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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted October 11, 2016 by

Interviewing student veterans

 

Are you interviewing a student veteran for a job at your company? Congrats! Veterans bring a set of skills that can stand above the other students you are interviewing.

If you are like many hiring managers, you have limited experience interviewing vets, and are not extremely familiar with what military experience looks like. It’s important to make sure you don’t ask anything inappropriate. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your interview while remaining sensitive and legal.

What NOT to ask

  • Unless you are hiring for a Federal agency or work with Veteran Preference Points, don’t ask about their discharge status.
  • You cannot ask if they will be deployed in the future, even if their resume says they are in the Reserves.
  • Do not ask about potential disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act states that an employer may only ask disability-related questions after the applicant has been offered a job.
  • “Do you have PTSD?” (First, check your biases about vets and PTSD, and second, any question that relates to their mental health is legally off limits.)
  • “Did you get hurt in combat?” or “Do you expect your injury to heal normally?”
  • “Have you ever participated in a drug or alcohol rehabilitation program?”

Instead, you can ask…

  • Behavior-based questions that help you truly understand their previous experience
  • Questions about their goals (be smart and avoid the cliche “Where do you see yourself in the future?”)
  • “How did you deal with pressure or stress?”
  • According to the Office of Disability Employment Policy, you may ask, “Have you ever been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol?” The answer to this question should direclty relate to their ability to perform the job.

Veterans Day is November 11. Reach out to student veteran groups as part of your college recruitment this fall, and you may be impressed with what you find.

Posted October 06, 2016 by

Preparing for a career in the STEM Industries

Guest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

1272644The workforce in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, or STEM, is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Today’s STEM graduates have more career opportunities available now than at any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, the world’s leading chemical company, will examine ways that college students and new graduates can establish a strong foundation that equips them to join the next generation of scientists and engineers.

STEM disciplines have increasingly experienced talent shortages over the years. Recent data show that for every 1.9 available STEM jobs, there is only one qualified STEM professional available for hire. The resulting impact on the global economy is striking, given how many industries are part of the STEM supply chain. In fact, according to a recent report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), by 2018, there could be 2.4 million unfilled STEM jobs.

If you are considering a career in any of the STEM disciplines, do you know which education path will best prepare you? There are many programs at four-year universities, two-year colleges, community colleges, junior colleges and vocational-technical colleges. With so many choices, it might be overwhelming to determine what’s right for you, but the good news is that you can establish a strong foundation for success through many different ways.

Build a strong foundation

While we always appreciate an advanced degree, at BASF we also seek candidates who have non-traditional backgrounds that offer a transferable, yet distinct, set of skills and abilities, such as active or former military personnel. We believe hiring diverse employees results in an engaged, high-performing workforce that drives long-term success. If you are pursuing a technical career, junior colleges and certificate programs can provide you with the trade skills many companies require.

Expand your network

There are many collaborative educational partnerships that exist between businesses and schools today. See if your school offers education tracks or career fairs to set you up with connections following graduation. Most STEM related companies interview and hire students before they graduate, working closely with colleges to get a jump on the competition.

Some companies, including BASF, recruit high-potential candidates through internship programs. Internships are a great way to build first-hand experience, gain practical insights into a particular company and larger industry, and help you apply the skills you learned in school. While possessing strong science and math skills might seem obvious, young professionals in the STEM fields also need well-developed interpersonal skills, as well as presentation, public speaking, organizational skills and great attention to detail.

After college, what’s next? For advice on the myriad career opportunities in STEM available to new graduates today, check back next Thursday to read “Exploring STEM Career Opportunities for Young Professionals.”

luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

Posted October 04, 2016 by

Student veterans: Do you think you know them?

 

Most organizations say they are interested in recruiting student veterans, and many large companies have whole teams dedicated to veteran recruitment. Yet we often see a disconnect between these teams and the college recruitment teams.  Some college relations teams don’t know what to do with student veterans so they refer them to the military recruitment team. The military recruitment team often doesn’t know what to do with students and so they refer them over to the college relations team. (more…)

Posted September 30, 2016 by

5 simple strategies for recent college grads struggling to save for retirement

save money words on a chalkboard illustrating back to school savings or instructions on how to save on your education costs

Save money now, reap the rewards later. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

We get it. You just graduated from college, and landed that first job. It’s an exciting time.

It’s also expensive.

You have your own apartment now, but rent is a lot higher when not living in that college town, or with fewer roommates to split the costs. Then there is that car payment and car insurance. And you are now paying for health insurance on your own for the first time. Wow, that is expensive, right? Suddenly, that salary you didn’t negotiate suddenly looks a lot smaller after taxes and deductions are taken out.

