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Posted January 19, 2017 by

It’s crucial for managers to learn to communicate across generations

 

The first thing one needs to realize once they move to a management role is this:

Your job has changed! Drastically.

Many people happily take on the title of ‘manager’ while assuming that most of what they will do and be responsible for on a day-to-day basis won’t be all that different, says MacKenzie Kyle, a management consultant and author of The Performance Principle: A Practical Guide to Understanding Motivation in the Modern Workplace. Given that there is limited time each day, and that management responsibilities are their own full-time job, this can result in significant personal stress, working excessive hours as the person attempts to do two jobs, and feeling like he or she has to ‘waste’ time on activities like communication and reporting, which doesn’t produce the same immediate and obvious results as ‘production’ work.

But, as a manager, it is now a big part of your daily job to effectively facilitate the flow of information. So don’t expect that as a manager you’ll get to avoid those regular status meetings or email updates; instead, you’ll be the driving force behind them.

“You are moving to a role that includes a significant component of communication,” says Kyle.

And that means communicating with different personalities, styles, and generations. That in itself is another great challenge all new managers must master. Especially for Millennials trying to communicate and report up across generations, specifically with baby boomers.

In fact, reporting challenges between generations in the workplace are an offshoot of the Grand Communication Canyon between Baby Boomers and Millennials, says Chris Butsch, author of The Millennial’s Guide to Making Happiness, a positive psychology book for young people driven by humor, science, and stories from Millennials around the world. So what’s driving these generations apart? Well, they both want something the other isn’t providing.

Millennials want feedback.

“I’m often asked why we seem to need feedback at every turn, and the answer is quite simple: this is the system we’re used to,” says Butsch. “We’re the most educated generation in America’s history; with over 50% of us holding college degrees. That means more than any generation before us, we’ve spent more time in the education system receiving precise feedback on everything. Even in college, which prepares us for work, we received a percentage score on every deliverable: Here’s what you did right, here’s where you screwed up, 89%, B+.”

But baby boomers are industrious and often bottom-line driven, says Butsch. So if you are a new manager communicating with a baby boomer follow these guidelines from Butsch when managing the flow of communication in the workplace:

Imagine this scenario: Yesterday morning, your client asked for something you have no experience in. This afternoon the manager who you report to asks this:

Haven’t heard from XYZ client in a week- how are things going?

BAD REPORT: Yesterday morning they asked for something I don’t know much about, so I’m kinda stuck. Could you help?

This response creates more questions and more work – baby boomers – often senior managers in today’s corporate hierarchy, hate this. Instead, impress them by showing how much work you’ve already done, covering the three bases above:

GOOD REPORT: (1) Things are well and we’re speeding towards go-live by Monday EOD. I’ve completed 5 of the 7 tasks this week. (2) However, they’ve asked for recommendations for ideal CRM software, and (3) while I’ve thoroughly researched the top 4 options (Pipedrive, Salesforce, Insightly, and Zoho), I don’t feel qualified to make a recommendation without experience. Could you connect me with someone who might have experience in this area?

The latter response tells them things are going well, you’re on schedule, and you specify precisely where you need help.

The biggest thing to remember when communicating as a manager, whether it’s with direct reports, or to senior leaders is this, says Butsch: Stop treating everyone the same.

Butsch references a 75-year-long Harvard study that found the No. 1 indicator of life satisfaction is the quality of our relationships. If you build relationships with the people around you, you’re also building trust, likability, and efficiency between you.

“Building a working relationship doesn’t necessarily mean being buddy-buddy with everyone; it means understanding them,” says Butsch.

How can new managers understand the many different personalities and work styles across generations in the workplace? Start by making mental baseball cards, says Butsch. Like this:

Danielle (hospital director)
Likes: directness, short meetings, short emails
Hates: getting lost in details, anyone who’s late

Kyle (scheduling software analyst)
Likes: positive feedback, 1-1 attention, clear walkthroughs
Hates: feeling lost, going too long without feedback

So if communicating with Danielle and Kyle, Butsch would spend an hour walking Kyle through a new workflow, then fire Danielle a 1-sentence email letting her know that the scheduling software is on track.

As you build these relationships, and start to understand each person’s own unique style – and quirks – you’ll simply enjoy working with more people, and will also build trust with them, meaning you’ll feel more comfortable asking for favors or support in times of need, adds Butsch.

The reality of the job of manager is often different than expectations, and a large number of people don’t find the activities of being a manager – all the communication, supporting other people to do the actual work while dealing with many of their problems, rewarding, says Kyle. But the manager’s role is to coordinate and support the production work (not to do it) and this requires significant time spent simply communicating with the members of the team. Learning how to communicate successfully with different personalities and across generations is a big factor in one’s success as a manager.

Are you ready to make that change? Then you’re ready to succeed as a first-time manager.

