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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 13, 2016 by

4 secrets to job search success

Erin Vickers

Erin Vickers, Staffing Consultant, RightSourcing, Inc.

It’s tough to begin searching for your first full-time job as a college student, having worked as an intern, volunteer, or in part-time positions in the past. Transitioning to full-time job status is huge, and the interim evolutionary phase feels odd at times and requires some changes on your part.

Expert staffing consulting Erin Vickers offers 4 helpful tips to ease the transition and aid the job search process.

Establish your brand and keep it professional.

Make sure you are reflecting your professional self. Search for your name online and see what comes back in the results. After all, you are selling yourself to potential employers, and you should present your best self. Keep your social media pages (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.) free from questionable posts and images.

Create a professional email address if you do not already have one. Email addresses are free and easy to establish so there’s no excuse for not having one for professional interaction. Employers don’t want to message “foxymama@thisemail.com” or “hotdaddy@thatemail.com.”

Remove questionable greetings, ringtones, ringback tones, etc., from your phone. Choose a standard voicemail greeting stating your full name, requesting callers to leave a message.

Do not be a no call, no show to an interview whether it’s over the phone or in person. Period.

Employers understand that other opportunities present themselves and are not offended (though maybe disappointed) when they hear “no” for whatever reason. Politely call or email your contact to let the company know you will not be attending the previously scheduled interview. You do not need to go into great detail about why you are canceling your appointment, but you do need to let your interviewer know you will not be there and thank them for their time and consideration.

Remember the STAR or PAR acronym while giving answers in an interview.

STAR stands for Situation/Task, Action, Result, while PAR stands for Problem, Action, Result. Many interviewers will ask you to “tell them about a time when….”  By integrating the STAR/PAR acronyms, you will be able to respond with a complete answer: you should describe a situation, task, or problem you faced, detail the action you took when resolving it, and then tell what resulted from your actions.

Use and grow your network

Andresr/Shutterstock.com

Andresr/Shutterstock.com

You want to do X.  You know or know of someone who does X.  Make the connection and see what transpires. Perhaps the connection will lead to a job, but it could also potentially become a mentor/mentee relationship that will assist with career guidance in your quest for a job or better job.  Also, having a LinkedIn profile connects you to a world of people with roles similar to the one you are probably seeking. Send a terse yet somewhat personal message to those with whom you want to connect: e.g. Hi ___, Looks like we have this person, group, skill, etc. in common.  I’d like to connect with you.

Want more secrets to connecting the dots on your path to career success? Follow College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter or start searching for jobs on our website today.

Erin Vickers, Staffing Consultant at RightSourcing, Inc., has spent more than 16 years in various recruiting roles in a variety of industries. Her experience includes full-lifecycle recruiting for nationally-known telecommunications carriers and a third-party administrator. Additionally, she has supported several staffing initiatives for an international chemical company and a widely-renowned insurance company. She has placed candidates in accounting, engineering, executive, financial, marketing, and other professional positions as well as various customer service and technician-type roles. As a Staffing Consultant, she has piloted an on-site recruiting program in support of an exclusive client’s needs.  Her passion is to strategically assist her client in operating an efficient organization by providing top talent.  Erin graduated from Lyon College (Batesville, AR) with a Bachelor of Arts degree in French. In her spare time, she enjoys listening to live music, traveling, and spending time with her two spoiled rescue dogs.

 

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted November 05, 2015 by

2015 employment market for recent grads and students

This webinar, 2015 employment market for recent grads and students, addresses the various job markets which impact today’s college and university students and recent graduates, how students and grads find employment, their frustrations, and some ideas for how employers, career services, and other stakeholders can improve the current system.

Today’s webinar features College Recruiter’s President and Founder, Steven Rothberg. The webinar is moderated by former National Account Manager for College Recruiter, Andrea McEwen-Henderson.

Key takeaways:

There is no such thing as the job market for students and recent graduates. There are as many different markets as there are majors, schools, geographic areas, diversity characteristics, and other factors.

The job markets have improved dramatically since the Great Recession, but only a small percentage of recent graduates are employed within their chosen fields within six months of graduation.

The perception amongst many is that almost all graduates find their jobs through their career services offices, but the data shows quite the opposite.

Basic needs such as compensation and job security rank at the top of factors considered by students and recent graduates when evaluating job opportunities, yet few employers disclose compensation, and even fewer provide job security.

There are many ways employers, career services, and other stakeholders can improve the current system.

