ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

(more…)

Posted February 07, 2019 by

How AI Can Better Our Education, Careers, and Businesses

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

University relations, talent acquisition, and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit, and government organizations gathered on on Monday, December 10, 2018 at Google for a highly interactive, collegial, and informative day of learning. It was goal of the organizer, College Recruiter, that the hundreds who attended either in person or via livestream left with a roadmap for how they and their organizations could not only survive, but also thrive by using AI to enhance their existing talent acquisition tactics and strategies.

This video captures the opening keynote and related panel discussion at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google. (more…)

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Why should I use a job board to recruit students and recent graduates?

 

A potential customer of College Recruiter just asked a great question of our sales team. We’re trying to convince them to advertise their internships on our job search site as we know from experience that we will deliver an excellent return on investment to them. Quite simply, their profile is a perfect fit: Fortune 1,000 employer with thousands of employees and they hire hundreds of students and recent graduates a year.

So, what’s the problem? As a good, potential customer does, they communicated their key concern or, as a salesperson would call it, objection. The customer, through their advertising agency, said that they don’t advertise their internship roles because they hire all of them through on-campus, career fairs. Our response:

(more…)

Posted January 21, 2019 by

Is matching technology the silver bullet that employers (and some vendors) want it to be?

Merriam-Webster defines a “silver bullet” as something that acts as a magical weapon, especially if it instantly solves a long-standing problem. Sounds to me like the promises that a lot of vendors make to potential customers, including promises made by some HR tech vendors to employers. 

A recent episode of The Chad & Cheese Podcast (note the capitalized The, as in The Ohio State University, but I digress) caused me to ruminate about this subject, and if there’s one thing about rumination that I don’t like, is that it often ends up as vomit. The guest was the bright and likeable Claire McTaggart, chief executive officer of SquarePeg. During the episode, Claire described her company’s mission, product, customers, pricing, and value proposition and then the hosts, Joel Cheesman and Chad Sowash, passed judgment. In short, they liked her but not her business model. There were a number of aspects of her business to like but also some deal killers, chief among them the reliance on matching technology. Joel listed examples of sites which had claimed to have superb matching technology but essentially no longer exist including JobFox, Jobster, and Climber. What the hosts did not take the time to dive into, nor was that episode the appropriate time to do so, was why none of these sites have been able to make matching technology work and why that may be an impossible task, at least for certain roles.

(more…)

Posted January 10, 2019 by

The Do’s and Don’ts of Hiring Part-Time, Temporary and Seasonal Workers

 

Whether a company needs seasonal workers to handle summer tourism, part-time help to meet increased demand during the holidays, or temporary employees to cover a short-term vacancy, acquiring additional support can be both a blessing and a curse. Part-time, temporary and seasonal employees can alleviate stress on full-time employees, improve productivity and keep customers satisfied. However, these hires can also be a headache for companies due to additional liabilities for payroll and HR departments – and if not handled correctly, can negatively impact your company. How can you make this process more productive than painful?

UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCES

The first issue to consider is the proper classification of employees. There are requirements under the law on how different types of employees should be treated, so it’s important to understand how each employment status is defined.

Part-time Employees – Most states define part-time employees as those who work less than 35 hours per week, compared to full-time employees who typically work at least 40 hours per week. Part-time employees are usually paid on an hourly basis. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), part-time employees are treated the same as full-time employees when it comes to minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor. They are also covered under OSHA’s safety and health policies concerning work-related injuries, illnesses and occupational fatalities. Additionally, part-time employees who work 1,000 hours or more during a calendar year may be eligible for retirement benefits under the Employee Retirement Security Act (ERISA).

While part-time employees must comply with company rules and policies, they generally receive limited or no company benefits, such as health benefits, vacation and sick days, paid holidays and unemployment compensation, among others, unless required by state labor laws and/or individual company policies. In today’s more competitive environment, many companies are extending benefits such as paid sick days and holidays to part-time employees to attract and retain qualified employees.

Temporary Employees – Temporary employees, sometimes referred to as “temps,” are typically hired to cover for absent employees (such as those who are on maternity or disability leave) and temporary vacancies, or to fill gaps in a company’s workforce. Temporary employees may be hired directly or through a temporary staffing agency, in which case the temp is “on lease” with the staffing company and not an employee of the company that uses its services. Temporary agencies typically charge clients 15 to 30% more than the amount of compensation given to the temporary employee, though some temp employees may wish to negotiate their hourly rate.

In some cases, temporary jobs may lead to permanent employment, in which case the agency may charge a fee. More often, companies hire temporary workers for a specific purpose while avoiding the cost of hiring regular employees.