Want more management tips and career advice? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Four happy college graduates standing in a row. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted December 27, 2016 by

10 strategies December college graduates should follow for job search success

 

As 2016 comes to a close many college students have now handed in their final paper, taken the last exam of their collegiate careers and entered the job market. But according to a study of 503 entry-level job seekers by national career matchmaking firm GradStaff, recent college grads seem largely unaware of career opportunities and unsure of how to apply their skills in the workforce.  So what strategies can December college grads put into action now to create results that land a job? Start by following these 10 strategies for success.

1. Develop a strong value proposition: Start by developing a strong value proposition and identifying those important soft and transferrable skills, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates, and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs.

“These soft skills – such as critical thinking, effective communication, time management and leadership – are in high demand among prospective employers,” says LaBombard. “Grads should consider how and where they’ve applied these skills during college, whether in classes or extracurricular activities, or in non-professional jobs, including restaurant and retail service positions.”

2. Sell what you want to do next: Next, be prepared to talk about what it is you want to do now that you are graduated.  Everyone that you know, run into, or talk to, is going to congratulate you on graduating, then ask “what’s next?” or “what do you want to do now?” The “I’ll take anything” approach is not a good option, says Kathleen I. Powell, Associate Vice President for Career Development at The College of William & Mary, and President, National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Case in point, if you tell someone you’ll take anything, it’s hard for that person to find “anything.”

But…

“If you tell someone you’re interested in arts management, accounting, psychology, now you’ve given that person an area to focus on and they can start thinking of contacts in their networks,” says Powell.

3. Casual conversations can lead to opportunities: Don’t blow off those casual conversations with friends, family members – that wacky uncle just may be well-connected in an industry where you want to work and be able to point you to a job opening, a mentor, or someone with whom you can set up an informational interview. Members of your church, social networks, parents of high school friends, relatives of your significant other, when they ask “what’s next” they are generally interested – so be prepared to effectively sell your excitement of what you want to do next. That’s the only way they can possibly help you, by knowing what you truly want to do.

4. Network, network, network: Because, it really is about networking. Recent ADP employment reports show the bulk of all new job growth – often as much as 70-80 percent in a given month – is driven by small and mid-sized businesses. “These companies often don’t have the resources to recruit on campus, and tend to rely on referrals from employees, clients, vendors and other partners to identify candidates,” says LaBombard. “As a result, personal networking is critical. All entry-level job seekers should seize opportunities to ask parents, teachers, friends, clergy and even former employers for connections in industries of interest, and they should continue engaging with professional associations, alumni groups and others for face-to-face networking opportunities.”

LaBombard offers these additional tips:

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Posted December 12, 2016 by

Make your stressful job search more tolerable

stressful job searchContributing writer Ted Bauer

The old cliche rings out like this: there are two certainties in life. Death and taxes, of course. I would add a third: stressful job searches. Don’t fear, however. There are ways to make your job search more tolerable.

Here’s the interesting paradox around the stressful job search: if you’ve been on one in the last few years (more on that in a second), you know it’s stressful. Time-to-hire has doubled in the past four years; across a variety of positions, it’s now a little over a month. As a candidate, this means a rotating door of stakeholders, their requests and interviews. If you’re in that process with six or seven potential employers, it can get overwhelming. Michael Iacona, the founder/CEO of Rake, said this:

Applying to jobs takes a lot of time and effort. In fact, according to our research, 54% of job seekers find it challenging to keep track of their job search process.

The paradox? 15% of American workers, per Dale Carnegie research, are already actively looking for a new job — with another 26% set to begin in the next 6-12 months. That’s 4 in every 10 American workers with one foot out the door of their current job. Add in new graduates every few months and there’s a lot of job searchers out there. They keep doing it largely because of poor management in their existing jobs (most people leave bosses, not companies) and wanting to find the right fit.

So at this intersection of “I still want to do it” and “Oh Lord, it will be stressful,” what are ways to cope? Here are five tips.

Carve out designated periods of time to work on job search: I myself have been in a few prolonged job searches in the past couple of years; once after I finished graduate school and once about a year ago when I got laid off. Both were stressful and I was concerned about income. For a while, I was on LinkedIn and Indeed all the time, and constantly sending and checking emails. You know what happened? That made it way more stressful and prone to over-analysis. So I decided to dedicate 1 hour in the morning and 1 hour in the late afternoon to job searching, and that was it. It gave me a lot more perspective and calmed me down about it, which led to positive outcomes in both cases.  (more…)

Posted November 22, 2016 by

How coding bootcamps benefit both recent college grads and employers

College students using laptop computers in class

College students using laptop computers in class. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

With technology careers in high demand, coding bootcamps have become a popular method for recent college grads to gain the additional skills needed to jump start, advance, and succeed in a career in technology. Coding bootcamps are short – but intense – training opportunities focusing on teaching students the latest, in-demand technical skills.

Revature is a technology talent development company providing a turn-key talent acquisition solution for corporate and government partners and no-cost coding bootcamps for university graduates. Revature recently announced several strategic partnerships to provide free on-campus coding bootcamps with the City University of New York (CUNY)Arizona State University, Davidson College and the University of Missouri – with more partnership announcements planned into 2017. A college degree is required at the time of attendance for the on-site bootcamps. Students are typically graduates or even graduating seniors who are ready to deepen their skills and have a job when they graduate. The coding bootcamp is typically 12 weeks, full-time.

