CEB Continue Reading