• Young women going into business: You need to hear this advice from EY’s Angela Ciborowski

    May 10, 2018 by

     

    For women who are interested in going into business, there are many fantastic opportunities out there and many challenges as well. We spoke with Angela Ciborowski to discuss how young women can empower themselves to succeed in starting a business career. Ciborowski is an Associate Director at EY, where she leads MBA Strategic Programs and advises MBA recruiting.

    She is so passionate about empowering women in business that she created the Empower You Graduate Women’s Leadership Conference. This event is designed to lead, inspire and motivate future women leaders. Ciborowski provided some deep and insightful comments that we think will inspire you to move forward in your early career! Continue Reading

  • Attract students and grads with your wellness program, especially financial wellness

    April 10, 2018 by

     

    Wellness programs don’t just reduce costs by increasing the likelihood that your employees show up for work. A holistic and well managed wellness program can also serve as a recruitment tool.

    We know healthy employees who balance their work and personal lives are more productive. We know that poor physical, emotional and financial health distract employees while they are working and take them away from work to deal with personal issues. Employers have the opportunity to not only increase productivity but also attract talent by providing holistic wellness services. One important element to attract and support younger talent is a robust financial wellness program. Here we compile the expertise of several experts in wellness programs to help you sort out what will benefit your organization.  Continue Reading

  • Three ideas for finding meaning at your job

    December 02, 2016 by

    1680350Guest writer Jacob Merkley

    Work can sometimes be stressful, challenging, or perhaps even downright boring.  For some, it is hard to find reasons to get up in the morning and go to work.  For others, being at work means long hours of doing something you just don’t “love”.

    You don’t need to feel depressed about work when you wake up in the mornings, nor do you need to just work to get a paycheck.  No matter how you feel about your current situation, keep these three ideas in mind to find greater meaning and job satisfaction, no matter what it is.

     

    Change Your Attitude

    If you are comparing your current job to the imaginary one that satisfies everything you ever dreamed of, you may need a change in attitude. When things aren’t perfect, try to keep your cynicism in check. Remember the last time your job made you feel satisfied and empowered.  Embrace moments like these. Be grateful for the job you do have. Many people don’t have a job at all or are underemployed, and might love to be in your spot.

    Think Less About Yourself

    Sometimes it’s hard to not get caught up in what the job can do for you.  We all need a job.  We need the paycheck. But maybe it is time to consider what you can do for your job or your company. Think about the impact you are making on a daily basis.  Are you helping others? Are you helping your team members or the community?  Are you making a difference somehow? If you prioritize helping others, you might see your immediate environment become more positive and in turn affect your own outlook.

    Look Outside Work to Find Meaning

    If you really can’t make your work meaningful, then consider other ways that you can find meaning in your life.  Continue Reading

  • How traveling abroad after college can help you land your first job [infographic]

    October 31, 2016 by

     

    Are you thinking about traveling abroad after college, but you worry about entering the working world one year later? Don’t worry! In fact, traveling the world will help you acquire some very necessary skills to get your first job. While having fun and exploring new cultures, you will learn things you wouldn’t otherwise. And when you are back from your adventures, you can make travel look good on your resume and in an interview. Here are six ways to take advantage of your traveling experiences and stay on track to launch your career:

    1. Take time to reflect

    Knowing what you want to do straight after graduation can be quite challenging. Before making this important decision, it may be beneficial to take some time off to travel abroad and analyze the future of your career from a different perspective. Traveling will give you the chance to disconnect from your daily routine and have time for yourself to consider the different options.

    2. Volunteer

    If you have just finished college, you may not have any working experience yet. But that is not a problem! You can do some volunteering work while traveling; it will be easier than you think. You can choose some fantastic volunteering programs at GoAbroad.com based on the country you want to visit, the causes you care about and the duration you have in mind.

    Volunteering abroad will look exceptional on your resume and will help you to stand out from the competition. Employers will highly value your commitment, responsibility, and devotion.

    3. Grasp a new language

    Being able to communicate with international business is increasingly important in the workforce. Speaking a second language will broaden up your career prospects, and it may impact your overall earnings. In the United States, Spanish is the second most-spoken language, and it may help you not only to get a job in the customer service industry but also in many B2B career opportunities. Furthermore, languages like Mandarin and Arabic are becoming extremely useful in international business, and there is a lack of Americans who are bilingual in these two languages.

