• 5 ways STEM/technical grads can develop soft skills employers covet

    May 25, 2017 by

     

    Good news for STEM grads: Those with degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math can expect to earn the highest starting salaries among 2017 grads. That’s according to the Winter 2017 Salary Survey report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). According to the NACE report, the top three starting salaries for recent college grads with bachelor’s degrees are in these STEM fields:

    • Engineering – $66,097
    • Computer science – $65,540
    • Math and Science – $55,087

    While STEM grads are currently hitting the job market at full force, another group of job seekers are also starting their career: The graduate from the two-year technical college. Like STEM jobs, hot jobs for those with two-year technical backgrounds include air traffic controller, nuclear technician, computer programmer, and electronic engineering technician.

    Translation: Skilled workers with both two and four year degrees are in demand.

    But skilled workers with the education, and the right soft skills, are the one’s getting hired. With thousands of STEM or technical school grads now in the workforce, employers hiring recent college grads or entry-level employees are looking for more than just the right educational background.

    “A degree isn’t what’s going to set you apart from other candidates,” says Jena Brown, Talent Acquisition Marketing and Brand Leader at Kerry, a leader in the food, beverage, and pharma industries, with 23,000 staff and 100+ innovation and manufacturing centers across six continents. “It’s usually required for technical positions, so you can’t stand on that alone.”

    In fact, those who get hired often stand out because of the soft skills they are able to articulate in an interview. This may be why chief information officers (CIOs) surveyed by staffing firm Robert Half Technology named communication skills (28 percent) and problem-solving abilities (21 percent) as the top areas where skilled and technical professionals could improve.

    To stand out, according to Robert Half, skilled workers need to show employers:

    • You are an effective communicator
    • You have a strong understanding of business (even better if you have specific knowledge of the potential employer’s company or industry)
    • You have a history of coming up with creative solutions to problems

    Brown agrees. Recruiters are looking for the job seeker who has something extra to bring to the team, whether it’s a personality that fits corporate culture, or the ability to make an impact beyond a basic job description: Someone who is a team player, willing to help out even if it isn’t part of the daily routine, or someone who shines bright and empowers those around them.

    “We want to hear what you did to hone your business skills during the time you were earning your degree,” says Brown. “We want to see that you are looking ahead, seeing the larger picture and preparing yourself to maximize the career opportunities that await you.”

    What are the top soft skills Brown and her team look for when recruiting recent college grads with technical backgrounds? Brown referred to these key skills:

    1. Communication Skills: Regardless of the type of organization one works for, effective communication across all levels is a critical soft skill for technical new grads. This is especially important in larger organizations, like Kerry for example, which have a complex matrix organizational structure. What is a matrix organization? According to study.com: A matrix organizational structure is a company structure in which the reporting relationships are set up as a grid, or matrix, rather than in the traditional hierarchy. In other words, employees have dual reporting relationships – generally to both a functional manager and a product manager.

    Can you do your work – and communicate technical information in a non-technical manner to others on the team, or across the organization? That’s important.

    2. Teamwork: The ability to work in diverse, cross functional teams is important. “This goes hand in hand with flexibility,” says Brown. “Be malleable and teachable while contributing your valuable knowledge within teams.”

    Large organizations have teams, reporting structures, and chains of command to follow. Being a part of that team, and working with others outside your team, and understanding how to fit in goes a long way towards success.

    3. Professionalism: The ability to navigate a corporate environment, meet deadlines, conduct meetings, and contribute helps give recent college grads credibility in any role. Show up on time, do your job, ask appropriate questions, don’t make excuses. That’s a good start.

    4. Leadership: Those who are able to lead and influence without the authority that comes with a title go the furthest, says Brown. Many entry-level employees don’t focus on developing leadership skills early in their career. But finding a mentor can assist with the leadership development process.

    5. Consultative and presentation skills: These skills “can take you far regardless of level (or career path),” says Brown. Consultative skills focus on behaviors that deliver consultative value to internal customers and external clients.

    Brown looks for recent college grad with those types of unique skills when recruiting and hiring those with technical backgrounds. She was once one of those consultative employees with a technical background, needing to succeed with non-technical co-workers and teams. She recruited employees for a company that provided customized technical services and platforms to huge companies around the globe.

    “This was challenging because we were subject matter experts in designing and building customized MS solutions, which took very specific technical skills, but much of what we did was onsite at the customer site which required soft skills like a sales person might have,” says Brown.