And let’s not forget those dreaded student loans you are starting to pay back. Those are a real drain, literally and figuratively. Did you borrow money from mom and dad? It might be time to pay them back too. It’s tough. And now that you finally have a job and are making some money, you want to have some fun and spend a little extra, go on a vacation, or splurge on yourself.

Save for retirement? Not now. There’s plenty of time, right? Yes, there is. But trust us, it’s never too soon for recent college grads and Millennials to focus on retirement. That may be the last thing an early-to-mid 20-something is thinking about, especially with so many other expenses.

But…follow the wise advice of professionals.

“With student loan debt and health care costs, many recent college graduates may think they need to defer or limit the amount they save for retirement until they have more money to put towards their retirement savings,” says Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

ADP’s annual study on retirement savings trends shows that employees age 20-24 defer an average of 4.6 percent of their pay into a tax qualified retirement plan, while employees age 55 and older defer an average of 8.5 percent. Yet, the cost of waiting does not add up. Recent graduates should instead start saving as early as possible – even if it is just a small portion of income.

“Being proactive today can reap big rewards tomorrow,” says DeSilva.

Below are four steps recent college graduates can take today to set themselves up for the retirement they want tomorrow:

1. Don’t wait to save until all your college loans are paid off: Save now to take advantage of compound earnings. If you wait even 10 years to start contributing to a retirement plan, you could miss out on many thousands of dollars in retirement savings.

2. Actively plan your retirement: Even if a retirement plan is offered by your employer, only you can take charge of your future financial security. Ask your Human Resources department for help in deciphering your benefit options.

3. Maximize your savings early in your career: Choose to have your employer automatically increase your retirement plan contribution every year.

4. Establish good money management habits: Focus on saving, smart budgeting and planning for emergencies. In other words, live only within your means.

While a recent college graduate isn’t likely to accept or move on from a job based on the retirement plan of the employee, it’s best to find an employer who at least offers a company match. That can help motivate recent college grads to start saving because it’s an easy way to start building your retirement base.

“While they may have many decades before retirement, Millennials can benefit from employers who guide them in making smart retirement savings choices now, at the beginning of their careers,” says DeSilva.

It’s never too early to start saving for retirement, even for recent college grads, entry-level employees and Millennials at all stages of their professional career.

Want to learn more about how to save money for retirement while managing the start of your professional career? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

About Joe DeSilva
Joe DeSilva is Senior Vice President and General Manager of ADP’s Retirement Services business unit, which serves a national client base of small, medium and Fortune 500 businesses. He is responsible for setting the strategy and overseeing the day-to-day operations of the business, which includes Sales, Marketing, Product, Development, Service and Operations functions.

The views expressed herein are those of the author, are intended for general information only and are not intended to provide investment, financial, tax or legal advice or a recommendation for any particular situation or plan.  ADP, LLC and its affiliates (ADP) do not endorse or recommend specific investment companies or products, financial advisors or service providers; engage or compensate any financial advisors to provide advice to plans or participants; offer financial, investment, tax or legal advice or management services; or serve in a fiduciary capacity with respect to retirement plans.  Nothing herein is intended to be, nor should be construed as, advice or a recommendation for a particular situation or plan.  Please consult with your own advisors for such advice.

 

Posted September 08, 2016 by

7 ways employers benefit from internship programs, even if interns don’t become full-time employees

 

College students are looking for internships this year, and some interns will secure full-time employment with the company for which they intern. Others will go back to the job search, seeking a new job with a different company.

It can be a dilemma for employers: Can we keep our rock star interns and hire them permanently, or do we let them go and watch them succeed somewhere else? That’s not always the best way to look at it.

“Regardless if you are able to add a talented new college grad or entry-level employee to your staff, employers should always remember the best internships are those that are well-designed, have specific goals, and set appropriate expectations for the interns that are hired,” says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates, and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs.

Translation: If you can’t hire an intern for a full-time job, all is not lost. Here are seven reasons why:

1. Strong Internship programs create a buzz/build your brand

“Given the enormous growth of social media, the best internship programs are important tools in enhancing and expanding the brand image of the employer on campus and in creating positive buzz about the company,” says LaBombard. Interns talk. They spread the good – and bad – about your company. Treat them well, and your business – and reputation – will benefit.

2. Internships help recruit for future job openings

The best interns may go on to working full timeEvery business has specific business goals and needs when hiring interns. Larger companies tend to use their internship programs as a way to evaluate interns for current or future employment (such as after graduation), while small and medium employers are more likely to hire interns to accomplish specific goals, like completing a well-defined project or to cover staff for the summer vacation season, says LaBombard. Both are crucial to business success.  And so is treating interns as you would any other employee.