“Revature is training the next generation of software engineers, a profession that continuously needs people current – and even ahead – of the technology curve,” says Joe Vacca, CMO at Revature.We started these university partnerships to create a pathway to high-paying coding careers for graduates across the country.”

According to a recent report, 73% of coding bootcamp graduates surveyed report being employed in a full-time job requiring the skills learned at bootcamp, with an average salary increase of 64%. Roughly half of the jobs in the top income quartile — defined as those paying $57,000 or more per year — are in occupations that commonly require applicants to have at least some computer coding knowledge or skill. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, software development careers are projected to grow 17% through 2024.

(more…)

Posted November 09, 2016 by

College Recruiting Bootcamp: featuring Kamille Smith

kamille-smith at U.S. Office of Personnel ManagementWho is Kamille Smith?

Program Analyst, U.S. Office of Personnel Management

What you’ll hear from Kamille at the Bootcamp:

How to convert interns into permanent, full-time employees upon graduation

Why you’d be wise to listen to Kamille’s advice:

Kamille has about 10 years of experience in the Federal Government. She currently serves as a Program Analyst with the Recruitment Policy and Outreach, Pathways Programs for Students and Recent Graduates, at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. She provides training, technical guidance and support to the agencies’ Pathways Programs Officers and job seekers. She also played a vital role in OPM’s work on the Pathways Programs agency-wide Toolkit and Handbook for supervisors and managers.

The College Recruiting Bootcamp will be focused, fast and mentally challenging. Join us in D.C. on December 8, 2016 at the SEC headquarters. Reserve your space today!

Posted November 02, 2016 by

5 Ways to make the most out of your internship

Company meetingInternships are the new entry-level jobs. The job market is strong, but competition is fierce with more employers understanding the key role internships play in finding top full-time entry-level talent. If you hope to turn your internship into a full-time job, here are five ways you can impress your employer.

Picture this: you arrive on-site for your first day as an intern. You sit through a one-hour long meeting about policies, procedures, and payroll. Then someone hands you a list of 16 coffee orders and a detailed print order. These are your Monday morning duties. Off you go, juggling hot drinks and ink.

Wrong.

Erase that image, and let’s generate a new one. Today’s internships are more about contributing to real projects and less about delivering coffee. That’s not to say you won’t be asked to make copies, file paperwork, or take minutes during meetings. Some of your time may be spent on administrative tasks. But you can expect, as an intern in today’s workplace, to spend the majority of your time learning about what it takes to succeed as a full-time employee by contributing in significant ways.

This means you need to be prepared to contribute to your company in significant ways. You need to dispel myths you might have about what your internship will be like and strategically plan ways to brand yourself, professionally network, onboard successfully, and work diligently.

1. Make a great first impression during onboarding.

Ever heard of the primacy effect or negativity bias? Your first impressions stick with you, and anything negative you detect when you first meet someone sticks with you more than the positive things you detect.

It’s your job as an intern (new employee) to ensure that your fellow interns, other employees, and supervisors pick up a positive vibe when they meet you. This really starts during the interview process, but since you won’t meet most people until the onboarding process, focus on that. During onboarding meetings—which may require lots of sitting, listening, and learning—pay attention. Do your best to appear interested and engaged (even during meetings discussing company policies and accounting procedures… you might learn something!). Ask questions (but not too many questions).

Do not make the fatal egotistical error of believing your new employer is dying to know everything you know and believe. Trust me, they’re not. Employers hire interns to contribute to projects and to offer a new perspective, certainly, but they also hire interns to train, groom, and teach them to potentially join the company as full-time employees. If you brand yourself as a narcissistic know-it-all during onboarding, you’ll be off to a negative start.

2. Listen more than you speak.

This goes along with number one. Listening, a valuable soft skill, falls under the umbrella of communication skills. Employers repeatedly rank communication skills at the top of their preferred soft skill list for employees.

Showcase your own communication skills by listening more than you speak during meetings, at lunch, on the elevator, and while walking down the hall with your supervisor. Don’t interrupt. If you’re a chatty person by nature, how can you make this switch? By asking great questions. Plan ahead—write out a few key questions each night after you leave work.

When you listen to others, you give them the chance to teach you things you don’t already know and to disclose information you may otherwise never hear. In addition, when others listen to us, we feel important. If you foster a feeling of importance in your coworkers and supervisors, you’re on your way to branding yourself as a considerate, thoughtful team-player. Who doesn’t want to work with someone like that?

3. First things first—seek a mentor.

Within your first few weeks of your new internship, seek a workplace mentor. A workplace mentor is someone on-site, working within the company, who can serve as a reference point when you have questions or needs. Your mentor might also be willing to discuss growth opportunities within the company, give you pointers on professional and career development, and share her own secrets of success.

Look for a mentor who emulates qualities you admire. Does the mentor listen well and seem interested when you’re speaking? If not, ask someone else. Ultimately, your workplace mentor doesn’t need to be perfect, though. A workplace mentor isn’t necessarily a lifelong career mentor but can still provide plenty of valuable guidance temporarily.

