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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 25, 2020 by

U.S. government is hiring interns for virtual work

Across the country, Covid-19 (coronavirus) has made hundreds of thousands of college and university students unsure about their summer internships. Some accepted internships and aren’t sure if they have one to go to. Others were trying to find one, and are now finding that process to be even more difficult.

Fortunately, one very large employer has not changed its plans, in part because its internship program was built from the ground up to be virtual. That employer? Uncle Sam a/k/a the U.S. federal government.

Through the Virtual Student Federal Service (VSFS) program, students can work on projects that advance the work of government on multiple fronts. Projects include helping counter violent extremism, strengthening human rights monitoring, developing virtual programs, engaging in digital communications, mapping, economic and political reporting, data analysis, graphic design, and app building.

According to VSFS, the program is accommodating and flexible. “Through VSFS, students can intern from wherever they are – from dorm rooms to libraries to coffee shops, or anywhere in the world with a broadband or Internet connection. Students set their own schedules too – working on projects on a timetable that fits their life.”

Students can also choose projects from a wide variety of agencies – more than 40 federal agencies. But no need to apply 40 times. Instead, students apply to their top three choices anytime in July. Interviews are conducted in August. Offers are extended in early September.

If you’re hired as an eIntern, you’ll work on your project for 10 hours a week from September through May and some schools will even provide you with course credit.

To find these opportunities, search CollegeRecruiter.com in July. Best of luck!


Julie Ann Sowash of Disability Solutions

Posted March 21, 2020 by

Faith Rothberg of College Recruiter and Julie Ann Sowash of Disability Solutions Selected by NACE to Deliver Presentation on How Programmatic and CPC Impact-Diversity and Inclusion

Minneapolis, MN (March 20, 2020) — Job search site, College Recruiter, announced today that its chief executive officer, Faith Rothberg, will deliver a presentation at the 2020 National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) annual conference in Minneapolis with Julie Ann Sowash, Executive Director of Disability Solutions.

NACE is an American nonprofit professional association for college career services, recruiting practitioners, and others who wish to hire the college educated. It boasts a membership of more than 8,100 college career services professionals at nearly 2,000 colleges and universities nationwide, more than 3,100 university relations and recruiting professionals, and the business affiliates like College Recruiter that serve this community.

This year’s conference will be held at the Minneapolis Convention Center from June 2nd through 5th. Approximately 2,500 career service, recruiting, and others typically attend these annual conferences.

“I was thrilled to be notified by NACE that the proposal that we submitted was accepted by their annual conference selection committee,” said Rothberg of College Recruiter. “We felt that the proposal would likely be of interest to them and the attendees to the conference as inclusion is a core value for NACE. We admire their passion to foster and support individual and organizational diversity and inclusion to advance equity in all facets of the Association.”

According to Sowash of Diversity Solutions, “Our plan is for Faith to begin the presentation with an introduction to how programmatic and cost-per-click advertising work. Attendees will see how an employer might use one and not the other, but they typically work together. I’ll then discuss how they may undermine diversity and inclusion efforts by steering advertising budgets to the job search site or other media property that offers the lowest pricing, which is often very different from delivering the diverse – candidates employers are seeking.” Instead of just identifying the problem, Faith and Julie will – recommend a solution that is simple to implement and will, we hope, be adopted by employers seeking diverse candidates including recent graduates and talent with disabilities.

About College Recruiter

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other organizations who want to hire dozens or even hundreds of students and recent graduates of all one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities for part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs. For more information, call 952.848.2211, email Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com, or visit www.CollegeRecruiter.com.

About Disability Solutions Disability Solutions works with employers to help strengthen their workforce through diversity and inclusion. We partner with top companies to deliver people and business-driven outcomes by developing recruiting and engagement strategies for the disability community – delivering custom solutions in outreach, recruiting, talent management, retention and compliance. For more information, call 203.203.6220., email Info@DisabilityTalent.org, or visit www.DisabilityTalent.org.

