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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 06, 2016 by

Social media enhances recruiting efforts

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Social media can enhance the recruiting efforts of hiring managers. Because college students and recent graduates love social media, recruiters should use it to highlight their companies in a positive light. That doesn’t just mean the work itself but also the company culture. One company using social media this way in college recruiting is Lockton.

More than 5,600 professionals at Lockton provide 48,000 clients around the world with risk management, insurance, employee benefits consulting, and retirement services that improve their businesses. From its founding in 1966 in Kansas City, Missouri, Lockton has attracted entrepreneurial professionals who have driven its growth to become the largest privately held, independent insurance broker in the world and 10th largest overall. For seven consecutive years, Business Insurance magazine has recognized Lockton as a “Best Place to Work in Insurance.”

Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton, discusses how her company uses social media in college recruiting to reflect its company culture.

“At Lockton, we recently launched two social media programs to help recruit college students.

First, we created the hashtag #LocktonLife and began using it on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and in all of our college recruiting materials. Our goal is to show college students what it’s really like working at Lockton and that insurance is more than writing policies and processing claims. Photos and posts with #LocktonLife show associates giving back to the community, having fun inside and outside of work (think ping pong and Mardi Gras), and engaging in wellness activities like Lockton 5k events.

Then, we invited associates from across the country to join us as brand ambassadors. Using their own personal social media networks, these brand ambassadors shared even more photos and posts using #LocktonLife and encouraged others in their offices to do the same. We now have about 30 brand ambassadors in cities like Washington, D.C., Denver, Houston, and Los Angeles posting pictures of charity events, happy hours, team-building activities, and more.

On Friday March 4th, we hosted Lockton University Day at our headquarters in Kansas City. Students met, mingled, and learned from young Lockton Associates and leaders, and were encouraged to post on social media using #LocktonLife and tagging us (@Lockton, @LocktonBenefits, and @Lockton_Retire) for the chance to win fun prizes. We hope our social media campaign added some excitement to the event and helped spread the word that Lockton is a rewarding, fast-paced, and fun place to work.”

If you’re looking for more information on using social media for college recruiting, visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Photo of Kelly Dippold

Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton

Kelly Dippold has more than 10 years of experience in recruiting and human relations in both the telecommunications and insurance industries. She joined Lockton in 2010, where she leads teams of college recruiters and has excelled in the company’s entrepreneurial, competitive, and empowering culture. Kelly earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas. Her professional designations and affiliations include Professional in Human Resources (PHR), SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) and Member, National SHRM.

Posted April 01, 2016 by

Using LinkedIn and Twitter for college recruiting

Social media icons Linkedin, Twitter, etc. on smartphone screen close up courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Social media can be a valuable tool in college recruiting. With many college students and recent graduates on social media, college recruiters could find the best job candidates and learn more about them. LinkedIn and Twitter are two social networking websites that benefit recruiters. Amera Fattah, Owner and Chief Executive Officer of Eventistry, discusses both sites from a recruiter’s perspective and offers advice to college students and recent grads.

“LinkedIn continues to be the top social media platform to recruit college graduates. We are surprised how many recent graduates aren’t jumping on this platform until graduation time, and that’s usually after they learn how hard it is to find good employers to work for. We recommend graduates set up their LinkedIn profiles about two years before graduation. On their profiles, graduates should note they’re seeking internships and also when they are graduating. Many recruiting firms and people working in talent acquisition in corporations will connect with recent grads and bookmark for them later.

Another common way good recruiters pickup candidate leads is on Twitter. This is usually done through content marketing, where a piece of content is put in front of the target market. Sometimes, we add a job posting on Twitter or an article such as “millennial resume mistakes,” and we pick up many leads from recent graduates seeking employment. New graduates need to keep their heads on a swivel; on social media they are going to find opportunities flashing by their faces even when they’re not looking. Ultimately, this is really how social media works when attracting college graduates for this generation. Grads may be following the Yelp \ Talia Jane trend on Twitter and then see a job posting roll through their feeds, so pay attention.”

