ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 25, 2014 by

Writing Your Resume for an Entry Level Job? Create an Effective Summary So It Gets Noticed

When writing your resume for an entry level job, include a summary that will give it the attention it deserves.  Learn how in the following post.

If you’re a career-minded person, you’re probably always looking for ways to improve your resume (and if you’re not, you should be). A summary section may be exactly what you need. The summary section is a great opportunity to quickly establish yourself as a stand-out candidate by taking the best parts of your resume and cover

See the original article here:

Continue Reading

Posted March 18, 2014 by

Writing Resumes in Search of Jobs for Recent College Graduates? Don’t Follow These 5 Rules

It looks like some of the rules for writing resumes have changed.  So, when creating yours in search of jobs for recent college graduates, the following post has five rules you should not follow.

Many of the “rules” have changed. Technological advances and the economic downturn have combined in recent years to create a significant effect on what works, and doesn’t work, as you job search. Resumes are no exception…

View original –

Continue Reading

Posted March 13, 2014 by

Are You a College Recruiter Who Finds Honor in Your Work?

Whether you’re a college recruiter who is looking for prospective students for your school or job candidates for your company, ask yourself if you believe what you do is honorable.  Learn more in the following post.

He asked me what I did for a living and I told him that I was one of the owners of College Recruiter. He didn’t pretend that he knew all about it so that was cool. He did ask how many people used it and I told him about our traffic…

Read this article:

Continue Reading

Posted August 12, 2013 by

Stepping Out From the Resume Middle Ages

Businessman presenting a resume

Businessman presenting a resume. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

The competition is fierce. About 1,700,000 students will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in 2013, projects the National Center for Education Statistics, which is of course good news for companies looking to hire fresh faces with new ideas. Typically, businesses look for qualities like teamwork, verbal and written communication, problem solving and organizational skills. But what is the employer really looking for when the average resume generically boasts just about every single one of these qualities? (more…)

Posted November 26, 2012 by

Lessons Learned by Employers Impacted by Hurricane Sandy

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

By Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Four weeks after Sandy, life is getting back to normal – or is it? Walking the dog around a relatively unscathed block of homes in central NJ (miles from the shore), reminders are everywhere. Tons of debris in front of every home (more than 40 homes); the noise of still more 75-foot oak trees being cut while leaning precariously over homes rends the air; blue tarps draped over roofs (5 homes) that were speared with limbs weighing tons; and a flatbed truck finally easing up behind a flattened neighbor’s car (where my 75 foot oak fell). I check to make sure he doesn’t accidentally take the new car next to it.

Sandy was a storm that has little comparison even to Katrina although we can take some comfort that lessons learned from that catastrophic event seven years ago were likely responsible for preparations last month that saved lives – response speed and pre-positioning among them. (more…)

Posted January 27, 2011 by

83% of Candidates Incorrectly Self-Identify Their Referral Source

There’s been a significant increase in the number of employer clients would prefer to pay for postings and other recruitment advertising on a for performance basis so that they only pay if they hire someone from the ad. I’d love to get there as well as it would ensure that the interests of the candidate, employer, and CollegeRecruiter.com would be well aligned but we can’t get there until the employers make the proper investments in their applicant tracking systems.

Don Firth of JobsInLogistics, AllRetailJobs, and TopUSAJobsOf the hundreds of clients we have, we’d be hard pressed to count on one hand how many of them are properly tracking the source of their hires. It is really pathetic, actually. We have one client who spend $200,000 on an applicant tracking system but didn’t spend $20,000 to add the module that would give them fully automated tracking with unique URLs. So instead they have those horrid drop-down boxes. Don Firth at AllRetailJobs.com and JobsInLogistics.com published a study showing that 83 percent of candidates misidentified their source when they clicked directly from the job board to the employer site and the job board was actually listed.

I can only imagine how much higher the percentage would be if the study included candidates who saw the posting on sites to which it was crossposted. For example, if an employer posts a job to our site then we crosspost it to thousands of other sites in our network. It is part of our selling proposition so there’s full transparency with our clients. If a candidate sees the posting on one of our partner sites and then applies on the employer site, will the candidate know to identify CollegeRecruiter.com? No way.

The only solution is fully automated tracking where the employer provides a unique URL to every board and other source to which they post the opportunity. Then regardless of where the candidate sees the posting the source will be properly tracked. Of course, that assumes that the ATS is setup to properly track those URLs and that the HR people using the ATS are properly trained on how to make that work.

We’re talking with a client right now about a pay-per-hire deal. We are confident that the client is properly tracking. We’d welcome more such deals as they’re great for all concerned, but I suspect that we’ll get a lot of interest from employers whose systems don’t measure up to their desires.

Originally posted by Steven Rothberg