• How do I find a great, paid internship?

    November 07, 2018 by

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And a great stepping stone to a great career is often a great internship. But students are often frustrated by how to find an internship and, when they do find one of interest, how to apply, get interviewed, and get hired.

    If you try to do everything all at once, it can be overwhelming. I like to break the process down into manageable, bite-sized pieces.

    1. Don’t procrastinate. To use another cliche, early bird gets the worm. While I trust that you’d rather land a great internship than a great worm, the cliche is too well known and understood for me to pass up. Some internships, particularly those with non-profits and governmental agencies, have strict and sometimes very early deadlines. Looking for next summer? You might need to apply in November. As of the writing of this blog article on November 5, 2018, College Recruiter already had 1,795 internships advertised on its site and it is still a couple of months from January when employers start to get aggressive with advertising their internship opportunities.
    2. Complete your CIV analysis. What’s a CIV, you ask? Competencies, interests, and values. Grab a piece of paper and draw two lines down it to divide the paper into three columns. Write competencies at the top of the first column, interests at the top of the second, and values at the top of the third. Now, under competencies, write down everything that other people would say you’re good at. In the second column, write down everything that you find to be interesting, In the third column, write down everything that you care about. Now look for themes. What are you good at that also interests you and which you care about? Those themes are where you should focus your career search.
    3. Network. Many and probably most people think that networking is all about asking other for help. Wrong. It is about asking them how you can help them. That will build good karma and inevitably you’ll find that some — not all — will reciprocate by asking how they can help you. Take them up on the offer. Tell them about your CIV, where you want your career to start, and ask them for the names of two people you should talk with. Keep repeating that. After a few rounds of people referring you to people who refer you to people, you’ll likely run across someone who will decline to give you the two names, not because they’re a jerk but because they want to hire you. Bingo.
    4. Job search sites. Almost every college career service office has a career website, but the vast majority of jobs which are of interest to students and recent graduates are never posted to those sites. Why? Most employers don’t know about them and they can be hard and time consuming to use. So, use those sites but don’t stop there. Also use job search sites like College Recruiter, which typically has about a million part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs advertised on its site. Did I tell you that College Recruiter already has 1,795 internships advertised on its site? Oh, yeah, I did. Did you search them yet?
    5. Attend career fairs. Quite frankly, I’m not a huge fan because the expectations of the employers are often poorly aligned with those of the students. Employer representatives typically attend career fairs because they’re coerced by their bosses, their career service office partners, or both. Their disinterest shows, and they make it worse by refusing to accept paper resumes and telling you to go to their career sites if you want to apply. You could have done that from home, right? But they’re great places to network (see #3) and learn what it is really like to work for a company if you happen to run across a representative who likes to talk and maybe isn’t as discrete as they should be.
    6. Search and apply to jobs. Seems kind of obvious, right? But you’d be amazed at how many candidates don’t apply to enough jobs, apply to the wrong ones, or do a terrible job of applying the ones they are qualified for. If you’re an elite student at an elite school or otherwise have some exceptional qualities, aim high by applying to the most sought-after internships, such as 20 top internships listed below. For everyone else, and that’s almost everyone, the hard truth is that you’re just going to have to try harder. But, if it helps, remember the joke about what you call a doctor who graduates at the bottom of their class from a third-rate medical school. The answer is doctor. Most employers for most jobs feel the same way about interns and new grads. They care far more that you went to college than your major. They care far more about your major than your school. And they care far more about your school than your grades or whether you had a sexy internship or just successfully completed an internship, preferably for them.
    7. Create a job. Whether it’s a gig employment opportunity driving folks around or doing their grocery shopping for them or starting a small business in college like I did, don’t discount this option. But if you find yourself uttering, “I just need a good idea”, move on. The good idea is the least of your problems. Executing that good idea is FAR harder and FAR less exciting.
    8. Get experience. The entire point of an internship program for the employer is to convert those interns into permanent hires upon graduation. If they don’t, their internship program is a failure. Similarly, the entire point of interning is to get an offer to become a permanent employee upon graduation and then to accept that offer. If you don’t, your internship was a failure. Well, maybe not a complete failure, but not as much of a success as it should have been.