Posted March 19, 2020 by

Resources for students, grads searching for remote work due to COVID-19

The rapidly escalating coronavirus pandemic is creating havoc in the lives of almost everyone worldwide. Estimates regarding the number of people laid off or whose employment will be terminated vary widely but, yesterday, the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department said that we could see an unemployment rate of 20 percent if we don’t flatten the curve.

If you or someone you know has lost their job or are nervous that your upcoming internship or other job offer won’t be available when you’re ready to start, then here are some resources:

Resources for Remote Work: 

  • Standuply’s list of 330 remote work tools
  • Skillcrush’s list of skills needed for successfully working from home
  • The Muse’s advice on how to find home-based jobs
  • Zapier’s article on how to find work-from-home jobs
  • An article written before the COVID-19 pandemic about the state of remote work
  • List of 25 sites that are good for finding remote work
  • A similar list of 18 sites which are good for finding home-based employment
  • A shorter but still good list for places to find telecommuting jobs
  • A list of 25 companies that hire virtual employees
  • Workplaceless, which is a professional development organization for remote work, they help universities and businesses understand how to best learn, grow and lead remotely
  • And, of course, College Recruiter, which currently has almost 10,000 job posting ads from employers who are trying to hire students and recent graduates who want to work from home

We’re all in this together. Let’s flatten that curve!

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter

Posted February 11, 2020 by

What has changed in the job board industry since College Recruiter went live in 1996?

College Recruiter’s chief executive officer, Faith Rothberg, was recently interviewed by a learning and development company. One of the questions they asked was how the job board industry has changed since our site went live way back in 1996.

Two of the biggest things that have changed are how employers treat candidates and the technology used to bring the two together. 

Employers treat candidates with far more respect now than they did in the mid-90s. Some of that has to do with the economy because it is far harder to hire well-qualified people today than it was 25 years ago. But some of that has to do with efforts by groups like The Talent Board, which runs the Candidate Experience Awards. We were very active in helping that organization get off the ground and continue to advocate for it. It uses a carrot instead of stick approach by praising employers for treating candidates well instead shaming those who don’t. 

On the technology side, we can use College Recruiter as an example of how much and how fast it has changed. We have had seven versions of our website in 23 years. That might sound like a lot, but that’s an average of one roughly every three years.

When we launched in 1996, only 50 of the Fortune 500 had websites and none of those had a searchable database of jobs that allowed candidates to apply on-line. Instead, you could sometimes search but usually there would just be a generic page that described at a high level the kinds of candidates the employer was seeking and you’d be asked to mail, fax, or maybe email your resume instead of applying online to a specific posting. Today, virtually every company with more than a few hundred employees has an applicant tracking system and, therefore, searchable job postings that allow you to apply to specific postings. Many of those integrate assessments so you sometimes aren’t even able to apply if you’re unqualified. In short, as compared to 25 years ago, candidates and employers spend far less time today trying to find each other and candidates spend far less time applying to jobs. That allows them far more time to make sure that they are a good fit for each other.  Are there any trends you’re following for 2020? In terms of technology or otherwise?  

A trend we’re following for 2020 is something that we’ve invested a tremendous amount of time and money preparing for. College Recruiter is one of the only niche job boards in the world to have successfully migrated our employer customers from duration- to performance-based pricing. Duration-based pricing was like buying an ad in the newspaper: you paid $X to run your ad for Y days. We still offer $75 postings for 30-days because many employers prefer to buy that way, but most of our customers now pay for every candidate that we send to them, usually by click. If we run an ad and don’t send candidates to the employer then we don’t get paid. Our interests, therefore, are better aligned and the employer no longer has to post-and-pray.