    There are different ways you can learn a new language while traveling abroad after college. Some suggestions are: attend a short course in your destination country, enroll in an online language course, stay with a local host, chat to locals, read the papers, watch original version films with subtitles and download the dictionary app that best works for you. Even if you don’t become fluent in a new language, you will learn the basics, and that effort and knowledge are valued by hiring managers. Include your language skills on your resume to show you are a curious person, always trying to learn more and go the extra mile.


    TIP: Make sure to supplement your online job search with networking. Once you get guidance from your network, target your online search to the right job titles and companies. After you apply, follow up with someone who works there. College Recruiter lists thousands of entry-level job opportunities. Would it make sense to start searching?


    4. Build organizational skills

    Traveling, just like business, requires a lot of organization. You will gain a set of skills that you will find highly useful later on in your career, including:

    • Managing budgets like a pro. If you run out of money too soon, your adventure is over!
    • Becoming more adaptable and flexible. If your original plans change, you need to be prepared for what is next.
    • Getting better and faster at problem-solving. If you get lost, for example, you may need to be able to read a complex map or get instructions and follow them correctly.
    • Being responsible for your own decisions. When you are on the road, you are constantly making decisions that will affect your travels. If for instance, you decide to take a bus instead of a train and it takes longer than expected, you will have less time to spend at your destination.

    Overall, you will return from your adventure being a more mature and experienced person.

    5. International networking

    Take this opportunity to meet as many people as you can. Engaging with people from other cultures and backgrounds will enrich you as a person and will help you see life from different angles. Talk to locals and other travelers; you may find people abroad who are interested in your industry, and you never know who will recommend you in the future or where will you meet your next employer! Connecting with them on social media networks may be a good idea to stay in touch in the future.

    6. Start a blog

    Starting your own travel blog is the best way to put together your traveling experiences and tell the world. The benefits of starting a blog while traveling are endless: improve your writing skills, get better at photography and video, learn about online marketing, social media management, search engine optimization, develop relationships with other bloggers and so on.

    All the abilities acquired creating a blog will help you land your first job even if it is in a completely different area. Your blogging capabilities will make you better at communicating, working faster and being more efficient. All appreciated skills for any job position.

    If you are still in two minds about traveling abroad after college, talk to other people you know who have done it before. You will find out that nobody regrets having such a profound experience.

    This infographic comes from Essay Writing Service UK:

    Traveling after college is a viable option

    Maria Onzainmaria-onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food. Connect with Maria on LinkedIn

     

     

     

    Want more job search and career advice? Stay connected with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube

  • 5 insurance facts for recent grads

    June 18, 2016 by
    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    When an individual is starting their career, it’s important to realize that life will throw many unexpected events on their way. This is something that happens to everyone. Having the right insurance can make getting past a difficult situation a lot easier. Financial experts agree there are a variety of insurance options available. There are also some types of insurance that are considered essential for dealing with unexpected things that can occur at any age.

    1.    Individual Situation

    It can be a challenge for a person starting a career to know what insurance they should purchase. Purchasing the right kinds of insurance should be determined by a person’s individual situation. A number of factors will determine this. It will involve employment benefits, age, lifestyle, and more. There are four different types of insurance experts recommend everyone have. They are health insurance, life insurance, long-term, and short-term disability insurance as well as homeowners/renters insurance.

    2.    Health Insurance

    In many cases, people starting a career could be just one serious illness away from disaster. According to a study done by Harvard University, 62 percent of all bankruptcies in the United States were a result of health related issues. Over 75 percent had some form of medical insurance. If a person has health insurance through their employer, they may want to consider the best plan offered. The key to getting the best possible health insurance is for a person to do research and know all of their options. Sometimes the least expensive health insurance is not always the best deal. Even with rising high co-payments and deductibles, health insurance is still something people must have. A minimal health insurance policy is still better than not having any type coverage.

    3.    Life Insurance

    According to an article in US News, people don’t often think of purchasing life insurance until after they’re married and have children. The reality is a younger person will be able to purchase a life insurance policy at a very low rate. This policy will grow in value over time. These types of life insurance policies can be adjusted as a person gets married and has children. This is the time when a person’s death could cause a financial burden to those who depend on them. If a person is unmarried and does not have children, it is also important they purchase life insurance. There is a good chance they will leave behind debts such as student loans, credit card bills, auto loans that must be paid. Without life insurance, these debts will become the responsibility of family members.

