ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 13, 2020 by

How employers should communicate their social justice and progressive values to job seekers

The conventional wisdom is that the older you get, the more conservative you get. But better analysis shows that how progressive or conservative your generation is has more to do with when they came of age than your current age. Generations that came of age when conservativism was fashionable, such as during the Reagan Administration, tend to stay conservative as they age. And generations that came of age when progressiveness was fashionable, such as during the Obama Administration, tend to stay progressive as they age.

Today’s youngest job seekers — members of Gen Z — came of age during Obama’s presidency, and tend to be more progressive than previous generations. They have a greater interest in working with companies that place a high value on gender pay equity, salary transparency, diversity, equity, and inclusion. How should employers communicate these values to job candidates in an authentic way?

Authenticity by employers is important to all candidates, not just the youngest members of the workforce. But the youngest members also tend to be amongst the savviest in finding accurate information, so employers may be able to more easily fool older than younger candidates, but all deserve accurate information.

At College Recruiter, we remind employers of the expression that a picture is worth 1,000 words but then build on that to tell them that if a picture is worth 1,000 words, then a video is worth 1,000 pictures. Use video to communicate your corporate values and do so using short stories by actual employees. 

Do you encourage the creation and active participation in employee resource groups such as those for members of LGBTQ communities? If so, record a very short video and then share that on your YouTube channel and elsewhere. 

Have you undergone an audit to ensure that your compensation is equitable across gender and other lines? If so, record a very short video and then share that too.

Today’s grads, as compared to past generations, are more inclined to care about concepts like diversity, inclusion, equal pay for women, instead of just what their own salary and benefits will be. College Recruiter has been helping students and recent graduates find part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs since 1994 and so we’ve seen a lot of changes. One of those changes is the heightened desire by those mostly younger candidates to do work that benefits society rather than just their bank accounts. The reasons are numerous, but their education and the economy are two of the most important. Regarding education, today’s young people are taught more about diversity, climate change, and other societal issues when they’re in primary and secondary schools and so they know and care more about these issues than previous generations. Regarding the economy, it is pretty easy for them to find a job and so they’re better able to be choosy. If you graduate into a recession, you’re going to feel fortunate to be able to get any job and so you take it even if the employer’s values don’t align well with yours. But if you have the choice of five jobs, you’re able to weigh factors like salary against social good and many will take less salary in return for doing work that benefits society as a whole.

More companies are being transparent around salary and hiring decisions to address these issues and young workers are reacting as you would expect: they’re more inclined to seek and accept employment from employers who are more transparent about their compensation and hiring practices. Fortunately, more companies are being more transparent around salary and hiring decisions and we’re advocates for that, but “more” does not mean most. A quick look at the job posting ads on just about any job search site will reveal that the vast majority of job ads do not disclose the salary, which we feel is counterproductive both to the candidate and the employer. Job search sites see a higher quantity and quality of applications to jobs that disclose salary ranges. The only justification for an employer not disclosing salary is their desire to underpay a candidate. If the employer wants to pay fairly for a role, then they should know before advertising it what a fair range would be and they should publish that as part of the job listing ad. If a candidate meets the basic criteria but not all, then the hiring manager should be able to explain that to the candidate when offering them a salary toward the bottom of the range and the hiring manager should be able to explain what the candidate needs to do in order to be paid more, such as accumulating X years of experience with a particular piece of technology. 

It is one thing for an employer to value diversity, equity, and inclusion. It is another thing for their recruiters and hiring managers to discuss such topics during the hiring process. Many employers have made great strides in diversifying their applicant pool, yet still overwhelmingly hire candidates who are not diverse. Why? Because many of the hiring managers are still reluctant to hire people whose backgrounds, thought process, etc. differ from their own. But study after study demonstrate that the more diverse a workforce, the more productive that workforce is and so hiring manager who consciously or unconsciously resist diversity are undermining the efforts of their organizations to improve the productive of their workforce and no employer should employ a manager who does that. Hiring managers need to be educated about the productivity benefits of diversity and embrace those. If they’re unwilling or unable to do so, then their employers should bring in hiring managers who are able and willing to recruit and retain workforces which are as productive as possible. 