Want more advice on using social media for college recruiting? Follow our blog to learn more about the best practices in college recruiting and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Amera Fattah, Owner and Chief Executive Officer of Eventistry

Amera Fattah, Owner and Chief Executive Officer of Eventistry

Amera Fattah is the Owner and Chief Executive Officer of Eventistry – a Metro Detroit event and creative services company. A graduate of Oakland University, she achieved her Bachelors of Arts in Communication and Public Relations with a concentration in biology. She began her career in marketing and media relations and has worked across multiple industries ranging from non-profit organizations, medical technology, real estate, and career services. She is also a board member of the The Art Experience, a non-profit organization dedicated to art therapy of underprivileged and special needs people. Amera is an avid social media specialist and has a passion for marketing, media relations, and creative services with a history of diverse work experiences and focus on millennial entrepreneurship.

Posted March 31, 2016 by

College recruiting ROI

When considering return on investment (ROI) in college recruiting, it’s best to look beyond short-term measures and to consider long-term distal measures. Talent acquisition leaders must really look at the big picture; they can’t lose the vision of the forest for the trees.

This series of four videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadiou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

 


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This series is one set of videos in a larger series featuring WPG experts posted on College Recruiter’s YouTube channel highlighting best practices and a timeline for developing a college recruitment program.

What are the best ways to determine the return on investment in college recruiting? Is it cost per hire? Recruitment cost ratio? Number of hires made? Retention of employees? Number of job offers to acceptances?

There are multiple factors to consider; ultimately, it comes back to “I spent a certain amount of money to achieve a certain result. So where did I start with college recruiting? Why did I start this in the beginning? Am I achieving what I set out to achieve?”

This brings recruiters back to their objectives. If objectives are big-picture oriented, recruiters will want to use distal measures when determining the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs, not just cost measures or efficiency measures based on the current calendar year.

In the next video, WPG experts share a powerful real example of determining the ROI of college recruiting.


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If you spent $5000 to hire a student from a particular university, and that hired individual made a great discovery which added value to your organization, you would probably agree that the $5000 individual was a better investment than many other individuals you hired who cost your college recruiting program much less.

Thus, return on investment is a broad concept which encompasses much more than ratios and efficiency measures. Recruiters should thoroughly examine their objectives for their college recruitment programs. It’s not just about short-term costs.

The third video discusses the importance of considering both efficiency and effectiveness when determining the ROI of college recruitment programs.


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Efficiency is measured by short-term standards; it can be measured by ratios. How many resumes did I obtain from the university? How many candidates were interviewed? How many did we hire? Efficiency measures help recruiters determine whether to adjust the recruiting process or not.

When considering effectiveness, you’re finished with proximal data and are ready to look at distal data and long-term measures. Most HR and recruiting professionals lack patience when it comes to measuring effectiveness. However, sometimes waiting to monitor effectiveness is very important. Defining clear objectives on the front end is crucial, and deciding how to measure and track your objectives at the beginning is just as important. If you don’t, you will not wind up gathering reliable data.

The WorkPlace Group also features an article on its website entitled “Backwards is Forwards” with more information about the ROI of college recruiting.

The final video in this series provides recruiters with final tips related to measuring ROI in college recruiting.


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WPG experts recommend checking out The National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE) website; it has some tools for assisting employers with measuring the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs.

As time goes on, employers learn that students who excel when hired are not the students they might have expected to excel. As time goes on, data provides expectations wrong. This is one reason it’s important to follow data and use it in the planning process. Study the data and measure long-term effectiveness (distal data). This will improve your college recruiting program and overall effectiveness.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted March 30, 2016 by

Narrowing your candidate pool

When recruiting college students and recent grads, it’s important to narrow your candidate pool as you go through the college recruiting process.

This article and accompanying three videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, feature The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner. The videos are part of a 15-video series featuring The WorkPlace Group experts.


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Employers can become overwhelmed by the number of candidates in the candidate pool, depending on the size of the employer and number of internships and entry-level jobs available. The process of narrowing down the pool typically begins with resume review.

Individuals apply in numerous ways: resume books, walk-in applicants, job boards, career fairs, on-campus interviews, etc. Regardless of how candidates apply, resumes must be reviewed. WPG uses a resume checklist which is scientifically constructed. Reviewing resumes objectively allows employers to make clear inferences about candidates’ qualifications.

In high volume situation, particularly for employers with large college recruiting programs, WPG recommends using a web screen to narrow the candidate pool. The web screen allows employers to quickly qualify or disqualify candidates. Next, employers conduct either a phone screen or video-based interviews. This step helps the recruiters get to know the candidates on a deeper level.

After conducting these screening steps, the employer would interview the candidate face-to-face: either an OCI (on-campus interview) or an interview on site at the employer location. This would help the employer to decide whether to hire or not hire the individual and to decide whether to conduct background checks, drug screenings, and other necessary paperwork.