If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Questions:

  1. I recently read that Ernst & Young is no longer recruiting at college campuses and now doesn’t care about the majors and GPA’s of the students it is interviewing. Is that true?

Ernst & Young is still interviewing on college campuses, but based on research done in the United Kingdom, the company has followed the data and is not going to limit interviews to students from certain majors and with certain GPA’s. This is great news for liberal arts majors and for students whose GPA’s fall just below the old GPA cut-off.

  1. Most employers do not have the resources to wine­-and­-dine career services, professors, and college administrators and to spend days on-campus interviewing potential interns. What are some options available to them?

If it’s June or July, set up an appointment with the career services director and diligently follow her directions. Employers often look for shortcuts in college recruiting, but there are none. It is a strategic process. You have to invest properly. If you’re running behind, use a niche job board like College Recruiter, or host an unconventional recruiting event and invite candidates via social media.

  1. There’s a debate within our company about whether we should ramp up our efforts to hire military veterans or continue to focus on hiring students and recent graduates. Which do you think is a better way to recruit future leaders?

Military and college recruiting efforts are not mutually exclusive, but there are some aspects that do not overlap. For example, many military servicemen and women have gone on to earn college degrees. This is a sweet spot for recruiters, and corporate recruiting efforts can often find candidates who meet both criteria.

  1. My campus used to have 5,000 students, but we’ve grown to 15,000 over the past 10 years. I’m still the only paid staff person in the career service office, although I do have a few students who work part-time. How do I get the budget to hire people so we can actually have time to provide career counseling services to the students?

Growth is wonderful, but lack of budget is a huge challenge to overcome. Make the business case for an increase in budget by looking at the impact you have on alumni giving. If you provide employment opportunities, and your alumni prosper, you should request more funds. Career services should align themselves closely with alumni and development offices.

  1. I keep hearing from politicians that a college education is a waste of money. Is it?

Absolutely not. The unemployment rate for college graduates is two to three times below average. The same politicians who claim that college is unnecessary are relying on their own college degrees to argue these points. We’re in the information age, and if we can’t properly educate our youth, we will be left behind.

 

Steven Rothberg is the president and founder of College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent graduates searching for entry-level jobs and students hunting for internships. Steven founded the company in 1991 as a publisher of campus maps and employment magazines. Steven grew up in Winnipeg, Canada, moved south to Minneapolis for the weather, is married to the CEO of College Recruiter, and has three young kids and the world’s most mellow dog.

 

Posted July 20, 2015 by

Careers in the Foreign Service – One Diplomat’s Story

Becoming a Foreign Service Officer can be extremely challenging but on the other hand is even more rewarding. Ana Escrogima describes her experiences as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer in the Middle East and how the State Department carries out its mission to implement foreign policy objectives. She also describes the efforts of the State Department to recruit diverse and talented candidates for the Foreign and Civil Service.

In this recorded webinar, Andrea McEwen Henderson, National Account Manager for College Recruiter, hosts Ana Escrogima, Diplomat in Residence for the New York Metro Area.

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Posted July 18, 2015 by

Job Seeker Webinar Careers in the Foreign Service – The Exam Process and Student Opportunities

There are great opportunities to become a Foreign and Civil Service officer. The positions are taken very seriously and the application process is very intricate. But there are fellowship and internship opportunities to become involved while still going to graduate school.

Andrea McEwen-Henderson, National Account Manager for College Recruiter, hosts this recorded webinar with Ana Escrogima, Diplomat in Residence for the New York Metro area, who discusses the Foreign Service Exam and the Civil Service hiring process. She also reviews the State Department internship program and various graduate fellowship opportunities.

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Posted July 07, 2015 by

Keywords Are Killing Us – Your Searching Strategy is Missing Top Talent

Searching the sea of candidates to find the best fit is not easy. Many recruiting tools give recruiters options to look up keywords across candidate applications and resumes to narrow the field of possible candidates. However, these keywords may be making matters worse instead of better. The main goal of keywords are to group the candidates that your recruiter wants, more people interested than can fill, puts best candidates first to make it easier for recruiters to find the candidates. Find out why and what you can do to find the best candidates.

In this recorded webinar, Andrea McEwen-Henderson, National Account Manager from College Recruiter and David Sarnowski, Customer Experience Manager from HarQen discusses why keyword searches are problematic, as well as giving options to help you find the best candidates quicker.

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Posted April 22, 2015 by

Best Schools For Employers Who Want to Hire Top Students Now

Minneapolis, MN, April 22, 2015 — College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, announced winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates now.