As the United States workforce becomes increasingly diverse, it is becoming increasingly important for employers to expand their talent pools so that they have access to more diverse candidates. Employers who look at their top performers and then want to hire more people with similar attributes are condemning themselves to a non-diverse workforce as everyone in that workforce starts to look more and more alike. If all of your top salespeople come from the same fraternity, it is tempting to only hire people from that fraternity. That begs the question, however, as to whether top salespeople — perhaps even better than the ones you have now — might be found elsewhere. Could they be women? Could they be people who aren’t members of fraternities or sororities? Might they attend schools from which you’ve never hired people? From majors different from those you’ve targeted? Just because candidates with certain backgrounds have worked well for you in the past does not mean that those are the only backgrounds that will work well for you in the future, or even will be the backgrounds that will work the best for you in the future.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How the CIA uses productivity data to win support for its D&I programs

Most of Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire dozens or even hundreds have diversity and inclusion programs because their talent acquisition and other human resource leaders know that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce.

But many and perhaps most of these TA and HR leaders struggle to get the resources they need for their D&I programs. Why? Because these TA and HR leaders have not been able to win support for these programs from their CEO, CFO, and other C-suite executives.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our closing keynote presenter was Roynda Hartsfield, former Chief of Hiring for the CIA’s Directorate of Digital Innovations (DDI) and current Head of Talent Acquisition for Excel Technologies, LLC. Roy wowed the 125 people in the room plus the hundreds watching the livestream as she walked through how she and other members of her team at the CIA first used data to demonstrate to its C-suite how their most diverse and inclusive teams were also their most productive teams and then won the resources to make the CIA’s diversity and inclusion efforts even stronger.

After her presentation, Roy was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Gerry Crispin, Principal and Co-Founder for CareerXroads and Co-Founder of TalentBoard.org, which works to improve the candidate experience by defining, measuring, and improving the treatment of job candidates;
  • Ankit Somani, Co-Founder for AllyO;
  • Marjorie McCamey, Corporate Development for intrnz and Corporate Recruiter for Franklin Templeton.

Are you struggling to win the resources you need from your C-suite? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How to recruit employees with Asperger’s Syndrome

Conferences can be tremendous opportunities to learn, but too many conferences cover the same topics over and over and over again and sometimes it is even the same presentation by the same speaker. But not always. Sometimes, the topic is new to the attendees, or presented in a markedly different manner.  

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our featured presenter was Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants. Jo shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how and why leading employers are reaching out to candidates with Asperger’s Syndrome not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes business sense to do it.

After her presentation, Jo was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Keca Ward, Senior Director of Talent Acquisition for Phenom People;
  • Jon Kestenbaum, Executive Director of Talent Tech Labs;
  • Janine Truitt, Member of College Recruiter’s content expert board and Chief Innovations Officer for Talent Think Innovations; and
  • Lois Barth, Principal and Human Development Expert for Lois Barth Coaching & Consulting Services.

Are you debating whether to recruit people with Asperger’s or struggling to retain them? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates, including those with Asperger’s? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How EY built a better workforce through diversity and inclusion

One of the nice things about attending conferences is the opportunity to learn from experts.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our opening keynote speaker was Ken Bouyer, Americas Director for Inclusiveness Recruiting for Ernst & Young. Ken shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how EY built a better workforce through gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, and generational diversity and inclusion.

After his presentation, Ken was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Dawn Carter, Director, Global University Recruiting for Uber;
  • Kimberly Jones, former talent acquisition leader for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, GE Aviation, Raytheon, Honda, and Nationwide and currently CEO of Kelton Legend;
  • Pam Baker, Member of College Recruiter’s Content Expert Board and Founder and CEO for Journeous; and
  • Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants.