“Even if full-time jobs will be only offered to a small subset of total interns, it is essential that each intern feels that she or he benefits from the experience and was treated fairly,” says LaBombard.

Can’t hire that intern now, don’t fret.

“Hiring needs can change rapidly, and that intern may soon be on your radar when seeking to fill a future opening,” says LaBombard.

Or, if that intern has a positive experience, they may seek to apply for other future job openings even after they have received one or two years of experience elsewhere.

Related: Northwestern Mutual’s internship program is their solution to an aging workforce

3. Internships build networking and business opportunities

If your intern goes on to do great things, and had a positive experience with your company, they may come back to seek your company services in another role, mention you to clients or vendors, or seek to partner with your business for future projects. You may be developing a future business partner.

4. Develops strong pipeline of future talent

Internship program fills your talent pipelineDid you hire a number of interns from one college or university? Did they have a great experience, but had to move on to other jobs? Don’t worry. These students will go back to their campus career center, professors, or peers, and reference the positive experience they had with your company. That means students from that college will be sure to keep your company at the forefront when seeking future internships, or full-time employment. Be honest and upfront with interns and keep lines of communications open about their performance, future opportunities, and next steps. This will ensure they view your company as a best place to work, and a place they would consider working for in the future. And a place they recommend to peers, professors, and campus career counselors.

5. Interns can make a positive impact on corporate culture

New ideas. New personalities. A new outlook. Those are all traits interns can bring to a department or business. This can help improve a company’s corporate culture, especially for employees who may be stuck in a rut. Maybe that new intern helps bridge some personality gaps and brings a team closer.

Also read: 5 reasons to look beyond your top schools and majors 

“A positive corporate culture is attractive to potential future hires,” says Bill Driscoll, District Presidentat Accountemps. “As much as possible, strive to develop a positive work environment where interns make the most of their skills and are exposed to different departments so that they will view the internship as a positive experience.”

6. Internships provide a way to get candid feedback about the company

Before saying goodbye to interns, make sure to conduct an exit interview. “It’s important for companies to part ways professionally because there is a chance you may work together again in the future,” says Driscoll. But take it a step further – use the exit interview to learn about areas where the company could improve or concerns that come up. These are things full-time/permanent employees may never share.

7. Helps understand true cost of recruiting and retaining employees

Don’t think you can afford to hire an intern right now? Can you afford to let that internship go to a competitor, or can you afford to spend more money to recruit and train a new employee in the future? That star intern already has experience with your company and can move right into a full-time role without missing a beat. This saves on the costs of recruiting and hiring a new employee, and keeps business moving forward, producing results with the intern who is now a full-time employee and that is already trained in and understand their role and the company.

An intern isn’t the only one getting invaluable experience and training. Employers can also benefit from hiring interns, even if they don’t become full-time employees.

Posted June 18, 2016 by

5 insurance facts for recent grads

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When an individual is starting their career, it’s important to realize that life will throw many unexpected events on their way. This is something that happens to everyone. Having the right insurance can make getting past a difficult situation a lot easier. Financial experts agree there are a variety of insurance options available. There are also some types of insurance that are considered essential for dealing with unexpected things that can occur at any age.

1.    Individual Situation

It can be a challenge for a person starting a career to know what insurance they should purchase. Purchasing the right kinds of insurance should be determined by a person’s individual situation. A number of factors will determine this. It will involve employment benefits, age, lifestyle, and more. There are four different types of insurance experts recommend everyone have. They are health insurance, life insurance, long-term, and short-term disability insurance as well as homeowners/renters insurance.

2.    Health Insurance

In many cases, people starting a career could be just one serious illness away from disaster. According to a study done by Harvard University, 62 percent of all bankruptcies in the United States were a result of health related issues. Over 75 percent had some form of medical insurance. If a person has health insurance through their employer, they may want to consider the best plan offered. The key to getting the best possible health insurance is for a person to do research and know all of their options. Sometimes the least expensive health insurance is not always the best deal. Even with rising high co-payments and deductibles, health insurance is still something people must have. A minimal health insurance policy is still better than not having any type coverage.

3.    Life Insurance

According to an article in US News, people don’t often think of purchasing life insurance until after they’re married and have children. The reality is a younger person will be able to purchase a life insurance policy at a very low rate. This policy will grow in value over time. These types of life insurance policies can be adjusted as a person gets married and has children. This is the time when a person’s death could cause a financial burden to those who depend on them. If a person is unmarried and does not have children, it is also important they purchase life insurance. There is a good chance they will leave behind debts such as student loans, credit card bills, auto loans that must be paid. Without life insurance, these debts will become the responsibility of family members.