4. View every conversation as a networking and branding opportunity.

Focus on doing your job well every day. While doing your job well, remember that you’re potentially conducting a semester or summer-long interview for a full-time job while completing your internship. This means you better view every conversation and interaction as a networking and branding opportunity. How you treat others, groom yourself, and speak on a daily basis can make or break your long-term employment potential.

Create business cards before you begin your internship. Carry them with you to work daily; you never know when the conversation will turn to talk of employment. Go to lunch with coworkers and supervisors when given the opportunity. Don’t hide out in your car, listening to music or playing on your iPhone. Prepare a genuine elevator pitch prior to being hired; don’t just ramble when people ask you why you’re working and what you plan to do with your life.

5. Let your work speak for itself.

Finally, do a great job every day at work during your internship. Don’t give half your energy to tasks. As we say in the dance and gym world, do it “full out.” Don’t hold back when you’re creating a document, designing a project, or even picking up or delivering lunch. Something as simple as returning earlier than expected demonstrates your ability to accomplish a task in a short period of time, and this impresses employers.

Let your work speak for itself—mouth closed, actions screaming. Don’t brag on yourself. There’s nothing admirable about that. Certainly document each accomplishment on your resume, and if interviewed for a full-time position, discuss these accomplishments at length. Until then, give it 100%, stay where your hands are, and you’ll be pleased with the results. 

Need help finding a great internship? Register with College Recruiter and search for internship opportunities. Don’t forget to follow us on TwitterLinkedInFacebook, and YouTube.

Career coach Bethany WallaceBethany Wallace is a career coach and adjunct English faculty member. She is passionate about helping job seekers succeed. An expert in higher education, she has worked for nine years as an English faculty member, a director of career services, and an academic adviser. Bethany also has experience in the corporate world in content management, technical writing, and non-profit management. Bethany earned her Master of Arts degree in English Language and Literature at Arkansas Tech University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in English at Lyon College. Bethany provides various career coaching packages and services for job seekers. Contact Bethany for a free consultation, or connect with her on LinkedIn.

Posted November 01, 2016 by

Why recent college grads shouldn’t overlook manufacturing industry careers

Photo courtesy of stockunlimited.com

Photo courtesy of stockunlimited.com

Seeking a career in manufacturing? Recent college grads should be sure to know this:

Manufacturing today is not your grandparent’s manufacturing. Take a job at a door and window company. Saying one works at a door and window company may not sound cool. But saying one works at an industry leader that has more than 75 active patents, is constantly developing new products, and creating new composite materials while using Smart Home sensors to revolutionize the door and window company – now that sounds cool. The company doing just that is Andersen Corporation, an international window and door manufacturing enterprise employing more than 10,000 people at more than 20 locations, with headquarters near St. Paul, MN.

“The misconception that we hear most often is that there is nothing cool and innovative about doors and windows,” says Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition Lead at Andersen Corporation.

At the core, recent college grads may view manufacturing careers as factory jobs – partially thanks to old stereotypes bestowed by parents and grandparents. But look closer and dig deeper – and recent college grads will find opportunities with innovative companies using cutting edge technology, engineering, and research and development to manufacture the next big thing.

The manufacturing industry allows recent college graduates to pursue “innovative, creative, and hands-on careers developing, testing, and reinventing products using the latest technologies and environmental and sustainability best practices,” says Swenson.

Jobs to be filled

There are roughly 600,000 unfilled manufacturing job openings in the United States and employers are demanding highly skilled workers in order to meet their needs, according to Manpower’s Future of the Manufacturing Workforce report.

“We are at a turning point in the manufacturing workforce environment in North America,” says Tom Davenport, author of the report. “There are major changes underway in the demand and supply for manufacturing workers – many driven by new technologies that will require new strategies and tactics for both companies and employees.”

Employers such as Andersen are seeking recent college grads and entry-level employees with these backgrounds:

  • Engineering: Chemical, mechanical, manufacturing, industrial, material science, plastics, electrical, environmental
  • Supply chain: Logistics, operations, sourcing, finance and accounting, IT, marketing, sales, human resources
  • Talent acquisition: staffing, generalist, learning and development, HRIT, communications, safety, sustainability, disabilities management, facilities, customer service, administrative support

According to Manpower’s Future of the Manufacturing Workforce report, employers also need skilled workers in roles that require extensive training such as machinists, operators, craft workers, distributors, and technicians. The industry also faces a generational skills gap as existing employees are nearing retirement age, creating an even greater demand for workers, especially those with engineering and IT backgrounds, says Swenson.

To fill those gaps, employers like Andersen are working hard to connect with job seekers at colleges and universities across the country. Campus recruiting is crucial in the manufacturing and current college students should pay close attention to campus recruiting fairs to find out when they can connect with manufacturers.

When searching for internships in the manufacturing industry, be sure to research the company before applying, or meeting at a campus recruiting event. Prepare in advance to secure an internship with a manufacturing company.

