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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted November 26, 2019 by

What’s the best career advice College Recruiter’s founder wishes he had received early in his career?

Probably the best career advice that I ever received came from Marvin Granath, senior vice president for the Human Resources – Legal office of Honeywell Inc.

Marv was my boss for the last year that I was at Honeywell and he reported to the CEO. What Marv taught me — both verbally and by allowing me to watch him in action — was the importance of building a strong network and using corporate politics not just for his benefit but the company’s. 

Marv planted seeds every hour of every day. He continually looked for ways of creating win-win situations by helping others accomplish their personal and corporate goals. He did so not on a quid pro quo basis but instead knowing that some of his assistance would go unrewarded but some would greatly help him reach his personal and corporate goals. When he needed help, people throughout the company would be eager to do whatever they could, not just because it was their job but because they truly wanted to help him as a tangible way of showing him their appreciation for the help he had provided to them days, weeks, months, or even years earlier and without precondition. 

Marv passed away a decade ago, but he continues to inspire me.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted November 12, 2019 by

Why do so many college grads live with their parents?

The average college grad earns about $46,000 a year. That sounds quite high to most Americans, because it is also the average income earned by most families.

But if you dig into the college grad’s finances, you’ll quickly see that they’re likely to live in poverty. Why? Because the student debt of a graduate from a first or second tier, four-year college or university can easily exceed $100,000 and often approaches $200,000. It is common for tuition to be at least $25,000 and often more than $50,000 a year. Add to that room, board, books, travel to/from the city your family lives in and you’re looking at $40,000 to $65,000 a year. Multiply that by four years and you’re at $160,000 to $220,000 in debt.

If your student loans are payable in 20 years, which is common, and your interest rate is eight percent, which is also common, you’re looking at $2,000 per month for student loan payments. Over 12 months, that’s $24,000.

So, suddenly, that $46,000 a year gives you the earning power of someone making $22,000 a year, which is less than the average, full-time, Uber driver nets.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted October 04, 2019 by

How to convince your boss to let you work from home

All of College Recruiter’s employees work remotely from home-based offices, but that hasn’t always been the case. Before we moved to a fully work-from-home, distributed team model, only some of our employees worked from home. How did we decide who would work from home? Not only did the employee need to want to work from home, but we also needed to see that they had demonstrated an ability to work from home successfully. 

Some of our home-based employees had done so successfully for other employers. Others had not yet had that experience. For those who had not yet tried working from home, we started off by allowing them to work from home occasionally, such as a half a day or a day a week. If that went well, then they might work from home four days a week and be in the office a day a week. If that went well, then they’d start working from home all of the time and only coming into the office when in-person meetings were imperative, such as all-team meetings.

There were employees who wanted to work from home, whose home office seemed well suited to success (not just a desk in their bedroom), and who seemed to have the discipline and self-starter skill set that we found were necessary. Yet they floundered. Sometimes, pilots that everyone expects to succeed instead fail, including employees trying to work from home. 

Why did the work-from-home pilots fail? A variety of reasons, but the primary reason was the lack of a suitable workspace. One employee who had worked from home with great success bought a dog who barked non-stop unless sitting on the lap of our employee, which prevented her from being productive in her customer service job as she needed to be on the phone a lot. Another employee didn’t make childcare arrangements for his three young kids and so they interrupted him multiple times an hour with a variety of requests such as for snacks. 

Home-based employment can be a wonderful thing for both employee and employer, but those who have never worked from home may be surprised at how hard it is to do successfully.

Posted May 10, 2018 by

Young women going into business: You need to hear this advice from EY’s Angela Ciborowski

 

For women who are interested in going into business, there are many fantastic opportunities out there and many challenges as well. We spoke with Angela Ciborowski to discuss how young women can empower themselves to succeed in starting a business career. Ciborowski is an Associate Director at Ernst & Young, where she leads MBA Strategic Programs and advises MBA recruiting.

She is so passionate about empowering women in business that she created the Empower You Graduate Women’s Leadership Conference. This event is designed to lead, inspire and motivate future women leaders. Ciborowski provided some deep and insightful comments that we think will inspire you to move forward in your early career! (more…)

Posted April 10, 2018 by

Attract students and grads with your wellness program, especially financial wellness

 

Wellness programs don’t just reduce costs by increasing the likelihood that your employees show up for work. A holistic and well managed wellness program can also serve as a recruitment tool.