    How can recent college grads develop consultative or presentation skills? Joining industry associations or networking groups, and becoming an active member is one way. Volunteering at industry events is another way.

    “If you can communicate in a consultative manner and present effectively it will get you more opportunities as you advance in your career,” says Brown. “While daunting at first, if given the opportunity to present and get visibility, do it.”

    For many college students, there is nothing more daunting than earning a STEM degree, or completing a technical degree. Now that you are graduated, you need to take it to the next level. Start by mastering these soft skills to stand out, get noticed, and get hired.

    When you do, a great salary, and great career opportunity awaits.

    Want more tips and advice on the important skills recruiters covet? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • College grads wanted for entry-level community banking careers

    March 23, 2017 by

     

    Recent college grads seeking entry-level jobs in the banking industry are heading into the field at the right time. That’s because many baby boomers who hold senior-level positions are expected to retire in the next five to ten years, and community and regional banks are looking for recent college grads and entry-level job seekers to emerge as industry leaders.

    “America’s banks employ more than two million people with various backgrounds, skill sets and job functions,” said Mike Townsend, a spokesman for the American Bankers Association. “Thousands of baby-boomer bankers are likely to retire within the next decade, and opportunities for advancement will be abundant for the next generation entering the workforce.”

    The need for emerging talent is a real issue across the country, including in the state of Ohio, where many banking jobs are going unfilled because there aren’t any workers to fill the openings, according to Bob Palmer, president of the Community Bankers Association of Ohio.

    “There is a talent drain occurring very quickly in our industry,” Palmer said in the article Clark State adds banking program to meet demand for workers.

    “The majority of those involved are older and in the later stages of their careers and we are experiencing a large amount of retirement,” said Palmer, who added, “quite frankly if we don’t have the talent to take care of our local community here, there will not be a place for community banks.”

    The leaders at the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS) are aware of the shortage, and working to fill the skills and talent gap. CSBS is a nationwide organization of financial regulators from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The vision of CSBS is to be the recognized leader advancing the quality and effectiveness of regulation and supervision of state banking and financial services.

    The CSBS has created the Community Bank Case Study Competition, partnering with representatives from 33 Universities across the county for an engaging and experiential learning opportunity for undergraduate students as they interact with local businesses by partnering with community banks to conduct case studies. Students who participate in the CSBS gain valuable, first-hand knowledge of the banking industry through interactions with bank executives and networking opportunities. The competition is also an opportunity for students to sharpen research and analytical skills, practice problem solving, and enhance communications skills.

    “The competition gives students an opportunity to learn in a tangible way about community banking,” said Mike Stevens, Senior Executive Vice President of CSBS. “They also get direct engagement with bankers and other business leaders, expanding their network.”

    The case study competition energizes both students/participants and experienced professionals already working in the industry.

    “The (students) bring much needed energy to banking,” said Stevens. “When the winning team presents at the CSBS-Federal Reserve research conference, the bankers are happy to see students interested in what they do. The energy and attitude in the room changes dramatically.  One thing that surprised me is that everyone who participates in this project – faculty, students, bankers, and judges, all say how inspiring it is to see the work product and engage with the students.”

    Stevens says entry-level jobs in community banking are a great career path for recent college grads truly looking to learn a wide variety of skills.

    “Community and regional banks provide a lot of opportunities for an entry level banker,” said Stevens. “Community bankers really have to do it all.  A recent college grad coming into a community bank has the opportunity to learn about nearly every area of a bank in a relatively short time period.”

    What many recent college grads overlook is the fact that they don’t always have to have a background or education in finance to start an entry-level banking career.

    “Banks need people with a variety of skills – marketing, information technology, security, legal,” says Stevens. “I hear many hiring managers say, ‘give me someone who can write, speak, and think through issues, and I can teach them about banking.'”

    Below, we look at the education, soft skills, and keys to success for recent college grads seeking entry-level banking career opportunities:

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  • The job seeker’s guide to identifying and avoiding job search scams

    March 16, 2017 by

     

    Fake email addresses. Copycat web sites. Requests for personal information before a job is offered. Interviews conducted only via instant messaging. Promises of salary that are too good to be true. Requests to submit payment to move to the next step of the job search.

    These are just a few of the dirty tactics scumbags use to try and scam job seekers, including inexperienced job seekers like recent college grads and entry-level job seekers. The threat is real, and like any online or cyber threat, the people conducting the fraudulent activity are often trying to gather information to steal one’s identity or money.