Are you struggling to improve your diversity and inclusion efforts? Who isn’t? Watch the one-hour video of the presentation and panel discussion:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted October 07, 2019 by

How should employers recruit Gen Z candidates?

At College Recruiter, we define Generation Z as those born after 1996. The oldest of these, therefore, emerging from colleges and universities or are already well into the workforce if they didn’t obtain any post-secondary education.

This generation is different from the millennial generation. Very different. So catch yourself before you start making assumptions about them. Gen Z is a transformative generation. It is unique and not like anything you’ve seen before. Some quick facts:

One of the most defining characteristics of Gen Z is its diversity. 

  • They are the first non-White majority generation. 
  • Gen Z is the first digital native generation. They are the biggest consumers of media, and have consumed media since a very young age, including streaming movies, shopping, social media, etc. They do not remember a time when information wasn’t a click away. The interesting thing is, 79% believe they spend too much time online, according to J. Walter Thompson Intelligence. They understand computers, and their users, as being connected to all other computers in the world.
  • While they often shop online, they actually prefer to buy from small, local family-owned shops in person. As consumers, they are somewhat turned off by huge corporations.
  • Throughout their lives, Gen Z has been exposed to economic strife, including the Great Recession. The U.S. has been at war their entire lives, and school shootings have become the norm. As such, they seek security and stability.
Posted June 12, 2019 by

If Your C-Suite Is Not Supporting Your Diversity Efforts, Ask Them How Many Left-Handed Employees They Have

Numerous studies show that the more diverse an organization’s workforce is, the more productive they are. In fact, research from McKinsey found that companies that are diverse by gender and ethnicity, outperform their peers financially by 35%!

And yet, it can still be a challenge for some talent acquisition teams to get buy-in for their diversity efforts from CEOs and other leaders. Without this support from the top, it’s virtually impossible to create a diversified workforce.

“Organizations must see diversity as an essential element of their strategy, rather than a trend or an accessory,” notes Kimberly Jones, Global Talent Acquisition Specialist and Founder of Kelton Legend, a multi-dimensional talent acquisition strategy organization. “If your leadership team doesn’t see the value of diversity, you can make a strong business case — there is plenty of research that supports the fact that diverse businesses are more competitive.”

Jones suggests an interesting twist to the diversity conversation: Start by asking talent acquisition leaders how many left-handed employees they have. Think about it: If you’re a consumer goods company, designing instruments such as scissors, and you don’t have left-handed engineers or designers, how can you produce a product that is effective for everyone? You’re probably not producing products that are as functional as they could be. And, since approximately 30% of the population is left handed, you’re only marketing to 70% of the people. Why would you intentionally lose out on market share?

This principle applies to gender, ethnicity, age and people who are differently-abled. Without a diverse team, you’re missing out on the valuable perspectives and distinctive contributions that come from a blend of people.

Jones adds: “Forget the assumption that there is a ‘norm’ — we are all different. And we should all have an opportunity to contribute our unique talents.”

Using Diversity to Attract Diversity

The other hurdle that companies must get over is creating a diverse talent acquisition team. Having diversity on your talent acquisition team accomplishes two things:

  • It shows that your company values diversity and provides an accurate representation of your workforce (if you have a diverse workforce).
  • It helps a wide variety of potential candidates relate better to your team and your company.

Jones recommends thinking beyond just gender or ethnicity and include different personalities, such as introverts and extroverts. Most companies think that recruiters should be naturally extroverted but imagine a highly-qualified candidate who is an introvert and feels uncomfortable trying to communicate with these outgoing, gregarious people, especially in a crowded career fair or other recruiting event. Some positions, such as engineers or accountants may not require an extroverted person. Companies that fail to relate to all candidates may miss out on some extraordinary talent.

The bottom line: Organizations that fail to embrace diversity may be less productive and less financially successful. They risk losing opportunities due to bias, even if those biases are unconscious.

“Unfortunately, you can’t teach someone to be unbiased,” said Jones. “It’s a result of a lifetime of teaching and experiences. However, you can make people more aware of their biases and teach empathy. That should be our goal.”