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The qualities employers should be looking for when recruiting candidates can vary depending on the organization and the job function/position. The WorkPlace Group develops an ideal candidate profile featuring the requirements for the position and nice-to-haves when working with employers. Employers should also consider what learning objectives they want to set for each position—what do they want student interns to learn? By working through this process before interviewing candidates, employers can eliminate the problem of hiring the wrong candidates for positions.

The last video offers specific tips for narrowing the candidate pool.


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1) Focus on soft skills in interviews, not technical competencies, when interviewing interns and recent grads. Employers must remember that students are students, not polished professionals.

2) Use situational questions, not behavioral interview questions. Ask “can do, not have done” type questions. Students won’t necessarily be able to draw upon past experience when answering interview questions, but they can explain what they might do hypothetically. They can demonstrate problem solving skills when answering situational questions.

3) When hiring for technical roles, focus assessment at the right level. You can’t expect new grads to be experts in technical areas; you can expect them to have an appropriate level of skill based on their education and level of experience, though. Talk to them about their projects in particular classes to gain insight into their studies.

Always be as rigorous and scientific as possible in the interview process.

 

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted March 24, 2016 by

Selecting schools for college recruiting

When selecting colleges and universities to recruit from, employers must consider a variety of factors.  This article and accompanying video series, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, explore selecting schools for college recruiting in depth and features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

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When selecting schools to recruit from, examine the career services office and resources on campus. Does the career services office offer resume books, on-campus interview opportunities, career fairs, or other opportunities for engagement with students? Not every college or university offers these events. When are these events and opportunities available? The school’s event cycle may not match your recruiting and hiring cycle. How much does the school charge for these services/events? Weigh the costs charged by the university when selecting schools to recruit from as well.

Employers must also consider how many other employers they will be competing against in comparison to the number of students/grads or candidates available. It may be better to be a large fish in a small pond. Unless you have fabulous job offers to present, you might not be able to attract top talent.

When selecting schools for college recruiting, it’s also important to evaluate student enrollment data. If you need to hire MBA graduates, and the university’s MBA program is not one of its better programs, that school may not be the best fit for your college recruiting program.

The next video provides tips about narrowing down their list of schools to recruit from.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Employers should never be afraid to narrow down their target list for selecting schools for college recruiting from year to year. Recruiters will discover that retention is key; you may get terrific talent, but if you can’t retain star employees long-term, a particular college or university might not be the best fit for your company. The longer you recruit, the more historical data you’ll have to fall back on.

Always evaluate and assess your data. Ask the career services office for information about where their students are finding employment. Most career services directors are willing to partner with employers; career services directors who are willing to go above and beyond can help make up for lack of services and events they may not provide. Career services employees can provide employers with the chance to brand themselves on campus and to gain much-needed exposure on campus; they also keep employers in the loop and introduce recruiters to faculty members. Relationships with faculty members prove key in the college recruiting process.

In the last video, experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou discuss the need to adapt recruiting strategy from school to school.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

The WorkPlace Group experts encourage adaptation of strategy based on the situation and school. There may be some times when it’s appropriate to post jobs online only, and some situations when it’s better to have a strong on-campus presence. It’s important to have a tiered structure around college recruiting. Not all colleges and universities are the same; whatever amount of effort you put into college recruiting will determine your outcomes.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted March 23, 2016 by

Fraudulent job postings: TATech Industry Congress

In today’s job board industry, fraudulent job postings are a real threat to both job seekers and talent acquisition professionals. TATech, the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions, is confronting that threat head-on in various ways.

One of the ways TATech is rising to the challenges posed by fraudulent job postings is by offering solutions to members of the job board industry. At the upcoming TATech Industry Congress event in Orlando, Florida (April 16-17, 2016), College Recruiter’s CEO Faith Rothberg will moderate a panel discussion on this very topic. This article and embedded video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, with guests Faith Rothberg and TATech Vice President Pete Weddle, discusses the importance and relevance of Faith’s panel discussion topic, “Fraudulent postings: Why protecting users protects your business.”


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First, Pete Weddle provides viewers who may be unfamiliar with TATech a little background on the organization. TATech, formerly the IAEWS (International Assocation of Employment Websites), has its roots in job boards. It has evolved as the industry has evolved. The association includes almost any organization providing technology and services that help facilitate the talent acquisition process. Collectively, the TATech membership powers over 60,000 sites or applications.