    The team at College Recruiter takes the threat of job search scams and fake job postings seriously, and has implemented a multi-step process that identifies and blocks the vast majority of identity thieves and other scammers from ever posting a job to College Recruiter. In fact, every single job advertisement placed on College Recruiter goes through an in-depth verification process to prove the job posting is legitimate, and all ads are verified through actual contact with a human with the employer posting the job ad – something not every job board can claim.

    “Here at College Recruiter, we take these fraudulent attempts very seriously and work daily to ensure all the jobs that are posted on our web site are from verified employers to protect our job seekers from applying, interviewing, and becoming victims of identity theft,” says Dani Bennett, Sales and Client Services Manager at College Recruiter.

    In the article Rise of Recruitment Scams Hurt Both Job Seekers and Employers Alike, the team at  global outplacement and executive coaching firm Challenger, Gray, & Christmas identified some recent and unfortunately, popular job search scams. What may be surprising to many is that these scams don’t just target small companies. Here are some examples:

    1. Scammers created a false ad for Rio Tinto, one of the world’s largest metals and mining corporations. When a job seeker responded, the person who received the email asked for additional personal information, such as tax files, driver’s license, and birth certificate. Scammers then used this information to open credit cards and bank accounts. The messages from these so-called recruiters sound legitimate. In the Rio Tinto case, the recruitment email included an application with the company’s name and logo.

    Remember, anyone can set up a fake web site or email account, for example through free email providers like Gmail, Yahoo!, or Hotmail. College Recruiter, however, will not accept any job postings that use a free email provider to receive job applications.

    1. In another incident in Houston, scammers set up an actual interview, via Google hangout, using the name of a reputable company, and then offered a position. The scammers then asked the job seeker to move around large sums of money, in this scenario, up to $3,000. To carry this out, they sent fraudulent checks made out to the job seeker to start a home office, then asked the job seeker to forward that money to a third party vendor.

    “Any time a company asks you to pay or hold money for them, you should immediately see red flags,” said John A. Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. “A credible employer would never ask their employees to move money through their personal accounts. That’s why companies have accounting departments.”

    1. In July, Shell Oil, one of America’s largest oil and natural gas producers with over 22,000 employees, posted a notice on its careers site warning job seekers that scammers were using the Shell name and logo to recruit for positions.

    Besides the obvious problem for job seekers, the toll these scams can take on a company’s reputation is huge, says Challenger. Most employers don’t know these fraudulent job postings are out there until they are contacted by job seekers who have figured out it’s a scam and contacted the legit company directly. By then, the company reputation is already damaged with those job seekers.

    “From a recruitment perspective, once a company’s brand has been associated with these fraudulent ads, it may be difficult to attract the talent needed when a position becomes available,” says Challenger.

    College Recruiter Founder Steven Rothberg added, “Some job boards, like College Recruiter, have formalized, proactive, anti-fraud measures in place, but many job boards are more reactive and rely upon their users to complain about fraudulent postings before the job board takes any action.”

    Not only do cyber criminals post fake job ads, unethical recruiters also post fake job ads, often on sites where they can post free job ads. Why would they do that? To act like they are “well-connected” and have a long list of candidates to choose from. A recruiter may submit these resumes to the employer for which they are hiring for, to show activity – which employers value when working with recruiters – and that they have an active pipeline of candidates, when they have no intentions of responding to, interviewing, or hiring these employees.

    How can a job seeker spot a fraudulent job posting, or job search scam? Follow these tips from the Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and North Dakota:

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  • Why employers covet soft skills developed working in the restaurant and retail industry

    February 14, 2017 by

     

    Note to those restaurant employees who get frustrated going to work on a Saturday night while friends are preparing for a night out on the town.

    Employers understand the sacrifices you are making, and in the long run, it will pay off. Why?

    Because employers covet recent college grads and entry-level job seekers who have restaurant industry experience. Sure, that doesn’t help when you feel you are missing the must-attend social event of the year (you’re really not) because you have to go to work, but it’s going to pay off when applying for that first job.

    Same goes for that retail worker, who goes to class all day and closes up shop every night, or who has to pull a double shift on a Sunday when other workers call in sick (because they did go to that social event the night before).

    Thousands of college students and recent college grads work restaurant jobs and retail jobs, and whether they know it or not, they are developing transferable skills that employees seek in recent college grads and entry-level job seekers.