Temporary employees may work full or part-time. Although they are not usually eligible for company benefits, some agencies offer health care and other benefits to their temps.

Depending on the state, temporary employees may have rights regarding federal discrimination and harassment claims, as well as other claims. In some circumstances, temporary employees may claim rights under the Family Medical Leave Act, which provides the right to take a leave of absence while taking care of a child, sick spouse, or elderly parent.

Seasonal Employees – When companies need extra help during a particular time period, such as the holidays, they rely on seasonal employees. Seasonal employees are usually hired on a part-time basis, but some may work full-time.

Like part-time employees, seasonal workers must be treated equally under FLSA regarding minimum wage, overtime, recordkeeping, workplace safety and health policies.

While this provides a general overview of employment status, there are laws concerning employee treatment, benefits, and policies of part-time, temporary, or seasonal employees that vary by each state. Therefore, it’s advisable to check your state’s specific employment laws before making these hires. (add link to DOL – https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/state.htm)

The employer needs to ensure that each employee is classified correctly and placed on the appropriate payroll. It’s important to complete paperwork correctly the first time in order to avoid problems down the road. For example, if you don’t withhold the correct amount of taxes the company will be responsible for refunding 100% of the owed taxes, plus additional fees and interest on the owed amount. The employer is also responsible for including temporary and seasonal employees’ wages in payroll taxes and filings. Filing correctly will save you from extra paperwork and penalties.

PROVIDE PROPER ONBOARDING AND TRAINING

Let’s begin with the tale of two hospitality companies. Company A views hiring seasonal employees as a necessary evil during the height of their tourist season. They usually wait until the last minute to start the hiring process, and because things are so hectic during this time of year, they scrimp on onboarding and training to save time. The result is high turnover, low productivity and an increase in customer service complaints.

Meanwhile, Company B gears up for the busy season by planning ahead and scooping up the best candidates. They have formal onboarding and training procedures that have been fine-tuned over the years with feedback from seasonal employees and their managers. These hires do not start working in any capacity, especially interacting with customers, before finishing the required training course. The result is low turnover, higher productivity, repeat hires that reduces recruitment efforts and time bringing them up to speed, and satisfied customers.

The moral of these stories is that part-time, temporary or seasonal employees deserve the same level of commitment and training as full-time employees. After all, you never know when one of these hires will become a full-time member of your team. Even if that never happens, these employees can have a big impact on your business in terms of productivity, culture, customer service and company reputation.

Employers can set them up for success with an onboarding process that includes:

  • A full orientation that covers all company policies and procedures, as well as your expectations regarding their performance and accountability.
  • Training that provides the knowledge an employee needs to do a good job and make valuable contributions. Training should also encompass any safety issues that apply to the position.
  • Matching the new hire with a peer buddy, who can help them build a social network, encourage open dialogue and help with questions/issues in a timely manner. Having a buddy to keep a close eye on a new hire can also head off potential problems before they occur.
  • Regular check-ins with a manager/supervisor.
  • A formal introduction to the entire team, when possible.

If part-time, temporary or seasonal workers do not feel like part of the team or become frustrated by the lack of knowledge and necessary tools to get the job done, it’s highly likely they will leave after a few days, putting you back to square one. During their short tenure with your company, they may cause more harm than good by interacting negatively with other employees and/or customers. Finally, in today’s world of social media, dissatisfied hires can tarnish your company’s reputation with a single scathing tweet.
 

Top 5 Reasons Seasonal and Temporary Employees Quit

While full-time employees typically cite reasons such as “lack of opportunity for advancement” or “a poor relationship with my boss” for leaving a company, seasonal hires and temps aren’t with a company long enough for these issues to come into play. With these employees, the most common reasons for quitting a job (usually after a very short time period) are:

  1. I don’t understand what I need to do (lack of training).
  2. There is no one available to help me or answer questions (lack of supervision).
  3. The work is boring or meaningless.
  4. The pay is not worth the amount of work required.
  5. I found a better job.

IMMERSE HIRES IN YOUR COMPANY CULTURE

Company culture can not only help you retain talented full-time employees, but also attract and keep part-time, temporary and seasonal hires. Numerous studies show that employees at every level become more invested and engaged with a company when there is a positive culture. What exactly does this mean? Culture can be defined as “a blend of the values, beliefs, taboos, symbols, rituals and myths all companies develop over time.”

In other words, culture is the company’s personality. It might include the company’s mission, expectations, work environment, management style and community involvement. No matter how you define it, there is a strong link between culture and employee turnover, which affects productivity and success.