“Our interns are a true pipeline of talent for full-time positions as interns have the first opportunity to interview for any open opportunities before they leave at the end of the summer,” says Swenson. “We have converted a number of interns into full-time roles over the last few years.  In addition to meeting students at campus events, we begin our interview process on campus, and then invite our top candidates for additional interviews on site, as well as to tour our facilities.”

Soft skills important

Recent college grads must also have the soft skills employers seek. Those include communication, collaboration, leadership, curiosity, drive, determination, problem solving, and the ability to build relationships, says Swenson.

Women in Manufacturing

Careers in manufacturing provide wonderful opportunities for women, and employers and organizations are working hard to promote these opportunities. Women in Manufacturing is a more than 500-member-strong non-profit national association dedicated to supporting, promoting and inspiring women pursuing or working in a career in the manufacturing industry. Manufacturing Day is a nationally recognized event that is designed to expand knowledge and improve the general public perception of manufacturing careers, including those for women.

“There are a wide variety of rewarding roles both directly in the manufacturing environment and supporting manufacturing that can be attractive to women,” says Swenson. “Being a part of a team that creates a tangible product that enhances the beauty and energy efficiency of people’s homes is very rewarding for the window and door industry in particular. IT, engineering, sales, marketing, and many other opportunities exist at manufacturing companies just like they do at service and retail organizations. I would encourage women to think outside the traditional stereotype of manufacturing and realize that there are many ways to contribute to a manufacturing company’s success.”

Andersen also partners with organizations like the Society of Women Engineers to share the story of the company, as well as the stories of the number of women leaders in all areas at Andersen.

“It is important for us to continue the conversation about women in manufacturing, as well as celebrate and share the success of women in this industry so students see beyond the stereotype,” says Swenson.

When searching for opportunities in manufacturing, recent college grads should look for employers who provide training and growth opportunities. Andersen provides a number of career development programs for recent college grads that focus on research, development and innovation, operations, logistics, sales leadership, sales development, product manufacturing, lean/six sigma, and much more. Anderson also offer new college grads an opportunity to connect with other young Andersen professionals as they onboard into the company through the Andersen Young Professionals Network’s (AYPN), which helps support and help young employees grow by providing additional opportunities to engage cross functionally, learn developmental skills, and build relationships.

Top manufacturing employers understand the need to stay on top of recruiting trends to attract top talent.

“In order to continue to be the leader in our industry for over 110 years, we are constantly being innovative and staying competitive in our market place,” says Swenson.

Recent college grads can find many exciting and innovative opportunities in the manufacturing industry. Check them out. Your grandparents and parents will be surprised – and proud you did. And so will you.

Want to learn more about manufacturing careers? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition/Campus Relations at Andersen Corporation

Jennifer Swenson, Talent Acquisition/Campus Relations at Andersen Corporation.

Jennifer Swenson is a Talent Acquisition Lead and Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at Andersen Corporation, where she manages the company’s college relations and summer internship experience. Swenson is working to continue to build the Andersen brand on campuses across the country, as well as drive strategies to increase diversity and talent pipelines, as well as consistently create an excellent candidate experience. Connect with Jennifer on LinkedIn.

Posted October 21, 2016 by

10 unique career paths for college grads pursuing sport analytics careers

Group of businesspeople at work

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.com

The interest in sport analytics careers is growing at a rapid rate. So much that Syracuse University now offers an undergraduate degree in the field of sport analytics. College Recruiter profiled Syracuse University sports economist and analytics professor Rodney Paul, and he discussed the five skills college grads should master for success in a career in sport analytics.

While much of the focus is how sport analytics is impacting professional sports, the reality is different. Not everyone working in sport analytics works in professional sports. In fact, there are more sports analytics jobs outside sports organizations such as the NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, WNBA, and MLS than there are inside those organizations. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, data analytics jobs are growing at a rate of 27 percent annually, far exceeding the national job growth average of 11 percent. The sport industry is the fifth-largest economic sector in the U.S. economy, generating slightly less than $500 billion in 2014-15. Taking things a step further, The Sports Analytics Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2015 to 2021 research report valued the sports analytics market size at $125 million in 2014, but anticipated growth to reach $4.7 billion by 2021.

Below, we look at some sport analytics career paths to pursue if you have a background in analytics or data science. This field is constantly changing so there are job titles that haven’t been created yet. But getting started in these career paths are sure to help catapult a career in sport analytics:

1. Fantasy sports industry
The fantasy sports industry is booming, and so are organizations that use data and analytics to help fantasy sports players make data-driven decisions. How so? Learn more in this profile of a recent college graduate working for a sports analytics company that provides data and analytics-driven analysis to college and professional sports organizations – and fantasy football players.

2. Sports media industry
Sure, organizations like ESPN and Fox Sports hire analytics experts to make game predictions. But they are also using data and analytics to drive content-based decisions. John Wildhack, Executive Vice President, Programming and Production, ESPN, said this in an article discussing the Syracuse University undergraduate degree in sport analytics: “Increasingly, analytics are an integral part of many of our content offerings, both in the linear and digital space. As sports teams and leagues invest in analytics, it will create and drive content.”