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  • 10 strategies for securing a summer internship

    February 07, 2017 by

    Remember what your teachers and professors constantly said, from kindergarten through college? There are no bad questions.

    The same goes for internships. There are no bad internships. Whether it’s at a small company, large company, start up, non-profit, public or private company, government agency (the list goes on), there is tremendous value in an internship.

    In fact, there are even hidden benefits of internships that go bad.

    But obtaining an internship takes hard work, planning and preparation. And to obtain an internship this summer, college students and recent college grads need to start the process now.

    “The internship cycle is a moving target and seems to be starting earlier and earlier,” says Kathleen Powell, Associate Vice President for Career Development for The College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and President of the National Association of Colleges and Employers. “In fact, college career centers work with many employers who are looking to fill internships in the fall semester. But don’t let that dissuade you, start the process now.”

    So what does one have to do to land an internship this summer? Follow these tips and strategies for success:

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  • What HR can learn from Cubs manager Joe Maddon

    January 30, 2017 by

     

    Contributing writer Ted Bauer

    Even if you’re not a baseball or sports fan, one of the bigger non-political stories of 2016 was the Chicago Cubs ending “the curse of the Billy Goat”. The last time the Cubs won the World Series, there hadn’t been a World War yet. After 108 years, they finally won again. There is a message in here for HR and managers.

    There are a lot of reasons why the 2016 version of the Cubs was the team to finally win a championship. The 2003 team had been great, for example, but lost because of another “cursed” situation. Other Cubs teams in 108 years had the ability to win it all. None did. What was different about the 2016 team?

    First, one main factor was that over time, they put a lot of quality young talent together. Eventually, some of those players began hitting their peak around the same time.

    Second, and maybe more importantly, there was an influential person who was tasked with making sure everything was on the same page. That person was Cubs’ manager Joe Maddon. Maddon had only been hired in 2014 after a successful run as manager of the Tampa Bay Rays (he got them to the 2008 World Series, although they lost).

    Maddon has an unconventional style, including printing t-shirts for his team that say “Try Not To Suck:”

    He does other unconventional things, too — hiring DJs, for example, or choosing to live downtown when most MLB managers (often well-paid) opt for large houses outside the city their team represents.

    What are the lessons that managers or HR teams could take from Maddon? Continue Reading

  • It’s crucial for managers to learn to communicate across generations

    January 19, 2017 by

     

    The first thing one needs to realize once they move to a management role is this:

    Your job has changed! Drastically.

    Many people happily take on the title of ‘manager’ while assuming that most of what they will do and be responsible for on a day-to-day basis won’t be all that different, says MacKenzie Kyle, a management consultant and author of The Performance Principle: A Practical Guide to Understanding Motivation in the Modern Workplace. Given that there is limited time each day, and that management responsibilities are their own full-time job, this can result in significant personal stress, working excessive hours as the person attempts to do two jobs, and feeling like he or she has to ‘waste’ time on activities like communication and reporting, which doesn’t produce the same immediate and obvious results as ‘production’ work.

    But, as a manager, it is now a big part of your daily job to effectively facilitate the flow of information. So don’t expect that as a manager you’ll get to avoid those regular status meetings or email updates; instead, you’ll be the driving force behind them.

    “You are moving to a role that includes a significant component of communication,” says Kyle.

    And that means communicating with different personalities, styles, and generations. That in itself is another great challenge all new managers must master. Especially for Millennials trying to communicate and report up across generations, specifically with baby boomers.

    In fact, reporting challenges between generations in the workplace are an offshoot of the Grand Communication Canyon between Baby Boomers and Millennials, says Chris Butsch, author of The Millennial’s Guide to Making Happiness, a positive psychology book for young people driven by humor, science, and stories from Millennials around the world. So what’s driving these generations apart? Well, they both want something the other isn’t providing.

    Millennials want feedback.

    “I’m often asked why we seem to need feedback at every turn, and the answer is quite simple: this is the system we’re used to,” says Butsch. “We’re the most educated generation in America’s history; with over 50% of us holding college degrees. That means more than any generation before us, we’ve spent more time in the education system receiving precise feedback on everything. Even in college, which prepares us for work, we received a percentage score on every deliverable: Here’s what you did right, here’s where you screwed up, 89%, B+.”