4.    Disability Insurance

This is the type of insurance people starting a career believe they may not need. Nobody who becomes injured or disabled on the job believed it would happen to them. According to statistics from the Social Security Administration (SSA) approximately 30 percent of individuals entering the workforce eventually become disabled. These are disabilities that make it impossible for a person to work until their retirement age. Workers with the best health insurance, generous savings, and good life insurance are not completely prepared to become disabled. Health insurance will cover medical bills and hospitalization. It’s common for employers to provide their employees with both short-term and long-term disability insurance coverage. If a person is an independent contractor or owns their own business, they can get this type of coverage from a private insurer.

5.    Homeowners/Renters Insurance


When a person is starting their career, they may need to rent a place to live. There are some leases that require a person to have renters insurance. This type of insurance will cover a person coming into a rental unit and getting injured. It can also cover a person’s things that might be stolen. Should a renter make a mistake and cause damage to the rental unit, this type of insurance may cover the damage. Should a person own a home and have a mortgage, the lender will probably require them to purchase and maintain homeowners insurance. In many cases, failure to pay a premium may be reported to the lender. Homeowners insurance is designed to cover the destruction of a structure, its contents. It can also protect a homeowner if someone is injured on their property and much more.

Michael Rogers, guest writer

Michael Rogers, Operations Director of US Insurance Agents

Do you need help making other major life decisions as a recent grad? Keep reading our blog for more tips and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

 Michael Rogers is the Operations Director of USInsuranceAgents.com. With over five years of experience and knowledge in the insurance industry, Michael contributes his level of expertise as a leader and an agent to educate and secure coverage for thousands of clients.

 

Posted October 15, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Agricultural Sciences Majors

71.1% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Agricultural Sciences:

 

Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Pct of Other Agricultural Sciences grads in this occ
Animal Breeders  $21,500 7.9%
Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers  $55,200 6.3%
Managers, All Other  $23,200 4.9%
Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.
Posted October 15, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Conservation / Renewable Natural Resources Majors

64.3% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Conservation / Renewable Natural Resources:

 

Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Pct of Conservation/Renewable Natural Resources grads in this occ
Animal Breeders  $21,200 6.0%
Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians  $18,000 4.4%
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products  $26,500 4.1%
Conservation Scientists  $34,200 3.9%
Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.
Posted October 15, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Parks / Recreation, Leisure / Fitness Studies and Related Programs Majors

51.5% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Parks / Recreation, Leisure / Fitness Studies and Related Programs:

 

Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Pct of Parks/Recreation, Leisure/Fitness Studies and Related Programs grads in this occ
Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors  $25,500 7.8%
Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education  $34,400 4.6%
Retail Salespersons  $25,200 4.4%
Customer Service Representatives  $29,000 3.5%
Cashiers  $20,200 3.5%
Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants  $24,500 3.3%
Athletes and Sports Competitors  $34,900 3.3%
Managers, All Other  $34,000 2.6%
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers  $35,300 2.2%
Physical Therapist Assistants  $27,400 2.2%
Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education  $27,700 2.0%
Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors  $12,500 1.5%
Gaming Supervisors  $28,700 1.4%
Receptionists and Information Clerks  $26,300 1.4%
Physical Therapists  $16,800 1.3%
Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.
Posted October 15, 2015 by

Salary Data and Occupational Outcomes for Social Sciences Majors

52.3% of recent graduates in this major are employed full-time. These are the top occupations for recent graduates in Social Sciences:

 

Occupation First Year Avg. Salary Pct of Other Social Sciences grads in this occ
Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants  $28,400 4.9%
Child, Family, and School Social Workers  $26,500 4.4%
Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education  $30,200 3.2%
First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers  $28,400 2.6%
Retail Salespersons  $20,600 2.5%
Waiters and Waitresses  $24,300 2.3%
Managers, All Other  $36,300 2.2%
Customer Service Representatives  $29,000 2.2%
Emergency Management Directors  $49,700 2.2%
Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers  $46,800 2.1%
Business Teachers, Postsecondary  $23,900 1.9%
Receptionists and Information Clerks  $19,700 1.9%
Paralegals and Legal Assistants  $18,500 1.8%
Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors  $20,400 1.6%
Office Clerks, General  $25,000 1.5%
Desktop Publishers  $25,400 1.4%
Operations Research Analysts  $40,500 1.3%
First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers  $32,400 1.3%
Human Resources Specialists  $39,200 1.3%
Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks  $22,400 1.2%
Marketing Managers  $38,700 1.2%
Survey Researchers  $29,400 1.2%
Financial Managers  $42,800 1.1%
Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners  $60,100 1.1%
Sales Representatives, Services, All Other  $31,800 1.1%
Editors  $21,800 1.0%
Note: Values in the right hand column do not total to 100% as we do not include occupations of less than 1%. Data courtesy of Educate to Career.