A Columbia University study shows that the likelihood of job turnover at an organization with a rich company culture is just 13.9 percent, compared to 48.4 percent in companies with poor cultures. The reason for this is simple: unhappy employees don’t tend to do more than the minimum, great workers who don’t feel appreciated quit, and poor managers negatively affect workers and productivity.

In his Harvard Business Review blog post, “Transform Your Employees Into Passionate Advocates,” Rob Markey states: “Loyal, passionate employees bring a company as much benefit as loyal, passionate customers. They stay longer, work harder, work more creatively and find ways to go the extra mile. They bring you more great employees. And that spreads even more happiness for employees, for customers and for shareholders.”

In fact, it literally pays to keep employees happy! The Department of Economics at the University of Warwick found that happy workers are 12 percent more productive than the average worker and unhappy workers are 10 percent less productive.

Therefore, it’s important to make sure all employees, including part-time, temporary and seasonal hires, are happy and engaged by immersing them into your company’s culture. A positive company culture can also help you with your recruiting efforts by making you stand out from the crowd.

AVOID COMMON MISTAKES

One of the most frequent mistakes companies make when hiring seasonal employees is waiting too long to begin the recruitment process. Ideally, you want to make sure there is adequate staff in place before a busy period starts or a temporary vacancy begins. This gives the company time to onboard and train employees properly. Don’t assume that you’ll be able to fill positions quickly, even if you’ve had success in past years. It’s best to have a detailed plan in place that includes when the process will start, as well as where and how you’ll recruit – which brings us to another common mistake…

Don’t rely solely on one or two recruiting methods. This limits the quality and diversity of your applicant pool and could increase the time it takes to fill positions. Consider recruitment methods that target your “ideal applicants,” such as college students. Try cultivating relationships with local universities so they feel inclined to refer top candidates. Also, remember that employee referrals are the gold standard! Ask people in your organization if they know anyone who may be interested.

Finally, avoid relaxing your hiring standards for seasonal or temporary employees. While their tenure may be short, the impact they have your company can be lasting. Employ the same methods you use to ensure a great full-time hire, including a well-written job description, careful review of applications and/or resumes, thorough interviews, references and background checks. Think of this extra effort as an investment in your company and its future.

THINK LONG-TERM

Speaking of the future, hiring quality workers for a temporary vacancy or busy season can give you a pool of qualified candidates to call upon when you need them. Similarly, hiring talented part-time employees increases the likelihood of them becoming valuable full-time team members when the need arises. In fact, companies can reduce the costs and efforts of recruiting by encouraging good seasonal or temp workers to return during the following season or the next time a vacancy needs to be filled. To ensure that employees leave on a positive note, don’t forget to:

Provide feedback – Like regular employees, part-timers, temps and seasonal hires need regular feedback. You may also want to consider offering incentives, such as a small bonus or pay raise for employees who exceed expectations.

Conduct an exit interview – Just because an employee is only with you for a short time doesn’t mean he or she can’t provide valuable insights. Exit interviews give you a chance to learn about potential problems and fix them or reinforce positive policies and procedures. Exit interviews can also help avoid a negative review about your company: If an employee had a bad experience, allowing them to “be heard” may negate their desire to vent their frustration online.

Some questions to consider include:

  1. What did you like most and least about your job?
  2. What would you change about your job, your team or the company as a whole?
  3. Were you trained properly and given the direction you needed to do your job?
  4. Were you comfortable talking to your manager or supervisor about issues?
  5. Did you feel like a valued part of the team/company?
  6. Would you recommend the company to a friend looking for a job? If not, why?

From proper planning and recruiting efforts, to thoughtful onboarding, training and management, it pays to devote the time and resources to finding and retaining quality part-time, temporary and seasonal employees. These folks can have a positive impact on your company’s performance, culture and reputation, both now and in the future.
 

Sources:

“Guidelines for Hiring Part Time, Seasonal and Temporary Employees,” Optimum HRIS.
“It Really Pays to Have a Rich Company Culture,” Entrepreneur, 2016.
“Part time, temporary, and seasonal employees,” FindLaw, 2018.
“The Importance of Seasonal Exit Interviews,” by Christin Nein, Coal March Productions, 2017.
The U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, 2018.

 

Posted January 09, 2019 by

Identifying talent through internships and co-ops ranked as most important by employers of students and recent grads

A pretty common question that we get at College Recruiter is, “What do employers care about?” Sometimes, candidates are asking because they want to know how they can become better qualified or better communication their existing skillset. And sometimes we’re asked by other employers who are considering creating or improving their college and university relations programs.