    So, back to the top internship programs. What are they? I thought you’d never ask:

    1. Google
    2. Apple
    3. Microsoft
    4. Tesla
    5. Facebook
    6. Goldman Sachs
    7. Amazon
    8. J.P. Morgan
    9. SpaceX
    10. The Walt Disney Company
    11. Nike
    12. Morgan Stanley
    13. IBM
    14. Deloitte
    15. Berkshire Hathaway
    16. Intel
    17. ESPN
    18. Mercedes-Benz
    19. The Boston Consulting Group
    20. Spotify

    — Source: Vault

     

     

  • Age discrimination: Over 40 and interviewing

    August 24, 2018 by

     

    Let’s talk about the issues that 40+ year olds are facing in the job market today. Almost 20% of all college and university students — about four million — are over the age of 35. So why do we automatically think of a bunch of 20 something’s when we hear “recent graduates”? This is also often the image that comes to mind for talent acquisition teams and is used to discriminate against older candidates. Jo Weech, Founder and Principal Consultant at Exemplary Consultants, explains the major problems that this misconception creates.

    Exemplary Consultants provides business management consulting to small businesses and start-ups. Weech got involved in the process because she truly believes that work can be better for every person on the planet. She published an article back in July that got a ton of traffic, likes, and comments. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, had a conversation with her about some of her experiences, where the article came from, and some of the lessons that came from it. The lessons learned are not only useful for job seekers, but for those in talent acquisition as well. Continue Reading

  • Understanding the advantages of the gig economy

    August 16, 2018 by

     

    The workforce has been evolving due to the integration of technology in our society today. “Sometimes all you need is a cell phone and a laptop and you can do many kinds of work remotely,” states Jo Weech, CEO and Principal Consultant of Exemplary Consultants. Weech provides business management consulting to small businesses and start-ups. Here, she offers insight into what the gig economy is and how students and recent graduates can take advantage of the opportunities that come along with it.

    Continue Reading

  • Wrapping up your summer internship: Reflect and connect the dots

    August 06, 2018 by

     

    The summer is winding down and coming to an end, this means many students will wrap up their internships and head back to the classroom. Whether your internship was an outstanding experience or a complete disaster, there is a lot of important reflection to be done. Pam Baker, the founder of Journeous, has dedicated her career to helping young adults choreograph meaningful careers and become focused leaders. Baker accomplishes this by working with individuals to help them find the intersection between their values, interests, and strengths. Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager at Intel, is passionate about helping job seekers at all levels with resumes, interviewing, career planning, and networking. Below we will dive into the most important things to do nearing the end of a summer internship. Continue Reading

  • [white paper] Skills gap? A deeper look at your job ads can help identify more qualified candidates

    July 26, 2018 by

     

    Our latest white paper is specifically for recruiting and talent acquisition leaders who are struggling to attract enough qualified candidates. We teamed up with LiveCareer and combed through their recent 2018 Skills Gap Report. Our hope is that the tips here help you revise your job ads with a fresh lens, and ultimately help you land more of the right candidates faster. Continue Reading

  • [Guide] Get your resume past the machines and land a job you love

    June 14, 2018 by

     

    Applying for jobs can be incredibly frustrating. Does this sound familiar: you’ve submitted your resume online for dozens (hundreds?) of jobs and no one has called for an interview. You have decent experience and a college education but you’re not getting anywhere. Not finding the right job is negatively affecting every aspect of your life.

    One of the most common frustrations for job seekers is getting past the applicant tracking machines (ATS) in their job search. An ATS is a machine that scans your resume before a human even lays eyes on it. We teamed up with Intry to create a guide to navigating ATS’s so you can get your resume past the machines and land a job you love.

    Read the Guide:

    Get Your Resume Past the Machines and Land a Job Your Love

    At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent grad deserves a great career, and we also believe you deserve a high-quality job search experience. Our friends at Intry feel wholeheartedly that everyone deserves to be happy in their jobs. We combined our own expertise of what helps entry-level candidates stand out, with Intry’s deep knowledge of how ATS filters are blocking your resume.