At the same time as pay-for-performance is rolling over some of our out-of-date competitors like a tsunami, automated systems are determining where job ads run. This is called programmatic job ad distribution and the sites which get to run an ad, for how many days, and for how much money will be the ads which get the best results. In the mid-1990’s, the sites that got the ads were those which had the funniest Superbowl ads. If your job board delivers quality candidates in the quantity desired by the employer, then you’re going to continue to receive similar ads from that and other employers and the amount you get paid for the candidates you deliver to the employer will increase, so you’re making more money and your customers are happy about that.

In addition the changes taking place on the tech side, there’s also been a lot of changes on the candidate side. In the mid-1990’s, the candidates entering the workforce were the youngest members of Gen X and oldest Millennials. Now, the oldest Millennials are approaching 40 and the generation entering the workforce is Gen Z. With the rise of Gen Z has also come a lot of talk about the future of work. Will there be work or will AI displace all of us? If there is no work or not enough for the vast majority of people, will we all receive a universal basic income (UBI) and, if not, how will we survive?

There’s been a long term trend moving away from living to work toward working to living. What I mean by that is far more than Baby Boomers, Gen Z wants to make a positive impact on the world. They place greater value on their personal relationships and understand that they cannot count on an employer to be loyal to them during difficult times. They value working hard and seek financial security but, sadly, they don’t expect to find it. 

Regarding the future of work, look for more freelancing and gig work not because the people want it but because corporations are demanding it. Look for more flexible working relationships including project-based work and remote work. 

Employers should be prepared: the gig economy will make recruitment easier but retention harder. Employers will be able to staff up and down faster but their workforce will be less experienced and be less efficient. 

In our college recruiting niche, we’re seeing a rapidly increasing minority of employers becoming school- and even major-agnostic. Employers are starting to use productivity data to determine where their best hires come from and they are finding that its more about the person and less about the school or major. We’re excited about that, because we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, not just those from the elite schools. 

We’re sometimes asked if there is one thing that we would advise talent acquisition teams to do differently with these Gen Z candidates. The answer is no different than if we were to advise them as to what to do differently with a Boomer, Gen Xer, or Millennial because we all want the same thing from prospective employers: do a better job of communicating to the candidates about the positive impact they can have on the world around them by working for your organization. Gen Zers get the attention around this issue because it appears to matter more to them at the age they’re at than it did to previous generations, but who doesn’t want to make the world a better place, both while they’re at work and on their own time?

Some of the advise we give to candidates has changed over the years, because the underlying issues have changed. For example, we talk a lot more now about starting salary because that has become so critical. Employers tend to increase pay by percentages rather than the value you deliver, so if you start off being paid too little you’ll likely always be paid too little. If your boss doesn’t value your work as shown by underpaying you, try to find a different job within the same company where your work will be better valued as shown by your compensation. And if that doesn’t work, find a new employer. 

Hopefully, candidates understand that we are NOT telling them to quit their jobs to get paid better. That strategy can work, but it is far better to find a way to get paid better by your current employer. A key to making that happen is for the employee to understand that the vast majority of employers want to compensate their employees fairly. Unfortunately, some hiring managers don’t know what fair compensation is. The reality is that employees can find this information as easily as employers and employees should use that information to negotiate a fair starting salary. This has become even more crucial for Gen Z candidates than generations before because Gen Z employees are carrying so much more student debt when they finish school than previous generations.

The last couple of questions for Faith were about industry jargon. She was asked for her favorite and least favorite terms. Her favorite was CPC (cost-per-click) because our successful migration from duration- to performance-based pricing such as CPC is driving fantastic growth at College Recruiter.

On the flip side of that jargon coin, she said her least favorite was matching technology, simply because it doesn’t work. It would be great if it did work but the reality is that it needs massive amounts of great data to work well. The data partially comes from the resume which is a backward-looking document and Gen Z candidates are so early in their careers that their resumes simply don’t have much data on them.