We know healthy employees who balance their work and personal lives are more productive. We know that poor physical, emotional and financial health distract employees while they are working and take them away from work to deal with personal issues. Employers have the opportunity to not only increase productivity but also attract talent by providing holistic wellness services. One important element to attract and support younger talent is a robust financial wellness program. Here we compile the expertise of several experts in wellness programs to help you sort out what will benefit your organization.  (more…)

Posted December 02, 2016 by

Three ideas for finding meaning at your job

1680350Guest writer Jacob Merkley

Work can sometimes be stressful, challenging, or perhaps even downright boring.  For some, it is hard to find reasons to get up in the morning and go to work.  For others, being at work means long hours of doing something you just don’t “love”.

You don’t need to feel depressed about work when you wake up in the mornings, nor do you need to just work to get a paycheck.  No matter how you feel about your current situation, keep these three ideas in mind to find greater meaning and job satisfaction, no matter what it is.

 

Change Your Attitude

If you are comparing your current job to the imaginary one that satisfies everything you ever dreamed of, you may need a change in attitude. When things aren’t perfect, try to keep your cynicism in check. Remember the last time your job made you feel satisfied and empowered.  Embrace moments like these. Be grateful for the job you do have. Many people don’t have a job at all or are underemployed, and might love to be in your spot.

Think Less About Yourself

Sometimes it’s hard to not get caught up in what the job can do for you.  We all need a job.  We need the paycheck. But maybe it is time to consider what you can do for your job or your company. Think about the impact you are making on a daily basis.  Are you helping others? Are you helping your team members or the community?  Are you making a difference somehow? If you prioritize helping others, you might see your immediate environment become more positive and in turn affect your own outlook.

Look Outside Work to Find Meaning

If you really can’t make your work meaningful, then consider other ways that you can find meaning in your life.  (more…)

Recent college grads can develop professional skills that last a lifetime in work and travel jobs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Posted October 31, 2016 by

How traveling abroad after college can help you land your first job [infographic]

 

Are you thinking about traveling abroad after college, but you worry about entering the working world one year later? Don’t worry! In fact, traveling the world will help you acquire some very necessary skills to get your first job. While having fun and exploring new cultures, you will learn things you wouldn’t otherwise. And when you are back from your adventures, you can make travel look good on your resume and in an interview. Here are six ways to take advantage of your traveling experiences and stay on track to launch your career:

1. Take time to reflect

Knowing what you want to do straight after graduation can be quite challenging. Before making this important decision, it may be beneficial to take some time off to travel abroad and analyze the future of your career from a different perspective. Traveling will give you the chance to disconnect from your daily routine and have time for yourself to consider the different options.

2. Volunteer

If you have just finished college, you may not have any working experience yet. But that is not a problem! You can do some volunteering work while traveling; it will be easier than you think. You can choose some fantastic volunteering programs at GoAbroad.com based on the country you want to visit, the causes you care about and the duration you have in mind.

Volunteering abroad will look exceptional on your resume and will help you to stand out from the competition. Employers will highly value your commitment, responsibility, and devotion.

3. Grasp a new language

Being able to communicate with international business is increasingly important in the workforce. Speaking a second language will broaden up your career prospects, and it may impact your overall earnings. In the United States, Spanish is the second most-spoken language, and it may help you not only to get a job in the customer service industry but also in many B2B career opportunities. Furthermore, languages like Mandarin and Arabic are becoming extremely useful in international business, and there is a lack of Americans who are bilingual in these two languages.

There are different ways you can learn a new language while traveling abroad after college. Some suggestions are: attend a short course in your destination country, enroll in an online language course, stay with a local host, chat to locals, read the papers, watch original version films with subtitles and download the dictionary app that best works for you. Even if you don’t become fluent in a new language, you will learn the basics, and that effort and knowledge are valued by hiring managers. Include your language skills on your resume to show you are a curious person, always trying to learn more and go the extra mile.


TIP: Make sure to supplement your online job search with networking. Once you get guidance from your network, target your online search to the right job titles and companies. After you apply, follow up with someone who works there. College Recruiter lists thousands of entry-level job opportunities. Would it make sense to start searching?