To hear more from Kimberly Jones, check out our video interview:

Or visit www.keltonlegend.com to learn more about Kimberly and her talent acquisition strategies.

Posted February 09, 2019 by

Selecting and Qualifying the Right Job Board Partners

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” – Napolean Hill

Mission Possible

Many companies craft mission statements that help guide the way they do business and create a certain company culture. Unfortunately, surveys show that these statements have very little influence on how many companies actually do business.

According to Wikipedia, a mission statement is intended to “guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path and the framework or context within which the company’s strategies are formulated.” That sounds noble – and even essential – for a successful company, and yet, in the daily hustle to meet customer needs, hit business targets and respond to competitive threats, these “guiding principles” are often the first things to slip. So, we understand why many people are skeptical about their value.

However, research also shows that the most successful companies are those that have teams focused around a common purpose and have deeply socialized guiding principles. They accomplish this by putting them into practice every day instead of letting them gather dust in a binder or simply serve as wall decorations.

What’s more, the most outstanding companies have “outward facing” principles, which means they have guidelines not just for creating a positive corporate culture, but also for how they interact with their customers. When deciding on a supplier or vendor, for any aspect of your business, including job boards and other recruitment vendors, it’s important to understand what motivates them and guides their actions.

Partnerships vs. Suppliers

For the most part, the “supplier-customer” relationship is straightforward. The supplier provides the product or service that the customer needs. And, the customer chooses a supplier based on price, features, quality, service levels, etc. But what if we take this relationship to the next level?

For instance, instead of viewing a recruitment services vendor as simply a supplier of candidates, begin to think of them as your partner – someone who is striving to help your business succeed by providing the right candidates for the right positions. In order to do this effectively, the vendor needs to know more than just the job description. They must understand the company/industry, the culture, the challenges, the “real” requirements, and more. This necessitates a partnership.

The difference between a supplier and a true partner is that partnerships are built through:

  • Transparency, candor, and empathy – There is trust, which is built on open, honest communications and a desire to understand your business and its needs.
  • Collaboration – Which requires active listening in order to discover how to bring more value to the relationship and tailor services to meet client needs.
  • Accountability – Partners want to exceed expectations, provide measurable results and offer performance guarantees.

Creating Value for our Partners

Let’s face it, one-way relationships are not very fulfilling. At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And, we believe that a strong partnership with our customers must be two-way – with each party holding the other accountable for upholding their side of the “bargain” We understand that establishing mutually beneficial relationships with our partners – whether they are employers, advertising agencies, recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) organizations or universities – is critical to our success and yours.

“We think you’ll find working with College Recruiter to be like a breath of fresh air,” said Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer. “We believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience, and we’re passionate about the customer experience. We want to be more than just a ‘supplier’ – we sincerely want to form a lasting partnership with those we work with.”

At College Recruiter, we value:

  • Honesty and integrity
  • Enthusiasm, tenacity, and fun
  • Unparalleled customer experiences
  • Critical thinking and problem solving
  • Teamwork and collaboration
  • Continuous improvements

Doesn’t that sound like a company you’d like to partner with? Of course, actions speak louder than words. That’s why we stand behind our job postings, targeted emails, mobile banners, and display banner ads, and guarantee results for clients. From our management team and advisory board to our content panel and our employees, we select people who share our values. And, whether its targeted emails or job postings, branding campaigns or diversity solutions, College Recruiter delivers for our partners.

In fact, we have a long list of client partners that love us! Listen to what they have to say:

“We run job posting ads on a lot of sites but had never used College Recruiter until we purchased an unlimited job posting package a month ago. We were amazed at the high quantity and quality of responses that we received. After only two days, we had a positive return on our investment for the entire month.” –Leapforce, Inc.