The TATech Industry Congress is the only industry-focused event in 2016. At this event, Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, will moderate a panel discussion on a hot topic in the job board industry. The title of Faith Rothberg’s panel discussion is “Fraudulent postings: Why protecting users protects your business.” Faith explains that the panel discussion will cover everything from how fraudulent postings can occur, how businesses can prevent them from occurring, and how business owners/recruiters can keep them to a minimum. The panel will cover criminal intent, technological solutions, and enhancing the candidate experience.

Fraudulent job postings have become more of a problem lately because scammers have figured out ways to automate attacks on job posting sites to steal personal information. This can lead to problems for candidates when searching for jobs online. This can lead to more severe impacts on candidates, including identity theft. Scammers have become highly educated in this process.

Pete Weddle adds that he regularly hears from talent acquisition professionals who are concerned about this problem; he is very excited about hosting this panel discussion at the TATech Industry Congress.

Faith believes that TATech is truly helping the job board industry to better equip themselves to handle this problem through the TRUEad program. TATech created the TRUEad program in response to this issue. It is a centralized place to report fraudulent job postings and to gain awareness about fraudulent job postings.

For more information about the TATech Industry Congress or the TRUEad program, visit the TATech website.

Have you followed College Recruiter’s blog? Follow us today to receive links to articles like this. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Posted March 23, 2016 by

Planning for college recruitment

Creating a college recruitment program from scratch is a daunting task. This 3-part video series featuring The WorkPlace Group (WPG) experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, provides talent acquisition leaders with suggestions and guidelines for starting their own college recruitment programs.

The video series is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace. Part 1 provides talent acquisition professionals tips about getting started when planning a college recruitment program.


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The first place to start when planning a college recruitment program is to identify objectives for developing a college recruitment program. This helps identify internship opportunities within the organization; this transfers into considering which degrees match up with internship needs. After this, employers must consider their resources. Resources include not only budgetary items but also time, staffing hours, and travel time.

Dr. Demetriadou advises her clients to determine “what [they] need, where [they] need it, and how much [they] are willing to invest in the process.”

Part 2 helps college recruiters with the school selection process.


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Once college recruiters have identified their objectives and resources, it’s time to do an environmental scan. One of the factors to consider is geography. Will staff need to travel to conduct campus recruiting visits and OCIs (on campus interviews)? Will students need to travel to visit the employer facility/headquarters?

Another factor to keep in mind is diversity, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. If the university is large, but the demographics do not offer a diverse candidate pool, recruiters may want to remove the university from the target list or consider re-prioritization.

It’s also important to consider whether it’s more beneficial to recruit nationally or regionally. It may be helpful to create a tiered list for college recruiting.

Consider the curriculum at the universities. Do they match with the available internships and entry-level jobs?

These are just a few of the factors to consider when doing an environmental scan when planning for college recruitment.

Part 3 wraps up the college recruitment planning process and discusses how to narrow down the school selection list.


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Although there is no such thing as having too large a list of schools during the planning phase or beginning stages of the college recruitment planning process, Dr. Steven Lindner mentions that part of the college recruitment process is narrowing down the target list for college recruiting. He reminds viewers that there is a difference between visiting schools and recruiting from them.

In the beginning, it’s great to keep college recruiting options broad to ensure meeting objectives. However, as recruiters consider their resources, they must narrow down the target list significantly in order to work within the constraints of their budgets.

Dr. Demetriadou reminds viewers to “think big, but implement small.”

Continue reading our blog for more featured articles with The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou. For more videos and tips about the timeline for developing a great college recruitment program, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted March 22, 2016 by

How to use social media to engage with employers

How can college students and recent graduates use social media to engage online with potential employers (recruiters and talent acquisition professionals) during the job search process?

In this 5-minute video, Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter, provides tips and information for students and grads about how to maximize connections with employers while searching for jobs and networking online.


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A study by Aberdeen found that 73% of 18-34 year-olds found their last job through social networking. Social media is truly valuable, not just for use in your personal life, but for professional use as well. 94% of employers admit to searching for candidates on social media before inviting them in for a face-to-face interview.

Clearly social media matters.

According to a Career Crossroads study, you’re 10 times more likely to land a job if your job application is accompanied by an employee referral.

