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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 21, 2013 by

29% of Employers Plan to Hire Seasonal Workers to Fill Summer Job Openings

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Seasonal hiring expectations this summer mark a continued improvement over the years immediately following the recession, according to a new survey. Nearly three in ten employers (29 percent) report they plan to hire seasonal workers this summer. While unchanged from 2012, the number is significantly up from an average of 21 percent from 2008 to 2011.

The nationwide survey—conducted for Careerbuilder online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013— included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Employers in leisure and hospitality (47 percent), manufacturing (34 percent), information technology (34 percent) and retail (33 percent) are the most likely to hire seasonal help this summer. More than half of all employers (53%) will complete their seasonal hiring in May or June.

“The summer forecast shows yet again that although the jobs recovery has been slow, employers are more confident today than they were three or four years ago,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “Seasonal work –whether in retail or engineering – is also a good entry point into the labor force for job seekers, as a vast majority of employers – 67 percent – will consider summer hires for permanent positions.” (more…)

Posted May 10, 2013 by

Cost to Employer of Bad Hire Exceeds $50,000

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

A new study shows that hiring the wrong person can have serious implications for companies. More than half of employers in each of the ten largest world economies said that a bad hire (someone who turned out not to be a good fit for the job or did not perform it well) has negatively impacted their business, pointing to a significant loss in revenue or productivity or challenges with employee morale and client relations.

For example, among those reporting having had a bad hire, 27 percent of U.S. employers reported a single bad hire cost more than $50,000. In the Eurozone, bad hires were most expensive in Germany, with 29 percent reporting costs of 50,000 euros ($65,231) or more. In the U.K., 27 percent of companies say bad hire costs more than 50,000 British pounds. Three in ten Indian employers (29 percent) reported the average bad hire cost more than 2 million Indian rupees ($37,150), and nearly half of surveyed employers in China (48 percent) reported costs exceeding 300,000 CNY ($48,734). (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

How Recent College Grads Can Negotiate Starting Salaries

Professionals shaking handsIn a recent study, nearly half of employers reported they would pay recent college graduates $30,000 to $49,999 this year, and 25 percent reported they would pay $50,000 or more. When asked what they would be willing to negotiate when extending a job offer to a recent college graduate, 27 percent of employers said they would consider increasing starting salaries and a significant number said they would also be willing to negotiate other hard benefits such as tuition reimbursement and bonuses or soft benefits such as flexible schedules and telecommuting opportunities.

The percentages of employers who said they would negotiate benefits with recent college graduates being considered for entry-level jobs were: (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

Top 10 Cities for Job Seeking College Grads

Phoenix, Arizona skylineEver heard the expression, “go where the money is?” Well, for college graduates who are searching for entry-level jobs, it definitely pays to go to the metro area with the largest number of entry-level job openings. The top 10 metros with the most year-over-year growth for entry-level jobs for college grads are: (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

10 Top Industries For Job Seeking College Grads

Upward arrow with staircase

Upward arrow with staircase graphic courtesy of Shutterstock

Which industries are seeing the most growth in entry-level jobs for college-educated workers? Industries with the largest year-over-year growth for entry-level jobs are: (more…)

Posted May 03, 2013 by

10 Hottest Majors for Job Seeking College Grads

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Matt Ferguson, CEO of Careerbuilder

Which college majors stand to fare better in today’s job market? Which industries and locations are seeing the most growth in entry-level jobs for college-educated workers? New research  shows where the jobs are and what employers are willing to negotiate in job offers for America’s next generation of workers.

“More than half of employers reported they plan to hire recent college graduates this year,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “College students who are graduating in business, technology and health-related majors will have an advantage in terms of the volume of opportunities available today. However, other majors such as liberal arts and sciences are also attractive to employers as they look for individuals with strong communications and critical-thinking skills.”

In-Demand College Majors

In a nationwide online survey of more than 2,000 employers, CareerBuilder and Harris Interactive© asked companies which college majors were most in demand at their firms. Similar to last year, business and technical majors are the most sought after: (more…)

Posted May 02, 2013 by

Top 4 Reasons Why 34% of Healthcare Workers Plan to Quit in 2013

Jason Lovelace, President of CareerBuilder Healthcare

Jason Lovelace, President of CareerBuilder Healthcare

Heavy patient loads, smaller staffs and higher stress levels may be causing health care workers to check themselves out of their facilities. More than a third (34 percent) of health care workers plan to look for a new job in 2013, up from 24 percent last year. Nearly half (45 percent) plan to look for a new job over the next two years. Eighty-two percent said that while they are not actively looking for a job today, they would be open to a new position if they came across the right opportunity.

“Not only are health care organizations dealing with a shortage of high skill workers, they are facing higher demand fueled by an aging population and more Americans having access to medical benefits,” said Jason Lovelace, president of CareerBuilder Healthcare. “Nearly half – 46 percent – of health care organizations said they have seen a negative impact on their organizations due to extended job vacancies.* Long hours and juggling multiple patient needs are taking their toll on morale and retention. The survey shows health care workers are seeking a more manageable work experience.” (more…)

Posted April 26, 2013 by

Men Earn Average of $68,300 Versus $44,400 For Women Because Highest-Paying Jobs Dominated by Men

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

For years there’s been a lot of controversy about why men tend to make far more money than women. I’ve seen a number of studies showing that the average woman makes about 75 percent of what the average man makes. Some believe that the problem — if it even is a problem — is due to women tending to choose occupational fields which pay less than the occupational fields which tend to be chosen by men. One counter argument to that is that many occupations require similar educational backgrounds, supply and demand for the labor, skill requirements, riskiness, and other such attributes and yet the occupations dominated by women are still paid less. An example I’ve often heard to illustrate this point is that skilled production line workers tend to make more than school teachers.

Whether one agrees that similar jobs should pay similarly or whether the market will somehow sort out who should be paid more, the data is clear that men tend to earn far more than women. A new study from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) underscores the continued wage gap in the U.S. On average, men earn $68,300 annually compared to $44,400 for women, and there continues to be a lower percentage of women in the nation’s highest-paying occupations. The study also shows that while women continue to lag men in leadership roles, trends are pointing in a positive direction with women being more equally represented or surpassing men in various high-skill, specialized positions. (more…)

Posted April 19, 2013 by

Most Employers Don’t Care What School Recent Grads Attended

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

The college graduating class of 2013 will enter a stronger job market than in the years immediately following the recession; however, young professionals entering high-skill fields may have a decided advantage, according to a new study. More than half (53 percent) of U.S. employers plan to hire recent college graduates in 2013, on par with 2012 (54 percent) and up significantly from 46 percent in 2011 and 44 percent in 2010.

The nationwide survey—conducted online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013— included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Employers in industries that generally demand more high-skill workers are also more likely to recruit recent college graduates. According to the survey, information technology employers rank ahead of all industries with 65 percent of hiring managers and human resources professionals planning to hire recent graduates. They are followed by financial services employers (63 percent) and health care employers (56 percent). Additionally, the survey found that employers in IT and financial services are the most likely to recruit workers for hard-to-fill jobs (37 percent, each) prior to graduation. (more…)