“The support that you provide is outstanding. Thanks!” — Recruitment Center, Central Intelligence Agency

“We’ve tried several ways to recruit college students for our entry-level positions including job postings on other leading college job boards. None worked well so we were skeptical when first approached by College Recruiter… (Your) approach in having the job posted to our area rather than to a handful of schools proved to generate far more responses than the postings on the other sites…it really works!!!!” — Sequoia Financial

“College Recruiter has been working as a great resource for our Talent Acquisition team! Our inbox has been flooded with applications from quality candidates, a bit overwhelming but we will take it!” — University Relations and Recruiting Coordinator, HGST, a Western Digital Company

“I was completely blown away by College Recruiter’s data and analytics.” — Kara Yarnot, member of College Recruiter’s board of advisors and former head of talent acquisition for SAIC and college relations for Boeing

Making a Match

At the risk of sounding cliché, finding the right job board partner can be a bit like dating. You have basic requirements, but since a great recruiter needs to know your company or agency quite intimately, there are other aspects to consider when forming a partnership, such as:

  • Is there chemistry?
  • Do their values align with yours?
  • Are they well-managed and ethical?
  • Do they listen more than they talk? (No one likes a date who talks about himself/herself all night!)
  • Are they responsive?
  • Do they offer any type of guarantees?
  • Are they willing to offer references or direct contact with other customers?

Whether you work with College Recruiter or another job board, be sure to find the right fit for you. This will not only lead to a higher quantity and quality of applicants but also savings in both time and money over the long-term.

If you’d like to connect and talk about partnerships opportunities, visit http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/home or call 952-848-2211.

 

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

Posted January 15, 2019 by

We need to stop blaming hourly, service industry workers for being poor when we pay them crap and treat them worse

More than 10,000 talent acquisition and other human resource professionals are avid readers of Hung Lee‘s excellent, weekly, e-newsletter, Recruiting Brainfood. If you’re in TA, HR, or an affiliated industry like I am, then you need to subscribe if you care about staying current with new technology, trends, and ways of looking at the world of recruitment.

Hung recently shared an article published by Huffington Post by Lauren Hough. The article, “I Was A Cable Guy. I Saw The Worst Of America”, was a fascinating, first-person view into the life of a lesbian (her sexual identification was quite relevant to the article) cable installer for a telecommunications company.  She made — and admitted to making — some mistakes and some ethical lapses, but for those of us whose jobs require far more muscle between our ears than on our arms, legs, and backs, it provided an incredibly powerful reminder of how hard service industry people work, how poorly they’re paid, and how awfully they’re treated. I shared the article to the new, Recruiting Brainfood group on Facebook, and that sparked an interesting discussion. (more…)

Posted November 05, 2018 by

From internship to full-fledged career: how one Fortune 500 company is recruiting from within

 

Author: Kate-Madonna Hindes

Investing in entry-level workers creates greater job stability and more opportunities for advancement for employees, contributing to a more economically vibrant society.(Rockefeller Foundation)

Every single day, new relationships are forming, and interns are turning into full-time employees. Across thousands of different companies, H.R. and recruiting departments are making long-term investments for maximum growth and profitability. Smart companies are taking note while searching for interns to see if they have the qualities they are looking for in full-time employees.

(more…)

Posted August 24, 2018 by

Age discrimination: Over 40 and interviewing

 

Let’s talk about the issues that 40+ year olds are facing in the job market today. Almost 20% of all college and university students — about four million — are over the age of 35. So why do we automatically think of a bunch of 20 something’s when we hear “recent graduates”? This is also often the image that comes to mind for talent acquisition teams and is used to discriminate against older candidates. Jo Weech, Founder and Principal Consultant at Exemplary Consultants, explains the major problems that this misconception creates.

Exemplary Consultants provides business management consulting to small businesses and start-ups. Weech got involved in the process because she truly believes that work can be better for every person on the planet. She published an article back in July that got a ton of traffic, likes, and comments. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, had a conversation with her about some of her experiences, where the article came from, and some of the lessons that came from it. The lessons learned are not only useful for job seekers, but for those in talent acquisition as well. (more…)