    4.    Disability Insurance

    This is the type of insurance people starting a career believe they may not need. Nobody who becomes injured or disabled on the job believed it would happen to them. According to statistics from the Social Security Administration (SSA) approximately 30 percent of individuals entering the workforce eventually become disabled. These are disabilities that make it impossible for a person to work until their retirement age. Workers with the best health insurance, generous savings, and good life insurance are not completely prepared to become disabled. Health insurance will cover medical bills and hospitalization. It’s common for employers to provide their employees with both short-term and long-term disability insurance coverage. If a person is an independent contractor or owns their own business, they can get this type of coverage from a private insurer.

    5.    Homeowners/Renters Insurance


    When a person is starting their career, they may need to rent a place to live. There are some leases that require a person to have renters insurance. This type of insurance will cover a person coming into a rental unit and getting injured. It can also cover a person’s things that might be stolen. Should a renter make a mistake and cause damage to the rental unit, this type of insurance may cover the damage. Should a person own a home and have a mortgage, the lender will probably require them to purchase and maintain homeowners insurance. In many cases, failure to pay a premium may be reported to the lender. Homeowners insurance is designed to cover the destruction of a structure, its contents. It can also protect a homeowner if someone is injured on their property and much more.

    Michael Rogers, guest writer

    Michael Rogers, Operations Director of US Insurance Agents

    Do you need help making other major life decisions as a recent grad? Keep reading our blog for more tips and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

     Michael Rogers is the Operations Director of USInsuranceAgents.com. With over five years of experience and knowledge in the insurance industry, Michael contributes his level of expertise as a leader and an agent to educate and secure coverage for thousands of clients.

     

  • Top 9 excuses for not attending a job interview

    June 13, 2016 by

     

    Oh no! Something has gone horribly wrong and now you can’t attend the job interview! What can you possibly say to the company to make them give you another chance? Well, whatever you are going to say, may I suggest that you say it as early as possible? Call in a timely fashion. This will show them you respect them and their time. This is vital if you want to make certain that you’ll get another chance. Continue Reading

  • How to implement a yearlong onboarding program

    June 01, 2016 by
    How to implement a yearlong onboarding program

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    From learning the ins-and-outs of a company’s culture to specific job tasks, joining a new organization and starting a new job can be daunting.

    That’s why it’s important for employers and HR professionals to establish a strong foundation for new employees to launch a productive and meaningful career by creating a strong onboarding program, says Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab, a global leader in water, hygiene, and energy technologies and services.

    While many organizations focus on how to properly onboard an employee that first day on the job, most don’t have a dedicated yearlong onboarding program to help the employee through that first year on the job.

    “When combined with functional training, a yearlong onboarding program can provide new employees tools to do their jobs, but additionally, can drive engagement through demonstrating employee and business success go hand-in-hand,” says Shofner.

    Below, Shofner provides five onboarding milestones and strategies that help drive new employee engagement at Ecolab:

    Day 1: Provide transparency in expectations and culture
    All new employees start their first day eager, excited, and hopeful. Ensuring new employees feel welcomed and informed is the first step in maintaining this attitude beyond the first day, says Shofner.  Create a program that is consistent with company expectations and demonstrates your organization’s culture. Demonstrate not only “the what” but also “the how” work gets done. “This can help drive the environment that you want every employee to feel and help create,” says Shofner.

    First 30 days: Enable a community for ongoing support
    If you ask any employee at Ecolab why they work there, the resounding answer will be “the people” says Shofner. Knowing that relationships are part of Ecolab’s culture and success, the organization intentionally provide a system for networking. The “Buddy” program assigns new hires a contact to answer day-to-day questions, serve as a networking agent and helps them find a community within Ecolabs large organization. “Having one or two close contacts at work can be a powerful driver of initial job satisfaction,” says Shofner.

    3 Months: Focus on engagement
    Host a dedicated session that demonstrates commitment to employee engagement by providing specific activities to lead and socialize. “At Ecolab, leadership reminds us that are accountable for two areas,” says Shofner. “To grow our business and to grow our talent. Investment in growing talent can significantly impact an employee’s commitment to the company, but only if they are aware of the investment.” At this session, provide specific examples including leadership development programs, employee resource groups, a defined talent planning process, and social events such as intramural sports or team celebrations of success.