4. Build organizational skills

Traveling, just like business, requires a lot of organization. You will gain a set of skills that you will find highly useful later on in your career, including:

  • Managing budgets like a pro. If you run out of money too soon, your adventure is over!
  • Becoming more adaptable and flexible. If your original plans change, you need to be prepared for what is next.
  • Getting better and faster at problem-solving. If you get lost, for example, you may need to be able to read a complex map or get instructions and follow them correctly.
  • Being responsible for your own decisions. When you are on the road, you are constantly making decisions that will affect your travels. If for instance, you decide to take a bus instead of a train and it takes longer than expected, you will have less time to spend at your destination.

Overall, you will return from your adventure being a more mature and experienced person.

5. International networking

Take this opportunity to meet as many people as you can. Engaging with people from other cultures and backgrounds will enrich you as a person and will help you see life from different angles. Talk to locals and other travelers; you may find people abroad who are interested in your industry, and you never know who will recommend you in the future or where will you meet your next employer! Connecting with them on social media networks may be a good idea to stay in touch in the future.

6. Start a blog

Starting your own travel blog is the best way to put together your traveling experiences and tell the world. The benefits of starting a blog while traveling are endless: improve your writing skills, get better at photography and video, learn about online marketing, social media management, search engine optimization, develop relationships with other bloggers and so on.

All the abilities acquired creating a blog will help you land your first job even if it is in a completely different area. Your blogging capabilities will make you better at communicating, working faster and being more efficient. All appreciated skills for any job position.

If you are still in two minds about traveling abroad after college, talk to other people you know who have done it before. You will find out that nobody regrets having such a profound experience.

This infographic comes from Essay Writing Service UK:

Traveling after college is a viable option

Maria Onzainmaria-onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food. Connect with Maria on LinkedIn

 

 

 

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Posted June 18, 2016 by

5 insurance facts for recent grads

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When an individual is starting their career, it’s important to realize that life will throw many unexpected events on their way. This is something that happens to everyone. Having the right insurance can make getting past a difficult situation a lot easier. Financial experts agree there are a variety of insurance options available. There are also some types of insurance that are considered essential for dealing with unexpected things that can occur at any age.

1.    Individual Situation

It can be a challenge for a person starting a career to know what insurance they should purchase. Purchasing the right kinds of insurance should be determined by a person’s individual situation. A number of factors will determine this. It will involve employment benefits, age, lifestyle, and more. There are four different types of insurance experts recommend everyone have. They are health insurance, life insurance, long-term, and short-term disability insurance as well as homeowners/renters insurance.

2.    Health Insurance

In many cases, people starting a career could be just one serious illness away from disaster. According to a study done by Harvard University, 62 percent of all bankruptcies in the United States were a result of health related issues. Over 75 percent had some form of medical insurance. If a person has health insurance through their employer, they may want to consider the best plan offered. The key to getting the best possible health insurance is for a person to do research and know all of their options. Sometimes the least expensive health insurance is not always the best deal. Even with rising high co-payments and deductibles, health insurance is still something people must have. A minimal health insurance policy is still better than not having any type coverage.

3.    Life Insurance

According to an article in US News, people don’t often think of purchasing life insurance until after they’re married and have children. The reality is a younger person will be able to purchase a life insurance policy at a very low rate. This policy will grow in value over time. These types of life insurance policies can be adjusted as a person gets married and has children. This is the time when a person’s death could cause a financial burden to those who depend on them. If a person is unmarried and does not have children, it is also important they purchase life insurance. There is a good chance they will leave behind debts such as student loans, credit card bills, auto loans that must be paid. Without life insurance, these debts will become the responsibility of family members.

4.    Disability Insurance

This is the type of insurance people starting a career believe they may not need. Nobody who becomes injured or disabled on the job believed it would happen to them. According to statistics from the Social Security Administration (SSA) approximately 30 percent of individuals entering the workforce eventually become disabled. These are disabilities that make it impossible for a person to work until their retirement age. Workers with the best health insurance, generous savings, and good life insurance are not completely prepared to become disabled. Health insurance will cover medical bills and hospitalization. It’s common for employers to provide their employees with both short-term and long-term disability insurance coverage. If a person is an independent contractor or owns their own business, they can get this type of coverage from a private insurer.

5.    Homeowners/Renters Insurance


When a person is starting their career, they may need to rent a place to live. There are some leases that require a person to have renters insurance. This type of insurance will cover a person coming into a rental unit and getting injured. It can also cover a person’s things that might be stolen. Should a renter make a mistake and cause damage to the rental unit, this type of insurance may cover the damage. Should a person own a home and have a mortgage, the lender will probably require them to purchase and maintain homeowners insurance. In many cases, failure to pay a premium may be reported to the lender. Homeowners insurance is designed to cover the destruction of a structure, its contents. It can also protect a homeowner if someone is injured on their property and much more.