    But baby boomers are industrious and often bottom-line driven, says Butsch. So if you are a new manager communicating with a baby boomer follow these guidelines from Butsch when managing the flow of communication in the workplace:

    Imagine this scenario: Yesterday morning, your client asked for something you have no experience in. This afternoon the manager who you report to asks this:

    Haven’t heard from XYZ client in a week- how are things going?

    BAD REPORT: Yesterday morning they asked for something I don’t know much about, so I’m kinda stuck. Could you help?

    This response creates more questions and more work – baby boomers – often senior managers in today’s corporate hierarchy, hate this. Instead, impress them by showing how much work you’ve already done, covering the three bases above:

    GOOD REPORT: (1) Things are well and we’re speeding towards go-live by Monday EOD. I’ve completed 5 of the 7 tasks this week. (2) However, they’ve asked for recommendations for ideal CRM software, and (3) while I’ve thoroughly researched the top 4 options (Pipedrive, Salesforce, Insightly, and Zoho), I don’t feel qualified to make a recommendation without experience. Could you connect me with someone who might have experience in this area?

    The latter response tells them things are going well, you’re on schedule, and you specify precisely where you need help.

    The biggest thing to remember when communicating as a manager, whether it’s with direct reports, or to senior leaders is this, says Butsch: Stop treating everyone the same.

    Butsch references a 75-year-long Harvard study that found the No. 1 indicator of life satisfaction is the quality of our relationships. If you build relationships with the people around you, you’re also building trust, likability, and efficiency between you.

    “Building a working relationship doesn’t necessarily mean being buddy-buddy with everyone; it means understanding them,” says Butsch.

    How can new managers understand the many different personalities and work styles across generations in the workplace? Start by making mental baseball cards, says Butsch. Like this:

    Danielle (hospital director)
    Likes: directness, short meetings, short emails
    Hates: getting lost in details, anyone who’s late

    Kyle (scheduling software analyst)
    Likes: positive feedback, 1-1 attention, clear walkthroughs
    Hates: feeling lost, going too long without feedback

    So if communicating with Danielle and Kyle, Butsch would spend an hour walking Kyle through a new workflow, then fire Danielle a 1-sentence email letting her know that the scheduling software is on track.

    As you build these relationships, and start to understand each person’s own unique style – and quirks – you’ll simply enjoy working with more people, and will also build trust with them, meaning you’ll feel more comfortable asking for favors or support in times of need, adds Butsch.

    The reality of the job of manager is often different than expectations, and a large number of people don’t find the activities of being a manager – all the communication, supporting other people to do the actual work while dealing with many of their problems, rewarding, says Kyle. But the manager’s role is to coordinate and support the production work (not to do it) and this requires significant time spent simply communicating with the members of the team. Learning how to communicate successfully with different personalities and across generations is a big factor in one’s success as a manager.

    Are you ready to make that change? Then you’re ready to succeed as a first-time manager.

    Want more management tips and career advice? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • How to thrive in your new job when a bad manager cramps your style

    January 05, 2017 by

     

    Congratulations on landing that first job out of college. The hard work has paid off.

    Now welcome to the real world. A world where bad managers can quickly turn fun, exciting new jobs into a recent college grad’s worst nightmare.

    “Getting a job one loves is a wonderful accomplishment for recent college graduates,” says Laura Poisson, President of ClearRock, Inc., a Boston-based career transition, outplacement, leadership development, and executive coaching firm. “However, having to deal with a bad manager can make that new job a nightmare. It is often hard, especially for a younger person or someone who is new to a company, to determine the best way to deal with a difficult boss.”

    LaSalle Network, a national staffing and recruiting firm, recently published a survey of more than 1,000 people on their experiences with bad bosses. The survey findings showed that 84% of respondents have had a bad boss, and 43% of respondents quit the company because of the bad boss. In addition, the survey found that 59% of respondents would have stayed if given the opportunity to report to someone else. According to the survey, these were the main characteristics that respondents attributed to bad bosses:

    • Only notices negatives, never the positives (56%)
    • Are narcissistic; only care about themselves, not their staff (45%)
    • Clueless; never know what is going on and/or are forgetful (44%)
    • Absent; they are never there (31%)

    If you have a manager that’s cramping your style, think things through before approaching your manager, HR, or other co-workers. Why?