    6 Months: Expand their vision
    Introducing functional training is a good way to help employees develop a strategic understanding of their role and take ownership of their career path. Training provides tactical skill development and visibility into the broader organizational structure. At Ecolab best practices include a field ride-along to experience a day-in-the-life of a sales employees and classroom training led by senior leadership teams. Coach leaders to incorporate their leadership journeys, to include career and personal “peaks and valleys” which validate your leadership model, says Shofner.

    One year anniversary: Celebrate
    An employee’s one-year anniversary is an important milestone. At Ecolab, the CEO makes it a priority to attend annual celebrations that are part of the onboarding program. “It is a demonstration of the organization’s commitment to hiring, training and supporting talent,” says Shofner. “Dedicating time to recognize this significant achievement reinforces to the employee that they are appreciated and valued.”

    Need advice for creating an onboarding program? Get onboard our blog and follow us on LinkedInYouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab

    Jennifer Shofner, Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab

    Jennifer Shofner is Manager, Campus Talent Acquisition at Ecolab, a global leader in water, hygiene and energy technologies and services. Her career in talent management has included various university and corporate roles where she is energized by helping individuals build careers they are proud of. In her spare time she enjoys volunteering for Minnesota’s talent initiative, MakeIt.MSP.org (check it out!) and supporting her alma mater’s sports teams – go Gophers!

  • How new overtime laws will affect interns and recent grads

    May 27, 2016 by
    How the new overtime laws will affect recent college graduates

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    How will the new overtime laws affect interns and recent grads? A variety of experts weigh in on this hot topic.

    Changes to overtime laws

    The Department of Labor expects the new overtime laws to affect 4.2 million workers – many of whom are likely new college grads out on their first “real” job.  As of December 1, 2016, the days of working 50+ hours a week and earning $35,000 should be gone, says Kate Bischoff, a human resources professional and employment/labor law attorney with the Minneapolis office of Zelle LLP, an international litigation and dispute resolution law firm. Bischoff is co-leading a June 2, 2016, webinar titled Preparing for Changes to FLSA Overtime Regulations, discussing this topic and more.

    Salary versus hourly

    There’s one thing college graduates should keep in mind, says Bischoff, and that is that salary has nothing to do with status.

    “Being paid a salary doesn’t mean that an employee is more valuable to his or her employer than an hourly employee,” says Bischoff. “It is simply a different way of paying people for their work.”

    Those who are nonexempt – those eligible for overtime – may earn time and a half when they work long hours and may even earn more than their salaried brethren, points out Bischoff. Those who are exempt and earn more than $913 a week will not be compensated for their long hours in the office in the form of hourly payments. In fact, when some employees shift from salaried to hourly, many times, they earn more as an hourly employee.

    The other thing about being paid on an hourly basis is that employers need to know how much you work, says Bischoff. With apps on smartphones and smart watches, employees can now track their time easier than ever before. “If you track your steps, you can track your hours,” says Bischoff. “The fact that you have to punch in or clock out only means you need to capture your time to get paid the value of your work. That’s all.”

    Ask questions to clarify status

    So what should college grads do and consider before accepting a job, or if they have questions about their current and future employment status at their existing job? Ask questions such as these, says Bischoff:

    • What will their overtime status be?
    • Will this position be eligible for overtime?
    • Will I be paid a salary?

    “For many college grads, work-life balance is important, so ask if you will be able to make it to your volunteer activity every Thursday evening,” says Bischoff. “While asking if you will ‘have to’ work overtime may be a signal to an employer that you might not be a dedicated employee, you can ask about particular events or activities important to you. You may glean from the answer the amount of hours you will put in.”

    What do the new overtime laws mean for interns?

    Currently, the vast majority of interns earn less than the $23,660 DOL threshold and therefore are classified as non-exempt and qualify for overtime. When the new rules take effect on December 1, 2016, the threshold will almost double to $50,440. The number of interns who earn between $23,660 and $50,440 is miniscule and, therefore, the law will directly impact virtually no interns, says Steven Rothberg, founder of College Recruiter. That said, there could be a substantial impact on new grad hiring as virtually all new grads earn more than $23,660, the average is about $46,000, and a substantial minority earn more than the $50,440.