A recent survey of employer members of the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicated that those mostly large employers are most concerned with their early identification of candidates and their branding efforts. “Identifying talent early through internships and co-ops was rated the highest, with 94.9 percent of respondents indicating it is “very” or “extremely” important. Trailing slightly was branding their organization to campuses, as 90.2 percent indicated it is “very” or “extremely” important. Other factors of high importance were diversity (87.4 percent) and measuring the results of their university relations and recruiting program (83.5 percent).”

(more…)

Posted December 13, 2018 by

Video, slides, and recap of College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google

 

Wow, did we ever receive great feedback from Monday’s College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google. I thought I should share some highlights:

  • All 200 available tickets sold-out almost a week ahead of the event thanks, in part, to promotional efforts by the Association of Talent Acquisition Professionals, CareerXroads, Recruiting Brainfood, and Jibe.
  • A handful let us know that they couldn’t attend. We gave their tickets to people on the waitlist.
  • Attendees at the Sunday evening reception, sponsored by TalentNet Inc., enjoyed crab, steak, grilled vegetables, adult beverages, and more than a few laughs.
  • Whitney Selfridge, Google’s Product Marketing Manager, and Faith Rothberg, College Recruiter’s Chief Executive Officer, warmly welcomed the hundreds who attended in-person and via the live stream, which was sponsored by AllyO.
  • I delivered an overview of how AI is already being used in the recruitment industry.
  • Tarquin Clark, Director of Partnerships and Go To Market for Google’s Cloud Talent Solutions, delivered the opening keynote on how AI can better our education, businesses, and careers. He then moderated a panel discussion featuring Roopesh Nair, President and Chief Executive Officer of Symphony Talent; Jayne Kettles, Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer for gr8 People; Joe Essenfeld, Chief Executive Officer and Founder of Jibe; and Justin Lumby, Vice President of Technology Strategy for TalentNet Inc.
  • Alexandra Levit of PeopleResults and author of Humanity Works delivered the featured presentation on how technology and people will merge in future workforces. She then moderated a panel discussion featuring Jennifer Sethre, CEO and Founder of Intry; Wahab Owolabi, Recruiting Manager for Rubrik; Jared Bazzell, Talent Acquisition Manager – Campus for CDW; and Doug Berg, Founder of ZAPinfo. Thanks to ZAPinfo, 100 attendees received a copy of Alexandra’s excellent, new book.
  • After a delicious lunch sponsored by our partner, Google, we were treated to the closing keynote by John Sumser of HR Examiner on AI, the algorithms, and who owns the outcomes. He then moderated a spirited discussion with panelists Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel; Derek Zeller, Director of Recruiting Solutions and Channels for ENGAGE Talent; Richard Rosenow, Workforce Planning Analyst for Facebook; and Heather Bussing of the Law Offices of Heather Bussing.

(more…)

Posted December 03, 2018 by

Interview by Peter Clayton of Total Picture about the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google on Mon 12/10/2018

 

One of my favorite people in the recruitment industry is Peter Clayton of TotalPicture Media. Without a doubt, he is the most knowledge and capable videographer in the industry. When I hear that he’s involved in a project, I know that the project will go well.

Peter and I recently sat down…about 1,266 miles apart, to discuss next Monday’s College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google. Over the past decade, College Recruiter has organized 16 of these one-day conferences for talent acquisition and human resource leaders. All have essentially broken even, none have lost much money, and none have made much money. And that’s the way we planned them. We wanted to do something that would enable us to give back to the recruiting industry and a no-pitch, educational conference that moves around the country seemed like a great idea as there is a tremendous amount of turnover in talent acquisition and human resources, especially amongst those whose primary focus is the recruitment of people early in their careers, including college and university relations recruitment leaders. (more…)

Posted November 07, 2018 by

How do I find a great, paid internship?

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And a great stepping stone to a great career is often a great internship. But students are often frustrated by how to find an internship and, when they do find one of interest, how to apply, get interviewed, and get hired.

If you try to do everything all at once, it can be overwhelming. I like to break the process down into manageable, bite-sized pieces.