The data also comes from job postings which are forward-looking documents and tend to be very poorly written. For example job postings almost always talk about the employers requirements, many of which are actually preferences, and typically talk little about job duties. So you’ve got this situation where the Gen Z candidate can’t show much yet but the employer will only be matched with them if they’ve accomplished a lot professionally. That might work well for an engineer with ten years of experience but it fails miserably for a young adult who has had a couple of part-time jobs and maybe one internship.

Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter

Posted February 04, 2020 by

What was the original idea for College Recruiter and what problems were we trying to solve?

College Recruiter’s chief executive officer, Faith Rothberg, was recently interviewed by a learning and development company. One of the questions they asked was about the history of our company, including what problems we were attempting to solve.

The company out of which College Recruiter grew was founded in November 1991. We were publishing maps and employment magazines for college campuses for the first few years.

In 1995, a couple of us were in a career service office at the University of Minnesota when the director said to us, “There’s this thing called the Internet”. She said that she didn’t know what it was but that some of her students were using it to research companies they were about to interview with. In those days, the best way to do that research was to go into the career service office and go through their collection of annual, corporate reports until you found the one for the company you were researching or, just as often, found that it was missing.

We paid a high school student who was working for us $3,000 to build the first version of our website. We launched in November 1996. Looking back, it was incredibly rudimentary but not at all uncommon for the era. Job seekers could either search by category or location, but not both. So you could run a search for engineering jobs or jobs in Illinois but not engineering jobs in Illinois.

The problem we were trying to solve was to try to find a way to help every student and recent graduate find a great career. It was — and remains — important to us that we didn’t just serve some students and hardly any recent graduates or just students from some schools. We wanted to be inclusive and not exclude students simply because they happened to attend the “wrong” school. Unfortunately, we still see that approach a lot amongst some of our indirect competitors.

We’re currently in the middle of launching the seventh version of our software. True to our desires way back in 1996, our site is built from the ground-up to be inclusive. About 2.5 million job seekers use our site a year and every one of them has full access to every part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level job advertised on our site as they search by their desired location and keywords. The keywords can be job title, major, military occupation code (MOC), and in just about any language.

So, if you grew up in Philadelphia, are attending a school in Los Angeles, and want to find a job in Houston, you’re going to able to do that on College Recruiter. It is very, very unlikely that your career service office website will have any jobs listed in Houston and, if it does, it will likely only be a very, very small number. At College Recruiter, we typically have about 750,000 jobs advertised on our site at any given time.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How the CIA uses productivity data to win support for its D&I programs

Most of Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire dozens or even hundreds have diversity and inclusion programs because their talent acquisition and other human resource leaders know that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce.

But many and perhaps most of these TA and HR leaders struggle to get the resources they need for their D&I programs. Why? Because these TA and HR leaders have not been able to win support for these programs from their CEO, CFO, and other C-suite executives.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our closing keynote presenter was Roynda Hartsfield, former Chief of Hiring for the CIA’s Directorate of Digital Innovations (DDI) and current Head of Talent Acquisition for Excel Technologies, LLC. Roy wowed the 125 people in the room plus the hundreds watching the livestream as she walked through how she and other members of her team at the CIA first used data to demonstrate to its C-suite how their most diverse and inclusive teams were also their most productive teams and then won the resources to make the CIA’s diversity and inclusion efforts even stronger.

After her presentation, Roy was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Gerry Crispin, Principal and Co-Founder for CareerXroads and Co-Founder of TalentBoard.org, which works to improve the candidate experience by defining, measuring, and improving the treatment of job candidates;
  • Ankit Somani, Co-Founder for AllyO;
  • Marjorie McCamey, Corporate Development for intrnz and Corporate Recruiter for Franklin Templeton.

Are you struggling to win the resources you need from your C-suite? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How to recruit employees with Asperger’s Syndrome

Conferences can be tremendous opportunities to learn, but too many conferences cover the same topics over and over and over again and sometimes it is even the same presentation by the same speaker. But not always. Sometimes, the topic is new to the attendees, or presented in a markedly different manner.  