    “At College Recruiter, we believe that the law will have a substantial impact on the number of hours worked by management trainees and other such workers who have traditionally been paid as exempt, salaried employees with no ability to earn overtime pay yet who routinely work far more than the standard 40-hour work week,” says Rothberg. “Employers will likely instruct these employees not to work more than 40-hours per week, which will effectively increase the compensation paid to and reduce the return on investment generated from these employees. Yet with a tightening labor market, more Baby Boomers retiring, and fewer Millennials graduating, it is unlikely that there will be any noticeable change in the number of recent grads finding employment within their chosen career paths.”

    Manufacturing director: New OT laws could hurt interns and recent grads

    John Johnston is Director of Manufacturing at States Manufacturing, a Minneapolis-based custom electrical and precision fabricated metal company with 49 employees.

    He fears the new overtime laws will hurt interns and new hires, namely those graduating from college or technical schools.

    “I would expect the starting wage to decrease to compensate for the change in overtime rules,” says Johnston. “Also, I would tend to expect the opportunities to reduce as well as the patience of employers. If we are going to pay more, we are going to raise our expectations and be less patient with someone because of the wage they are earning. When we have had lower wage earners at the start of their career, we are able to be more patient in part because the issues are not as magnified with a lesser wage. Once that increases, we have no choice but to be tougher that much quicker.”

    Johnston said his company may avoid hiring interns in the future due to the increased costs and instead balance it with multiple part-time employees. The company currently does not have any interns, partly because they were sorting out the details of the new labor and overtime laws.

    “I see this as a trend to save on escalating costs since benefits would not be required with part-time employees,” says Johnston.

    A ripple effect for college grads

    Elliot D. Lasson, Ph.D., SPHR, SHRM-SCP, is an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Rockville, Maryland and a Human Capital Consultant with Lasson Talent Solutions. Lasson regularly presents to students on behalf of college career centers.

    According to Lasson, the new overtime regulations will have ripple affects all around.

    “Students who are in college or right out of college want to gain meaningful experience,” he said. “They are not paying all that money to be flipping burgers or driving for Uber after graduation. The conventional wisdom is that internships are valuable. And they objectively are. However, many employers misappropriate that label to justify in order to get free labor from students who feel desperate for that experience. In many cases, internships play out in a way where the students are gaining only minimal exposure to the workplace and field, while at the same time are not getting paid.”

    The Department of Labor previously identified six conditions that must be met in order to permit unpaid internship scenarios. “Many employers play fast and loose with these under the pretense that the work environment itself is more important than it objectively is,” says Lasson. And now, this extends to graduate school as well. The grad students are still “students” and therefore unlike their undergraduate peers who are not in graduate school can still “qualify” to be unpaid interns while in graduate school.  So, there is additional abuse of the system here as well, says Lasson.

    “With the popularity of unpaid internships, many employers are inundated with requests and may just take advantage of students without having a handle on the DOL guidelines,” says Lasson.

    For more career tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • 4 ways college students can stay creative

    May 07, 2016 by
    Concentrated college student drawing picture at the college courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock.com

    College is a place where students get prepared for their professional lives. it is because of this that every teacher and course instructor puts extra effort in training their students.

    Due to late night study sessions, tons of assignments, and class presentations, students feel tired and lose their creativity.

    As a result, college students experience a drastic decline to their overall academic results.

    Being a student counselor and motivational speaker, it is my responsibility to guide students, and I simply love this job. I am extremely passionate in helping students through proven techniques and effective advice.

    Similarly, I have narrowed down a couple of striking ways for students that will surely help them stay creative throughout their four-year degree programs.

    I am pretty sure after implementing these ways mentioned below, students will be able stay ahead of the competition.

    So, let’s get started…

    1. Go out for a morning walk

    Apart from hectic study schedules, college students should focus on their mental and physical health as well. This way, they will not only be able to boost their energy but will also get ready to take on any challenge quite easily.

    For this, the best thing students can do is go for a morning walk without taking a single day off. Somehow, if there is no park available in their locality, then go to the gym.

    The gym is an incredible place where students can get several types of machines to train their bodies and minds for rest of the day.

    I strongly believe after practicing this habit for a few days that students will feel a positive change to their study approaches.

    2. Create a study planner and stick to it

    Studying without an actionable planner is like chasing a big total in the game of cricket without calculating the pitch condition.

    If college students desperately want to attain tremendous results without compromising their creativity, then they definitely need to come up with a sensible study schedule. This way, students will understand their capabilities to maximize them accordingly.

