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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

Linkedin website on a computer screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Ingvar Bjork/Shutterstock.com

Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted May 19, 2015 by

Why You Should Go Back To School–At Any Age

Portrait of a college student in adult education class

Portrait of a college student in adult education class. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Many individuals believe that they should stop studying when they have found a career field that they enjoy and have secured a good job. However, an undergraduate degree may not be enough to take someone to the highest levels in their field, and many people find that their best option is to continue on with their education. There are a number of reasons why successful people decide to go back to school at any age. (more…)

Posted March 06, 2015 by

College Leave: How to Turn an Absence into an Asset

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

You’ve just spent eight or 10 hours at your job, and now you’re planning on spending your evening studying or going to class. Coping with the pressure can be hard, but returning to college after spending time in the workforce doesn’t have to be a stressful experience. Follow these tips to help you pave the way to furthering your education and getting the job you’ve always dreamed of. (more…)

Posted June 10, 2014 by

Have New Jobs, College Graduates? 5 Ways to Gain Credibility in the Workplace

From the way you walk to the way you talk, people are constantly judged for one reason or another, and that includes the workplace.  So, for those with jobs for college graduates who want to gain credibility in the office, learn five ways to do so in the following post.

In corporate America, perception is reality. Others form impressions of us in seconds: the clothes we wear, our body language and the words we use. Do you want to be seen as a credible, knowledgeable expert in your field? How do you make sure your brand sets you up for real success? Here are five ways to ensure the

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Posted August 23, 2013 by

Returning to the Workforce? What to Know if You’re Searching for an Entry Level Job

Whether you are returning to the workforce after having children or otherwise, you may discover some changes.  If you’re searching for an entry level job, the following post has some information you should know.

Our Career Consultant Jean Ottley describes the adjustments needed when planning to return to the workforce. Back to the future – paid work after children I’ve been talking to parents who are getting ready to go back into the…

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Posted June 19, 2013 by

Use Youth as an Advantage on Your Entry Level Job as an Entrepreneur

While youth can be perceived to be a disadvantage when working on an entry level job, if you’re an entrepreneur it can serve you well.  The following post shares more information.

Being a young entrepreneur in business today is exciting. Youth is your biggest asset; you should rock it to your advantage. But how do you overcome the preconceived notions that come with being a younger contender—like assumptions that you’re inexperienced, naive and in for a rude awakening by the industry? The answer is simple: you turn

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How Your Youth Can Be Your Biggest Business Asset of All

Posted November 27, 2012 by

How To Fight Age Discrimination

CollegeRecruiter.comWhile the job market has been tight for many people, it seems that older workers have a harder time finding new jobs.  One problem could be age discrimination.  So, what can these workers do to increase their chances of getting hired?  Learn more in the following post.

Being out of work is hard, being unemployed and in your 50’s can be impossible. While companies won’t admit it, age discrimination does exist, particularly in a tight job market where there are many more candidates than job openings. Although the problem crosses both genders, older women reentering the job market can have an even tougher time.  According to the September jobs report, women 55 and older who have been out of work for longer than 27 weeks increased from 50.9% in August to 54% in September.

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How To Fight Age Discrimination

Posted August 15, 2012 by

40% of Workers Live Paycheck to Paycheck, Down From 46% in 2008

Pay slip / paycheckFewer American workers are reliant on their next payday to make ends meet, according to a new survey. Forty percent of workers report that they always or usually live paycheck to paycheck, a slight decrease from 42 percent in 2011. This year’s figure marks a recession-era low, continuing a downward trend from a peak of 46 percent in 2008, during the early days of the financial crisis.

The nationwide survey – conducted between May 14 and June 4, 2012 among more than 3,800 full-time workers – found that a majority of those currently living paycheck to paycheck (53 percent) were not doing so until 2008. Additionally, 37 percent of workers say they sometimes live paycheck to paycheck, while 23 percent say they never do. Twenty percent of workers were unable to make ends meet at least once in the last year.

Workers making at least six figures are feeling more confident in 2012. Twelve percent of workers who earn $100,000 or more always or usually live paycheck to paycheck – trending down from 14 percent in 2011 and 17 percent in 2010. (more…)

Posted March 01, 2012 by

36% Discuss Politics at Work. Remainder Don’t Get Three Branches of Government.

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer pointing her finger at President Barack ObamaAs one of the most anticipated and contentious presidential races moves forward, you may find the most vocal political pundits in the next cubicle, according to a new CareerBuilder survey. Thirty-six percent of workers reported they discuss politics at work. Forty-three percent expect they will be talking about this year’s presidential election with co-workers. The nationwide survey of more than 7,000 full-time workers nationwide was conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder between November 9 and December 5, 2011.

While most conversations around politics were good-natured or even-tempered, 23 percent of workers who have discussed politics at work reported they had a heated discussion or fight with a co-worker, boss or someone else higher up in the organization. One-in-ten workers said their opinion about a co-worker changed after they discovered that person’s political affiliation, with most stating it changed for the negative. (more…)