3. Weather-related technology
Howard Hamilton is the founder and CEO of Soccermetrics Research LLC. He leads algorithm and software development of advanced team and player performance metrics, and is an internationally-recognized thought leader on the current and future state of soccer analytics. He is working on a project that uses analytics and data to decipher the outcome weather has on outdoor sporting events, such as soccer.

4. Retail industry
Under Armour is the fastest growing sports clothing and accessories company in the world. But as pointed out in this article, “the company appears to be looking to change the way athletes train and perform using data analytics.”

Nick Carparelli Jr., is senior director of college sports for UNDER ARMOUR®, and he sits on Syracuse University’s Falk College’s Sport Management Advisory Board.

“The process of making sound business choices always starts with investigation and research,” said Carparelli. “Effectively analyzing data, whether it be information about purchase intent from our consumers or a marketing evaluation on a prospective partner, is a critical next step in any decision making process. The ability to process and understand that information is a necessary skill set in our industry.”

5. Food and beverage industry
In 2014 Levy Restaurants announced the launch of E15, a subsidiary that provides advanced analytics services to sports, entertainment, and hospitality and retail organizations. E15 uses advanced intelligence to optimize user experiences and financial performance to other sports and entertainment venues, operations and teams, in addition to retail and hospitality clients. For example, E15 can provide data to professional sports teams to analyze how the score of a game, time of day or night, or other factors that impact a fans in-game food and beverage purchases.

6. Golf industry
Mark Broadie is a Carson Family Professor of Business and vice dean at the Columbia Business School in New York City, and the creator of the “strokes gained” method, which crunches mountains of data to show both professional and amateur golfers how to make better decisions on the course. Broadie wrote the book Every Shot Counts, where he uses analytics from the financial world to uncover secrets of the game of golf. Other companies like ShotLink use an analytics platform for collecting and disseminating scoring and statistical data on every shot by every player in real-time. For example, with ShotLink data, golfers can compare shots of 100 golfers who had a similar shot in the same location on the same course that a professional or amateur golfer does. Another company, 15th Club, focuses on “helping golfers win by applying intelligence and context to data.”

7. Health and wellness: Health care companies and sports injury specialists are using analytics to help analyze, determine – and yes, predict how, when and why sports injuries occur.

8. Corporate brand engagement: Want to work for an advertising agency? Using analytics and data can help you gain that coveted corporate sponsorship, or develop a brand campaign that helps a company and sports organization maximize exposure and sales.

9. High school sports recruiting and scouting: Analytics are already commonplace in professional and collegiate scouting. NCSA – National Collegiate Scouting Association, which specializes in recruiting, scouting and connecting high school athletes, is searching for a data analyst to help use analytics in a wide variety of scouting areas.

10. Mobile technology: No surprise here – mobile technology and sports are interconnected. Every sports organization is constantly seeking the latest in greatest in integrating fan engagement with a mobile experience that connects fans to their favorite sports team.

Sport analytics careers are hot, and they are changing fast. These are just a few of the many growing opportunities and sport analytics career paths to pursue. Those pursuing careers in sport analytics can benefit from following other resources such as the industry-leading MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, and by staying connected to College Recruiter. To do so, visit our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted October 18, 2016 by

Beyond the hammer and hard hat: Don’t overlook unique career opportunities in construction industry

jobs in the construction industry

Photo courtesy of Stockunlimited.com

Are you an entry-level job seeker looking in accounting or finance, information technology, human resources, project management, engineering, customer service, or administration? Are you a woman or minority seeking an industry with career growth and upward mobility?

Then look no further than a career in the construction industry. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the construction industry to see an employment growth of 13.6 percent, or almost 520,000 new jobs by the year 2024. Companies across the country are seeking recent college grads to fill open positions, but old school stereotypes about the type of jobs and skills needed to succeed in the construction industry still exist – and that causes many recent college grads and entry-level job seekers to overlook careers in the construction industry.

Tim Mayer, Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company (KA), understands those challenges and stereotypes, and he and other industry professionals are working diligently to change the perception and awareness about opportunities in construction.

Breaking down construction industry stereotypes

Kraus Anderson has about 500 employees, is based in Minnesota, and has a wide variety of divisions, but is primarily known for its commercial building division. When recruiting for open positions, Mayer and team face many of the same stereotypes as other construction companies across the country.

“The biggest misconception is one of men in hard hats swinging hammers and providing other labor,” says Mayer. “This is obviously a big part of what is needed in the industry, but also neglects the need for highly-educated and trained people in the construction and support roles listed above. In actuality, the construction industry is really a service industry with a focus on building and maintaining relationships.”

Tips for recent college grads seeking a career in the construction industry

Mayer says current college students and recent college grads seeking opportunities in the construction industry should research a company where they are interested in working at to find out about internships, and current job openings. The Kraus Anderson college recruiting program focuses on project and field engineer internships, and has also hired interns in accounting and HR role, pending on need. The company has developed relationships with about 13 colleges and universities to help fill internship roles throughout the company.