Knowing the right people matters. But how can you obtain an employee referral if you don’t already personally know someone working within the company? By connecting with employers via social media!

First, do an advanced search on LinkedIn to identify employees within the company, particularly those who live in your preferred region, and invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn.

Next, visit the company’s website to see which social media sites the company hosts. Follow the company online, not just to check for job postings, but also to engage with recruiters and hiring managers who post LinkedIn discussions and host Twitter chats.

One way to brand yourself to potential employers on social media is to comment on social media discussions in a thoughtful, meaningful manner. Do not engage in discussions hosted by employers in a hostile, rude manner, even if you feel passionate about the topic; remember to keep online conversation polite and courteous at all times. This isn’t Reddit or your personal text thread.

Do make it a point to share your expertise in subject matter when applicable. This brands you as a subject matter expert. While it’s great to compliment people, or make bland comments like, “Love it!” or “I agree,” these comments are never memorable.

Comments that provoke further, deeper discussion are memorable. Comments with embedded links to other great content are memorable. Insightful, appropriate comments demonstrating experience and expertise are memorable.

If you never comment and simply read threads, you will not be remembered; you must participate in order to stand out from the hundreds (or thousands) of job applicants vying for positions.

To learn more about how to use social media to your advantage in your job search, follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Posted March 03, 2016 by

NACE 2016: Benchmarks in college recruiting

At the 2016 National Association of Colleges and Employers Conference & Expo June 7-10 in Chicago, College Recruiter’s President and Founder Steven Rothberg will present a session for employers entitled “How to Benchmark Your University Relations Program in the Absence of Benchmarks.”

In this brief video hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, Rothberg explains why clear benchmarks in college recruiting do not often exist and helps define some potential solutions to this problem.


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Rothberg mentions that in the field of college recruiting, until recently, very few college recruiting programs had benchmarks. As a result, many college recruiting programs did not know if they were operating effectively. Some college recruiting programs are beginning to share their operations data and establish benchmarks, but there is still a lack of continuity across the industry.

For example, not all organizations define cost per hire the same way. If a recruiter travels, and the company does not factor in all travel costs and salary costs, as well as fees charged by the university, then the cost per hire estimate is inaccurate. Failure to accurately estimate costs affects overall budget estimates.

It’s also important to use benchmarks accurately in order to measure success in college recruiting and to give credit where credit is due. Rothberg cites his work with a client recently who was able to pinpoint the exact number of candidates who’d been hired as a result of working with the college recruiting team.

Benchmarking is not just about measuring your own success, Rothberg notes, but also about comparing your achievements to those of others in the field whose organizations are similar to yours and who are hiring similar types of candidates. Cooperating with other employers by sharing benchmarking data can help you reach goals. This is what Rothberg’s session at the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo will focus on.

Don’t forget to register for the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo. Follow College Recruiter’s blog for more information about best practices in college recruiting, and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process?

Posted March 02, 2016 by

SHRM 2016: Metrics don’t lie

At the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition  April 18-20, Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, will present to recruiters, talent acquisition leaders, and human resource managers. The title of his presentation is “Metrics don’t lie, but is your staff lying about its metrics?”

In this 7-minute video hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, Rothberg provides an overview of his upcoming presentation as well as clarification on why metrics matter.


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Before talent acquisition leaders begin using metrics to measure their success in college recruiting programs, they must first define measurable objectives. Rothberg mentions that this is one of the problems in college recruiting. Rothberg states that most talent acquisition leaders, particularly in college recruiting programs, did not use metrics or data to measure their success until recently.

Generic data points, like average cost per hire, assist in measuring effectiveness. However, putting those metrics into context is even more helpful. If your organization’s cost per hire is really low, Rothberg states, then you probably have a pretty effective operation. If your organization’s cost per hire is $10,000, and other organizations similar to you are hiring at $5,000, that may be a red flag.

Rothberg is particularly excited about presenting at the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition because the event is always full of positive energy, with attendees genuinely motivated to grow and become better, regardless of their job title or position within their organizations. For this reason, Rothberg is including information in his presentation about how talent acquisition professionals can get a seat at the table by using predictive analytics. Talent acquisition professionals can use predictive analytics to discuss potential problems and to offer solutions. For example, labor market shortages  and impending increases in benefit costs might be discussed using predictive analytics, and proposals about ways to deal with those changes might be made.

Be sure to register for the 2016 SHRM Talent Management Conference and Exposition.

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