ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 05, 2018 by

From internship to full-fledged career: how one Fortune 500 company is recruiting from within

 

Author: Kate-Madonna Hindes

Investing in entry-level workers creates greater job stability and more opportunities for advancement for employees, contributing to a more economically vibrant society.(Rockefeller Foundation)

Every single day, new relationships are forming, and interns are turning into full-time employees. Across thousands of different companies, H.R. and recruiting departments are making long-term investments for maximum growth and profitability. Smart companies are taking note while searching for interns to see if they have the qualities they are looking for in full-time employees.

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Posted September 22, 2018 by

8 tips for how to hire nurses

Nurses. Year-after-year, we hear from hospitals, doctors’ offices, and other organizations how frustrated they are in trying to hire nurses, whether they are entry-level, recent graduates or have years of experience.

Before I dig into some suggestions for how any organization can hire more nurses, let’s first examine whether the underlying premise of a shortage is even true. Well, it’s true. “Currently there are nearly three million jobs for registered nurses, and there are more than 2.9 million licensed RNs, which doesn’t seem like a significant shortage,” said Joe Dunmire, executive director of Qualivis. “But 21 percent of licensed RNs are not engaged in patient care, which makes the actual deficit nearly 700,000.” To make that worse, Qualivis expects that there will be more than a million RN vacancies by 2024, which is more than twice the deficit of the last major nursing shortage.

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Posted June 21, 2018 by

How to train your existing employees in applied technology skills

Any employer recruiting for tech talent will likely have their own take on what the tech skills gap looks like at their organization, but closing the gap is essential. Alexandra Levit, Chairwoman of Career Advisory Board, workforce consultant and author of several career-related books, says it’s important not just to identify tech skills, but to also take very concrete steps to train your existing employees in applied technology skills. That might be through internal coursework, bringing in a consultant or having employees do self-study. Alexander spoke at SHRM 2018, presenting “The tech skills gap is more complicated than you thought, but closing it is within your reach.” We interviewed her to dive deeper into what employers need to understand about the complexities of the tech skills gap and how they can close it at their own organizations. (more…)

Posted June 11, 2018 by

How Blain’s Farm and Fleet improves their retail employee performance

 

Andrew Marcotte knows how to improve the performance of entry-level retail employees. He is an HR Business Partner at Blain’s Farm and Fleet, a specialty discount retailer with 38 locations. Marcotte supports store operations and store management teams across all locations. He shared with us what they do to motivate, grow and develop entry-level employees and we have shared his insight below. Marcotte was selected as an official SHRM 2018 blogger.  (more…)

Posted April 19, 2018 by

Succession planning should include development of entry-level talent: Interview with Kelly Renz

 

Succession planning often focuses on executive roles only, but as Kelly Renz of The Novo Group says, “that’s missing the boat.” I caught up with Renz, who is CEO of The Novo Group, where they believe better people means better business. She claims to be a non-conformist when it comes to business practices and she’ll be a speaker at SHRM 2018, presenting “Demystifying Succession Planning: It’s Easier Than You Think!” She insists that succession planning is not rocket science and has great insight into the importance of developing your entry-level talent.

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Posted April 11, 2018 by

Diversity and inclusion in university relations: From compliance to increased productivity

 

SHRM18 Blogger GraphicFor years, I’ve been hearing employers talk about the importance of hiring a diverse workforce. Probably my first encounter with a formalized approach to attain this goal was way back in 1989 when I worked for Honeywell as a student. Down the hall from my department was our Office of Affirmative Action. Typical for that era, the reason for the existence of the office was far more about compliance than furthering any other business objective.

Now let’s flash forward a couple of decades. Not only were the names of these offices changing to include words like diversity but so were the objectives. Some of the world’s largest and most respected employers of college and university students and recent graduates were diversifying their candidate pools. They weren’t doing it just for compliance. More importantly, they were seeing data showing that more diverse workforces were more productive workforces. (more…)

Posted April 10, 2018 by

Attract students and grads with your wellness program, especially financial wellness

 

Wellness programs don’t just reduce costs by increasing the likelihood that your employees show up for work. A holistic and well managed wellness program can also serve as a recruitment tool.

We know healthy employees who balance their work and personal lives are more productive. We know that poor physical, emotional and financial health distract employees while they are working and take them away from work to deal with personal issues. Employers have the opportunity to not only increase productivity but also attract talent by providing holistic wellness services. One important element to attract and support younger talent is a robust financial wellness program. Here we compile the expertise of several experts in wellness programs to help you sort out what will benefit your organization.  (more…)

Posted March 19, 2018 by

Redefining the role of the college and university relations recruiter

Recruiting and advertising for open positions has changed. Before industrialization, virtually every place of employment was a solo or small operation. Without power, it was difficult to scale anything. All of a sudden with electricity, you could have factories with production lines. Employers needed to quickly go from having a couple people working in their facility to maybe even hundreds or thousands.

Advertising for jobs nowadays is mostly done through social media, networking, and employee referrals. When you only need to hire a few people, chances are you already know them. In that case, no advertising is needed. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, explains that if you now have to suddenly start hiring dozens, hundreds or thousands, it’s very unlikely that you’re going to know enough people to fill those positions. Rothberg recently presented “Redefining the Role of the College and University Relations Recruiter,” and we share his takeaways here.   (more…)

Posted March 09, 2018 by

Skills training for entry-level employees: Hard and soft skill bootcamps

There is a disconnect between employers and younger employees about the skills which are important in the workplace.

As far as I can tell, managers have almost always been, on average, older than their employees and those managers have almost always fretted about the lack of skills those employees bring to the workplace, especially younger employees. This isn’t a millennial phenomenon but an age-old generational phenomenon.

For a while now, I have noodled on why so many employers spend so much time and energy complaining about young adults and their lack of workplace-related skills. These employers want to pay these people entry-level wages, and yet they seem to forget that means that their employees will have entry-level skills. But maybe they don’t need to. Maybe the employees can have better skills before they report to their hiring managers. (more…)

Posted March 07, 2018 by

How to measure the quality of new hires

focus on quality of hireOver the past couple of years, we’ve seen a huge shift in thought amongst our Fortune 1,000 company and federal government agency customers regarding how they measure the quality of their new hires. Until a few years ago, talent acquisition in these organizations hardly measured the quality of hire at all and often not at all. Their focus, if they were data-oriented, was on cost-per-hire.
Today, there’s a shift to looking at productivity and that almost always includes longevity as a key component. If someone is only with you for a year or two, it will be hard for them to be as productive over their career with your organization as someone who is with you for five to ten years. The result? More and more large employers are placing greater and greater emphasis on hiring candidates who on paper may not be as sexy as others, but who are more likely to stay for far longer than those who attended fancier schools.