“I think there are some major misconceptions about careers in the construction industry that I have seen proven wrong time and time again in my over five years in the construction industry,” says Mayer. “I think most people would be surprised to learn that construction is also a very well paying industry, with an entrepreneurial spirit, where development and increased responsibility are readily available to those willing to learn and stretch their skills.”

Mayer is the prime example. He works in the construction industry, but he fills an important human resources leadership role in that industry. He received a B.A. in History from Saint John’s University in Collegeville, MN., and an M.A.in Human Resources and Industrial Relations from University of Minnesota’s Industrial Relations Center at the Carlson School of Management. Prior to KA, Mayer worked at Mortenson Construction, where he served as senior talent acquisition specialist.  He was also a senior professional recruiter for Manpower Professional.

“Even though I have never built a project, I take great pride in pointing out landmark projects that the company has built,” says Mayer. “There is a real pride with the tangible and long lasting nature of our end products. The value of our work to society can never be underestimated as it is always visible.”

Women and minorities encouraged to apply

As for those seeking opportunities to wear the hard hat and swing a hammer – those opportunities are also available, and KA and other construction companies are working hard to attract more women into construction opportunities. There are many local and national organizations that partner with construction firms to help promote opportunities for women in construction and the trades. The National Association of Women in Construction is a network for professional women in the field of construction.  The Washington Women in Trades Association was created for women working in the trades to gather and share information. Tradeswomen, Inc., is one of California’s first organizations for women in the trades and one of its goals is to recruit more women into construction and related non-traditional trades. Just about every state has an organization that supports careers for women and minorities in construction and the trades. Kraus Anderson is active in sponsoring and partnering with women’s campus organizations, as well as growing their partnership with the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

“We have a variety of initiatives to continue to build diversity into our workforce with recruiting efforts targeted toward women, minorities, veterans, and others underrepresented in our field,” says Mayer. “These efforts not only target recent grads and experienced hires, but build deeper foundations through community involvement and support of organizations that reach students in elementary school to continue to build the notion that construction is a great field.”

Mayer continued: “I think old stereotypes persist, because there was some truth to them for such a long time. We realize that different educational backgrounds, skill sets, approaches, and life perspectives bring great value to our ability to deliver projects now and into the future.”

Soft skills crucial to success in construction industry

What do recruiters look for when hiring recent college grads in the construction industry? Soft skills stand out, says Mayer.

“Relationships are the cornerstone of our business, and because of that we seek candidates that can effectively communicate and coordinate/lead/manage large groups to foster these lasting relationships focused on solving problems,” says Mayer. “It is a given that a candidate needs to have a core set of construction skills to work in this industry, but the soft skills are the true differentiators that we seek. In today’s market, the candidates that have these skills are typically well taken care of and happy where they’re at. To get these candidates in the mix we are focusing on leveraging employee referrals and building a strong employment brand.”

Recent college grads, don’t overlook careers in the construction industry. It’s a great place to build a career. Get a jump start on learning about careers in the construction industry by signing up for personalized construction industry job alerts here. We’ll send you new job leads tailored to your interests and preferences and save you the trouble of searching for them on a regular basis.

For more job seeker tips and advice visit our blog and follow us on LinkedInFacebookTwitter, and YouTube.

 

Featuring Tim Mayer, Kraus Anderson, on careers in the construction industry. Jobs in the construction industry.

Tim Mayer is Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company.

About Tim Mayer
Tim Mayer is Director of Talent Acquisition for Kraus-Anderson Construction Company (KA) where he is responsible for creating and leading the company’s end-to-end hiring strategy. Mayer is strategically implementing a proactive strategy to attract top talent for KA’s immediate needs and build a pipeline for future needs, as the company grows. He applies a big-picture approach to provide an excellent candidate experience, while recruiting managers, grooming company leaders and providing a seamless transition as long-time employees retire.

 

Posted October 12, 2016 by

Ask Matt: Recent college grads shouldn’t let helicopter parents hinder their job search

Helicopter parents in the job search; Tips for recent college grads

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Dear Matt: I’m responsible for hiring entry-level employees for a large company, and I am amazed at how many recent college grads have their parents reaching out to us on behalf of their children – they even show up at interviews! I thought helicopter parents were only involved at the youth and high school level. But we’re now seeing it in the business world. Can you remind your readers and all recent college grads that parental involvement shouldn’t take place in the workplace?

Matt: By one definition, a helicopter parent is a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child’s or children’s experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Helicopter parents are also prevalent at the youth and high school level, often hovering over their children and every decision involving those children at youth or high school activities, in school, or with friends.

And now, helicopter parents are invading the workplace. Yikes! It’s true.

“Believe it or not, recruiters and hiring managers are seeing a surprising influx of parental involvement in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process,” says Brandi Britton, district president for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. “As a staffing firm, we’ve heard our share of helicopter parent stories and experienced some unique situations with moms and dads ourselves.”