    In the guide we describe eight steps you can take:

    1. How to focus your job search
    2. Doing self-reflection to become more aware of where you fit
    3. Networking
    4. One-click applications–beware!
    5. Staying employed at your day job
    6. Tailoring your resume for each job application
    7. How font and format matter
    8. Managing your emotions

    Tips for navigating ATS in your job searchRead the guide: Get Your Resume Past the Machines and Land a Job You Love

     

     

     

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  • Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Students and Grads

    February 28, 2018 by

     

    We have eleven resume tips to help students and grads write a professional resume that not only gets past the machines and attracts the eye of a recruiter, but stands out against other job seekers. Our Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Entry Level dive into these tips:

    1. Be specific about yourself. A big mistake you can make is to describe yourself generically
    2. The right format. Take advantage especially of the top half of your resume.
    3. Getting past the machines that scan your resume. Don’t assume a pdf is okay, and don’t try any tricks.
    4. Tips for women. You might be surprised at the research.
    5. Tailoring your resume. Another big mistake is to submit the same resume for many jobs.
    6. Tips for veterans. Learn how to market your military experience.
    7. Video resumes. When and how should you use them?
    8. Tips for engineers. We got some good tips from a recruiter at Intel.
    9. Proofread. Proofread, proofread.
    10. Following up after submitting the resume. You’re not done after you hit “apply”.
    11. Resumes for your second job out of college. Learn tips for what to change on your resume.

    Read the Definitive Guide to Resume Writing for Students and Grads

    Get your dream job by following these resume tips

  • College Recruiter is a featured presenter in the Grad CareerFestival designed to help unemployed grads land jobs quicker

    July 10, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (July 10, 2017)–Grad Career/Festival is scheduled for July 27th– July 29th from 11 am – 10 pm daily (EDT). This event seeks to help college grads land a job 2.4 months more quickly! 33 hours of career advice!

    It takes over 7 months for average grad to find employment

    With nearly two million students graduating from college in May and June, it’s not surprising that it will take the average graduate 7.4 months to find employment.   While some of that time is a result of the economy not being able to absorb so many graduates at one time, much of it is a result of the fact that unemployed graduates simply do not simply how to look for a job.

    According to Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “Research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers has shown nearly 62 percent of graduating seniors either NEVER go to the career center, or will only visit once or twice.  It’s no wonder then that the average grad thinks the proper way to look for a job is to load their resume onto 100 websites and wait for someone to contact them!   We know, given the right knowledge and skills we can help an unemployed graduate find a job quicker.”

    Each author is offering three tips based on their niche area of expertise.  Graduates will learn relevant, contemporary strategies to create an elevator pitch, build their online brand, use social media to land a job, as well as learn traditional networking, resume, interviewing, and job search techniques.  Authors will share the importance of creating a career plan, managing their career, and staying current on job search strategies.   The authors will follow the TED Talk recommended presentation length which will provide graduates additional time to pose questions to authors.

    Event gives grads tools to improve resumes and skills in interviewing, networking and job search

    During each author’s presentation, time has been set aside to introduce graduates to innovative online career tools designed to improve their resumes, as well as their interviewing, networking and job search skills.  According to Rothberg, “Our firm and staff are concerned that college graduates are not receiving the knowledge and skills they will need for the dozen job searches they are expected to have by the time they turn 38 years old.   We are excited about the possibilities of putting thousands of dollars in the pockets of graduates by giving them simple insights on how they can not only find a job quicker, but help them launch and lead successful careers!”

    The cost to participate is only $33, but free to anyone who uses the authors promotion code of — CT –. Participation is limited!

    About Grad CareerFestival

    The Grad CareerFestival is produced by TalentMarks, a nationally recognized firm that provides scalable career and professional development programming to career centers, and alumni associations.   http://www.gradcareerfestival.com

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Each year, we help almost three million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities find seasonal, part-time, internship, and other entry-level jobs. College Recruiter is free to candidates as employers pay to advertise their job openings with us. At any given time, we have about 300,000 job postings and well over 40,000 pages of articles, blogs, videos, and other career-related content.  

    For details and interviews, contact phyllis@talentmarks.com   800-849-1762 x 205

  • Writing an engineering resume: Tips from Intel for female students and grads [video]

    June 08, 2017 by

     

    How are you supposed to stand apart from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice for preparing an engineering resume, specifically for female students and grads who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 1 of our conversation. Next time we check in, Jeff will share tips for preparing for an engineering interview. Continue Reading

  • 8 resume writing tips for that second job search out of college

    May 30, 2017 by

    If you’re in an entry-level job and want resume writing tips for your next job, read on.

    The resume format that you used for that first job out of college is going to vary greatly for your second job. It’s not about what you did in college anymore, it’s about what you did in that first job. More specifically – it’s about results, achievements, development, and growth. And directed specifically for each job.

    We asked several experts who weighed in with their resume writing tips: Continue Reading