Michael Rogers, guest writer

Michael Rogers, Operations Director of US Insurance Agents

Do you need help making other major life decisions as a recent grad? Keep reading our blog for more tips and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

 Michael Rogers is the Operations Director of USInsuranceAgents.com. With over five years of experience and knowledge in the insurance industry, Michael contributes his level of expertise as a leader and an agent to educate and secure coverage for thousands of clients.

 

Posted June 13, 2016 by

Top 9 excuses for not attending a job interview

 

Oh no! Something has gone horribly wrong and now you can’t attend the job interview! What can you possibly say to the company to make them give you another chance? Well, whatever you are going to say, may I suggest that you say it as early as possible? Call in a timely fashion. This will show them you respect them and their time. This is vital if you want to make certain that you’ll get another chance. (more…)

Posted June 01, 2016 by

How to implement a yearlong onboarding program

How to implement a yearlong onboarding program

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

From learning the ins-and-outs of a company’s culture to specific job tasks, joining a new organization and starting a new job can be daunting.

That’s why it’s important for employers and HR professionals to establish a strong foundation for new employees to launch a productive and meaningful career by creating a strong onboarding program, says Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab, a global leader in water, hygiene, and energy technologies and services.

While many organizations focus on how to properly onboard an employee that first day on the job, most don’t have a dedicated yearlong onboarding program to help the employee through that first year on the job.

“When combined with functional training, a yearlong onboarding program can provide new employees tools to do their jobs, but additionally, can drive engagement through demonstrating employee and business success go hand-in-hand,” says Shofner.

Below, Shofner provides five onboarding milestones and strategies that help drive new employee engagement at Ecolab:

Day 1: Provide transparency in expectations and culture
All new employees start their first day eager, excited, and hopeful. Ensuring new employees feel welcomed and informed is the first step in maintaining this attitude beyond the first day, says Shofner.  Create a program that is consistent with company expectations and demonstrates your organization’s culture. Demonstrate not only “the what” but also “the how” work gets done. “This can help drive the environment that you want every employee to feel and help create,” says Shofner.

First 30 days: Enable a community for ongoing support
If you ask any employee at Ecolab why they work there, the resounding answer will be “the people” says Shofner. Knowing that relationships are part of Ecolab’s culture and success, the organization intentionally provide a system for networking. The “Buddy” program assigns new hires a contact to answer day-to-day questions, serve as a networking agent and helps them find a community within Ecolabs large organization. “Having one or two close contacts at work can be a powerful driver of initial job satisfaction,” says Shofner.

3 Months: Focus on engagement
Host a dedicated session that demonstrates commitment to employee engagement by providing specific activities to lead and socialize. “At Ecolab, leadership reminds us that are accountable for two areas,” says Shofner. “To grow our business and to grow our talent. Investment in growing talent can significantly impact an employee’s commitment to the company, but only if they are aware of the investment.” At this session, provide specific examples including leadership development programs, employee resource groups, a defined talent planning process, and social events such as intramural sports or team celebrations of success.

6 Months: Expand their vision
Introducing functional training is a good way to help employees develop a strategic understanding of their role and take ownership of their career path. Training provides tactical skill development and visibility into the broader organizational structure. At Ecolab best practices include a field ride-along to experience a day-in-the-life of a sales employees and classroom training led by senior leadership teams. Coach leaders to incorporate their leadership journeys, to include career and personal “peaks and valleys” which validate your leadership model, says Shofner.

One year anniversary: Celebrate
An employee’s one-year anniversary is an important milestone. At Ecolab, the CEO makes it a priority to attend annual celebrations that are part of the onboarding program. “It is a demonstration of the organization’s commitment to hiring, training and supporting talent,” says Shofner. “Dedicating time to recognize this significant achievement reinforces to the employee that they are appreciated and valued.”

Need advice for creating an onboarding program? Get onboard our blog and follow us on LinkedInYouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab

Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab

Jennifer Shofner is Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab, a global leader in water, hygiene and energy technologies and services. Her career in talent management has included various university and corporate roles where she is energized by helping individuals build careers they are proud of. In her spare time she enjoys volunteering for Minnesota’s talent initiative, MakeIt.MSP.org (check it out!) and supporting her alma mater’s sports teams – go Gophers!