Today’s working parent can be a great resource for that recent college grad seeking job search advice, or with connecting them to members of their professional network. But they shouldn’t accompany their child to job interviews, contact employers on behalf of their child, or listen in on speaker phone or Skype/Facetime during the interview. Those are all things that are happening today and all things recent college grads should be sure to avoid to land that first job, or move forward in their career.

According to a survey of 608 senior managers by Office Team, 35 percent of senior managers interviewed said they find it annoying when helicopter parents are involved in their kids’ search for work. Another one-third (34 percent) of respondents prefer mom and dad stay out of the job hunt, but would let it slide. Only 29 percent said this parental guidance is not a problem.

The reasons for mom and dad getting involved are simple, says Britton: Recent college grads may not have as much job search experience and therefore turn to their parents for guidance.

“The job search process can be extremely challenging and daunting,” says Britton. “Parental support and advice throughout the process can help you stay positive and on track.”

But…

“Although most parents mean well with their efforts, they need to know where to draw the line to avoid hurting their son or daughter’s chances of securing a job,” says Britton

Managers were also asked to recount the most unusual or surprising behavior they’ve heard of or seen from helicopter parents of job seekers. Here are some of their responses:

  • “The candidate opened his laptop and had his mother Skype in for the interview.”
  • “A woman brought a cake to try to convince us to hire her daughter.”
  • “One parent asked if she could do the interview for her child because he had somewhere else to be.”
  • “A father asked us to pay his son a higher salary.”
  • “One mom knocked on the office door during an interview and asked if she could sit in.”
  • “Parents have arrived with their child’s resume and tried to convince us to hire him or her.”
  • “A job seeker was texting his parent the questions I was asking during the interview and waiting for a response.”
  • “Once a father called us pretending he was from the candidate’s previous company and offered praise for his son.”
  • “Parents have followed up to ask how their child’s interview went.”
  • “A father started filling out a job application on behalf of his kid.”
  • “I had one mother call and set up an interview for her son.”
  • “Moms and dads have called to ask why their child didn’t get hired.”

When it comes to parental involvement in the job search, Britton provided the five biggest mistakes college grads make when involving parents in the job search:

  1. Parents should avoid direct contact with potential employers. They should not participate in interviews or call, email or visit companies on behalf of their children.
  2. Job seekers should be the ones filling out the applications and submitting resumes, not their parents.
  3. Helicopter parents should steer clear of involvement in following up after their child has applied or interviewed for a position.
  4. Having your mom or dad try to bribe a potential employer is a definite no-no. In our survey, one woman brought a cake to a company to try to convince them to hire her daughter.
  5. Parents shouldn’t be involved in job offer discussions, such as negotiating salary or benefits.

“Parents should absolutely not be included in their children’s job interviews,” says Britton. “The meeting is meant to be a discussion involving only the interviewer(s) and job candidate. “Parents participating in interviews can distract from the goal of making sure it’s a fit for the applicant and employer. The employer is evaluating whether to hire the applicant — not his or her parent.”

Employers usually appreciate candidates who are assertive, but when a parent is clearly handholding or answering questions for their child, it sends the message that the individual lacks initiative and independence, adds Britton.

Does this automatically eliminate a candidate?

“Not all employers will automatically take a candidate out of contention if his or her parents become too involved in the job search, but chances are that most hiring managers would be put off by this type of behavior,” says Britton. “Parents who become overly involved in their children’s job searches can cause more harm than good because employers may question the applicant’s abilities and maturity.”

Professionals need to take ownership of their careers – they’re responsible for applying to and ultimately landing positions. So how can parents assist recent college grads in the job search? Britton offered these additional tips on how parents can assist recent college grads in the job search:

  1. Uncovering hidden job opportunities: Family members and others in your network can be great sources for advice and help you uncover hidden job opportunities.
  2. Job search and interview preparation: It’s perfectly fine to tap your parents for behind-the-scenes assistance, such as reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews or offering networking contacts.
  3. Access to professional contacts: Parents or those in their network can provide access to contacts at companies or alert you to opportunities.
  4. Resume and cover letter review: Have your mom or dad review your resume and cover letter to ensure they’re error-free and clearly showcase the most important information.
  5. Mock interview assistance: Prepare for interviews by practicing responses to common (and tricky) questions with your parents. They can also provide constructive criticism regarding your answers and delivery.
  6. Decision-making: Juggling a few offers? Children may want to get their parents’ opinions when weighing potential opportunities. But ultimately, it’s the job seekers decision, not the parents.

“Parents want the best for their kids, but being overly involved in a child’s job search can cause more harm than good,” says Britton. “It’s a positive for mom and dad to help behind the scenes by reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews and offering networking contacts. However, ultimately, companies seek employees who display self-sufficiency and maturity.”

Want more tips and advice on how to successfully navigate the job search? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Matt Krumrie

Matt Krumrie

About Ask Matt on CollegeRecruiter.com
Ask Matt is a new monthly career advice column that offers tips and advice to recent college grads and entry-level job seekers. Have a question? Need job search or career advice? Email your question to Matt Krumrie for use in a future column.