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our featured presenter was Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants. Jo shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how and why leading employers are reaching out to candidates with Asperger’s Syndrome not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes business sense to do it.

After her presentation, Jo was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Keca Ward, Senior Director of Talent Acquisition for Phenom People;
  • Jon Kestenbaum, Executive Director of Talent Tech Labs;
  • Janine Truitt, Member of College Recruiter’s content expert board and Chief Innovations Officer for Talent Think Innovations; and
  • Lois Barth, Principal and Human Development Expert for Lois Barth Coaching & Consulting Services.

Are you debating whether to recruit people with Asperger’s or struggling to retain them? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates, including those with Asperger’s? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How EY built a better workforce through diversity and inclusion

One of the nice things about attending conferences is the opportunity to learn from experts.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our opening keynote speaker was Ken Bouyer, Americas Director for Inclusiveness Recruiting for Ernst & Young. Ken shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how EY built a better workforce through gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, and generational diversity and inclusion.

After his presentation, Ken was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Dawn Carter, Director, Global University Recruiting for Uber;
  • Kimberly Jones, former talent acquisition leader for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, GE Aviation, Raytheon, Honda, and Nationwide and currently CEO of Kelton Legend;
  • Pam Baker, Member of College Recruiter’s Content Expert Board and Founder and CEO for Journeous; and
  • Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants.

Are you struggling to improve your diversity and inclusion efforts? Who isn’t? Watch the one-hour video of the presentation and panel discussion:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

Why should we care about diversity and inclusion?

Employers all claim — and most of them mean it — that they want to hire the best person for the job. At College Recruiter, we call that putting the right person in the right seat.

No one would dispute that an employer should hire the best person for the job, but reasonable people often differ as to how to determine who is the best person. If you’re hiring a salesperson, is the best person the candidate who has already demonstrated their ability to sell your kind of product to your existing customer base? Or is it the person who seems to have the most potential to sell the most to your existing customer base but who has not yet demonstrated that ability? Could it be the person who is most likely to sell your product to an entirely new customer group? Something else?

We recently discussed these issues at length at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference. We chose to spend the day with 125 talent acquisition leaders discussing why and how employers should diversify their college hires because so many of our customers use our targeted email and other products to reach out to underrepresented groups such as women, people of color, military veterans, people with disabilities, and more.  These leading employers know that the more diverse and inclusive their workforces, the more productive are those workforces.

Want to learn more about why we should care about diversity and inclusion? Watch the 15-minute video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted October 16, 2019 by

To hire students, you need to recruit on-campus. Right? Wrong.

At College Recruiter job search site, one of the biggest changes that we’ve seen over the past few years is the rapidly increasing number of employers who use time-to-hire, cost-per-hire, and productivity data to measure their sourcing partners, including college career service offices. Their findings are shocking to many.

For decades, employers believed that they had to travel to and recruit students on-campus if they wanted to hire “the best” candidates. Those beliefs were typically grounded on false assumptions. You’ve probably heard that productivity data shows that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce. But that means that an employer who only hires at a small percentage of the 3,000 four-year colleges and universities or the 4,400 one- and two-year colleges is undermining their own diversity and inclusion efforts. So the more targeted your campus recruiting efforts, the less diverse, inclusive, and productive will be your workforce. Ouch.

Another example? Many of our employer customers who have looked at their productivity data have discovered that the more elite the school the employee went to, the less productive is that employee. How can that be true? Because they leave far sooner than those hired from second or even third-tier schools. One of our long-time customers is an accounting and consulting company. They cut way back on their on-campus efforts in favor of hiring through what they call “virtual” sources like College Recruiter. Why? Diversity, inclusion, and productivity. They’re becoming school and even major agnostic, meaning they don’t really care what school you went to or even what your major was. They used to only consider accounting, economics, and finance majors. Now they embrace fine arts, Russian literature, and any other major. In their words, “we can teach an employee how to read a balance sheet but we can’t teach them how to think critically”.