    There may be things you don’t realize, but that matter. For example, consider this:

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  • 10 strategies December college graduates should follow for job search success

    December 27, 2016 by

     

    As 2016 comes to a close many college students have now handed in their final paper, taken the last exam of their collegiate careers and entered the job market. But according to a study of 503 entry-level job seekers by national career matchmaking firm GradStaff, recent college grads seem largely unaware of career opportunities and unsure of how to apply their skills in the workforce.  So what strategies can December college grads put into action now to create results that land a job? Start by following these 10 strategies for success.

    1. Develop a strong value proposition: Start by developing a strong value proposition and identifying those important soft and transferrable skills, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates, and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs.

    “These soft skills – such as critical thinking, effective communication, time management and leadership – are in high demand among prospective employers,” says LaBombard. “Grads should consider how and where they’ve applied these skills during college, whether in classes or extracurricular activities, or in non-professional jobs, including restaurant and retail service positions.”

    2. Sell what you want to do next: Next, be prepared to talk about what it is you want to do now that you are graduated.  Everyone that you know, run into, or talk to, is going to congratulate you on graduating, then ask “what’s next?” or “what do you want to do now?” The “I’ll take anything” approach is not a good option, says Kathleen I. Powell, Associate Vice President for Career Development at The College of William & Mary, and President, National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Case in point, if you tell someone you’ll take anything, it’s hard for that person to find “anything.”

    But…

    “If you tell someone you’re interested in arts management, accounting, psychology, now you’ve given that person an area to focus on and they can start thinking of contacts in their networks,” says Powell.

    3. Casual conversations can lead to opportunities: Don’t blow off those casual conversations with friends, family members – that wacky uncle just may be well-connected in an industry where you want to work and be able to point you to a job opening, a mentor, or someone with whom you can set up an informational interview. Members of your church, social networks, parents of high school friends, relatives of your significant other, when they ask “what’s next” they are generally interested – so be prepared to effectively sell your excitement of what you want to do next. That’s the only way they can possibly help you, by knowing what you truly want to do.

    4. Network, network, network: Because, it really is about networking. Recent ADP employment reports show the bulk of all new job growth – often as much as 70-80 percent in a given month – is driven by small and mid-sized businesses. “These companies often don’t have the resources to recruit on campus, and tend to rely on referrals from employees, clients, vendors and other partners to identify candidates,” says LaBombard. “As a result, personal networking is critical. All entry-level job seekers should seize opportunities to ask parents, teachers, friends, clergy and even former employers for connections in industries of interest, and they should continue engaging with professional associations, alumni groups and others for face-to-face networking opportunities.”

    LaBombard offers these additional tips:

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  • Make your stressful job search more tolerable

    December 12, 2016 by

    stressful job searchContributing writer Ted Bauer

    The old cliche rings out like this: there are two certainties in life. Death and taxes, of course. I would add a third: stressful job searches. Don’t fear, however. There are ways to make your job search more tolerable.

    Here’s the interesting paradox around the stressful job search: if you’ve been on one in the last few years (more on that in a second), you know it’s stressful. Time-to-hire has doubled in the past four years; across a variety of positions, it’s now a little over a month. As a candidate, this means a rotating door of stakeholders, their requests and interviews. If you’re in that process with six or seven potential employers, it can get overwhelming. Michael Iacona, the founder/CEO of Rake, said this:

    Applying to jobs takes a lot of time and effort. In fact, according to our research, 54% of job seekers find it challenging to keep track of their job search process.

    The paradox? 15% of American workers, per Dale Carnegie research, are already actively looking for a new job — with another 26% set to begin in the next 6-12 months. That’s 4 in every 10 American workers with one foot out the door of their current job. Add in new graduates every few months and there’s a lot of job searchers out there. They keep doing it largely because of poor management in their existing jobs (most people leave bosses, not companies) and wanting to find the right fit.

    So at this intersection of “I still want to do it” and “Oh Lord, it will be stressful,” what are ways to cope? Here are five tips.

    Carve out designated periods of time to work on job search: I myself have been in a few prolonged job searches in the past couple of years; once after I finished graduate school and once about a year ago when I got laid off. Both were stressful and I was concerned about income. For a while, I was on LinkedIn and Indeed all the time, and constantly sending and checking emails. You know what happened? That made it way more stressful and prone to over-analysis. So I decided to dedicate 1 hour in the morning and 1 hour in the late afternoon to job searching, and that was it. It gave me a lot more perspective and calmed me down about it, which led to positive outcomes in both cases.  Continue Reading