“There are a lot of awards out there for best colleges,” said Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “but they almost all focus on starting salary, percentage of graduates employed upon graduation, or percentage of graduates employed within their chosen career path upon graduation. There’s nothing wrong with those rankings but they fail to tell the entire picture. They miss schools which are hidden gems because they do an incredibly great job of taking students who may not have been able to get into the most expensive or most prestigious schools but who are hired into the same types of jobs with the same types of companies paying the same types of starting salaries.”

College Recruiter used its custom research product to generate this ranking. Our database includes 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific school. Other common queries include data related to SAT scores, gender, ethnicity, as well as tenure and turnover of employees.

The modeling for this hidden gem school project was to identify the schools which featured high SAT/ACT scores for entering students, high average starting salaries for the regions in which the schools were located, a high percentage of graduates working in their chosen field of study, and a majority of the graduating class available for recruitment by employers. The availability factor distinguishes many of the excellent from the hidden gem schools. An excellent school may have a high percentage of its graduating class already committed to work for other employers or going to graduate school but that is not a school at which most employers will find success in their effort to hire graduates. A hidden gem school, on the other hand, is one at which employers are likely to find high quality candidates who are ready, willing, and able to say yes to an offer of employment.

The winners of the 2015 Hidden Gem Index listed by major are:

About College Recruiter

College Recruiter (https://www.collegerecruiter.com) helps recent grads and students find great careers. College Recruiter is the leading niche job board for college and university grads searching for entry-level jobs and students searching for internships. Our site features hundreds of thousands of entry-level and internship job posting ads as well as tens of thousands of pages of employment-related articles, Ask the Experts questions and answers, blogs, videos, and more. Our clients are mostly federal government and Fortune 1,000 corporations who advertise their job openings using our job postings, targeted email campaigns, targeted mobile banner ads, targeted display ads, and virtual career fairs.

Posted April 21, 2015 by

Top 12 Hidden Gem Colleges for Employers Hiring Biochemistry Majors

Biochemistry Hidden Gem Index AwardMinneapolis, MN, April 21, 2015 — College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, today announced the 12 winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates who majored in bioengineering or biomedical engineering.

“There are a lot of awards out there for best colleges,” said Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “but they almost all focus on starting salary, percentage of graduates employed upon graduation, or percentage of graduates employed within their chosen career path upon graduation. There’s nothing wrong with those rankings but they fail to tell the entire picture. They miss schools which are hidden gems because they do an incredibly great job of taking students who may not have been able to get into the most expensive or most prestigious schools but who are hired into the same types of jobs with the same types of companies paying the same types of starting salaries.”

College Recruiter used its custom research product to generate this ranking. Our database includes 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific school. Other common queries include data related to SAT scores, gender, ethnicity, as well as tenure and turnover of employees. (more…)

Posted April 20, 2015 by

Top 9 Hidden Gem Colleges for Employers Hiring Actuarial Science Majors

Actuarial Science Hidden Gem Index AwardMinneapolis, MN, April 20, 2015 — College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, today announced the 12 winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates who majored in actuarial science.

“There are a lot of awards out there for best colleges,” said Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “but they almost all focus on starting salary, percentage of graduates employed upon graduation, or percentage of graduates employed within their chosen career path upon graduation. There’s nothing wrong with those rankings but they fail to tell the entire picture. They miss schools which are hidden gems because they do an incredibly great job of taking students who may not have been able to get into the most expensive or most prestigious schools but who are hired into the same types of jobs with the same types of companies paying the same types of starting salaries.”

College Recruiter used its custom research product to generate this ranking. Our database includes 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific school. Other common queries include data related to SAT scores, gender, ethnicity, as well as tenure and turnover of employees. (more…)

Posted April 19, 2015 by

Top 12 Hidden Gem Colleges for Employers Hiring Business Majors

Business Hidden Gem Index AwardMinneapolis, MN, April 19, 2015 — College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, today announced the 12 winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates who majored in business.

“There are a lot of awards out there for best colleges,” said Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “but they almost all focus on starting salary, percentage of graduates employed upon graduation, or percentage of graduates employed within their chosen career path upon graduation. There’s nothing wrong with those rankings but they fail to tell the entire picture. They miss schools which are hidden gems because they do an incredibly great job of taking students who may not have been able to get into the most expensive or most prestigious schools but who are hired into the same types of jobs with the same types of companies paying the same types of starting salaries.”

College Recruiter used its custom research product to generate this ranking. Our database includes 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific school. Other common queries include data related to SAT scores, gender, ethnicity, as well as tenure and turnover of employees. (more…)