  1. Don’t procrastinate. To use another cliche, early bird gets the worm. While I trust that you’d rather land a great internship than a great worm, the cliche is too well known and understood for me to pass up. Some internships, particularly those with non-profits and governmental agencies, have strict and sometimes very early deadlines. Looking for next summer? You might need to apply in November. As of the writing of this blog article on November 5, 2018, College Recruiter already had 1,795 internships advertised on its site and it is still a couple of months from January when employers start to get aggressive with advertising their internship opportunities.
  2. Complete your CIV analysis. What’s a CIV, you ask? Competencies, interests, and values. Grab a piece of paper and draw two lines down it to divide the paper into three columns. Write competencies at the top of the first column, interests at the top of the second, and values at the top of the third. Now, under competencies, write down everything that other people would say you’re good at. In the second column, write down everything that you find to be interesting, In the third column, write down everything that you care about. Now look for themes. What are you good at that also interests you and which you care about? Those themes are where you should focus your career search.
  3. Network. Many and probably most people think that networking is all about asking other for help. Wrong. It is about asking them how you can help them. That will build good karma and inevitably you’ll find that some — not all — will reciprocate by asking how they can help you. Take them up on the offer. Tell them about your CIV, where you want your career to start, and ask them for the names of two people you should talk with. Keep repeating that. After a few rounds of people referring you to people who refer you to people, you’ll likely run across someone who will decline to give you the two names, not because they’re a jerk but because they want to hire you. Bingo.
  4. Job search sites. Almost every college career service office has a career website, but the vast majority of jobs which are of interest to students and recent graduates are never posted to those sites. Why? Most employers don’t know about them and they can be hard and time consuming to use. So, use those sites but don’t stop there. Also use job search sites like College Recruiter, which typically has about a million part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs advertised on its site. Did I tell you that College Recruiter already has 1,795 internships advertised on its site? Oh, yeah, I did. Did you search them yet?
  5. Attend career fairs. Quite frankly, I’m not a huge fan because the expectations of the employers are often poorly aligned with those of the students. Employer representatives typically attend career fairs because they’re coerced by their bosses, their career service office partners, or both. Their disinterest shows, and they make it worse by refusing to accept paper resumes and telling you to go to their career sites if you want to apply. You could have done that from home, right? But they’re great places to network (see #3) and learn what it is really like to work for a company if you happen to run across a representative who likes to talk and maybe isn’t as discrete as they should be.
  6. Search and apply to jobs. Seems kind of obvious, right? But you’d be amazed at how many candidates don’t apply to enough jobs, apply to the wrong ones, or do a terrible job of applying the ones they are qualified for. If you’re an elite student at an elite school or otherwise have some exceptional qualities, aim high by applying to the most sought-after internships, such as 20 top internships listed below. For everyone else, and that’s almost everyone, the hard truth is that you’re just going to have to try harder. But, if it helps, remember the joke about what you call a doctor who graduates at the bottom of their class from a third-rate medical school. The answer is doctor. Most employers for most jobs feel the same way about interns and new grads. They care far more that you went to college than your major. They care far more about your major than your school. And they care far more about your school than your grades or whether you had a sexy internship or just successfully completed an internship, preferably for them.
  7. Create a job. Whether it’s a gig employment opportunity driving folks around or doing their grocery shopping for them or starting a small business in college like I did, don’t discount this option. But if you find yourself uttering, “I just need a good idea”, move on. The good idea is the least of your problems. Executing that good idea is FAR harder and FAR less exciting.
  8. Get experience. The entire point of an internship program for the employer is to convert those interns into permanent hires upon graduation. If they don’t, their internship program is a failure. Similarly, the entire point of interning is to get an offer to become a permanent employee upon graduation and then to accept that offer. If you don’t, your internship was a failure. Well, maybe not a complete failure, but not as much of a success as it should have been.

So, back to the top internship programs. What are they? I thought you’d never ask:

1. Google
2. Apple
3. Microsoft
4. Tesla
5. Facebook
6. Goldman Sachs
7. Amazon
8. J.P. Morgan
9. SpaceX
10. The Walt Disney Company
11. Nike
12. Morgan Stanley
13. IBM
14. Deloitte
15. Berkshire Hathaway
16. Intel
17. ESPN
18. Mercedes-Benz
19. The Boston Consulting Group
20. Spotify

— Source: Vault

 

 

Posted November 05, 2018 by

From internship to full-fledged career: how one Fortune 500 company is recruiting from within

 

Author: Kate-Madonna Hindes

Investing in entry-level workers creates greater job stability and more opportunities for advancement for employees, contributing to a more economically vibrant society.(Rockefeller Foundation)

Every single day, new relationships are forming, and interns are turning into full-time employees. Across thousands of different companies, H.R. and recruiting departments are making long-term investments for maximum growth and profitability. Smart companies are taking note while searching for interns to see if they have the qualities they are looking for in full-time employees.

(more…)