    To create a study planner, I would suggest students follow a very traditional approach. I actually mean instead of taking help from technology, grab a pen with a piece of paper and write down all their intended tasks on it.

    It is truly a remarkable way that will keep students updated on their priority tasks.

    3. Watch motivational videos and stories

    If college students always want to keep themselves energized, they should watch as many motivational videos as possible. It is a golden trick that will enhance their thinking capabilities and make them stronger enough to deal with any type of situation.

    Furthermore, if they love reading, then students should go to their nearest book shop and buy one or two famous motivational books. Once they start reading them, they will learn different styles and tricks to handle pressure.

    4. Plot short intervals between study sessions

    College students don’t need to treat themselves like robots. Instead, they should utilize their brains according to their strength and limitations.

    A majority of students believe non-stop studying for a longer period of time can be the right strategy to accomplish the ultimate goal. But to be honest, it is not an appropriate way.

    If students believe in quality, they should give their brains considerable breaks. When studying, make sure to take a couple of valuable short intervals to rejuvenate the mind.

    If college students are studying to improve their creativity and knowledge, then the aforementioned ways will absolutely work for them.

    For more tips to help college students, make your way to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    John Bishop, guest writer

    John Bishop, guest writer

    John Bishop is a Student Counselor and Motivational Speaker at an academic coaching “Dissertation Help”. He has been serving in this academic coaching firm for the last five years. He writes for numerous career related websites too.

  • Stay-at-home mom to CEO: Transferring skills to the workplace

    May 04, 2016 by

    During one of our one-on-one meetings, Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, laughed as I described some of my potty training woes with my toddler.

    “Just continue to lower your parenting expectations, and you’ll be fine.”

    This sage advice has saved me from numerous mommy meltdowns. Faith Rothberg is not only a wonderful workplace mentor, but she’s also a mentor for young moms as well. Faith was recently featured in an article about returning to the workplace by OptIn as well.

    Faith, a mother of three children, two of whom no longer reside at home, is a true parenting expert. She chose to stay home to care for her children after establishing her own career in the field of information technology after earning her MBA at the University of Michigan. Before earning her stay-at-home mom (SAHM) status, she worked for Ford Motor Company as a programmer, a manufacturing information technology consultant for KPMG, and for Wells Fargo as a project manager. Faith’s family photos adorn the walls of her house—even her home office—and she doesn’t hide the fact that her family comes first.

    Yet as CEO of College Recruiter, an online recruitment media company named one of the world’s top career sites by Forbes, WEDDLE’s, and Business.com, how does Faith strike a balance between work and family? How did she transition back into the workplace after staying home with her children for 13 years? How did her SAHM experience provide her with transferable skills which now benefit her as CEO?

    I recently interviewed my boss, Faith Rothberg, to ask her these very questions and more.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Faith made the decision to stay home with her children after her second son was born. She admits she didn’t feel she was doing well as a mom or as a professional at this time in her life. The biggest surprise she had at this time was how hard it felt to be home every day and how many decisions she was faced with making all day long while caring for her children. She realized right away that she was building better multitasking skills, decision-making, and problem-solving skills as a parent. These are transferable skills that certainly aid her now in the workplace.

    Many stay-at-home moms struggle when deciding whether to re-enter the workplace. “I don’t know if you ever know exactly that it’s the right time. When I made the decision to come back and start in our business . . . it was really good timing for the business, and it was almost good timing for me,” Faith candidly shares.

    She admits she was worried she would not be able to be as available for her children. There was certainly an emotional component which was difficult during the transition back to work.

    Faith suggests that parents who stay home with their children should remain active in their communities and at their children’s schools. Parents can volunteer in the classroom, on committees, and in non-profit organizations in order to round out their resumes to avoid major gaps with absolutely no experience.

    Faith offers three tips for stay-at-home moms considering a return to the workplace.

    1. Evaluate what you want to do.

    Often what you were doing before you had children isn’t what you want to do now (when returning to the workplace). You may have had a great paying job before having children, but now you may have different goals or objectives. Take some time and either work with a career coach or take career assessments online to reevaluate your goals. Get a career mentor and seek advice and guidance.

    1. Once you know what you want to do, update your resume.

    You’ll have a gap on your resume during the time you stayed home with your children, and you may not have professional work experience to list on your resume during this gap. Use the volunteer experience and community involvement to fill in the gaps on your resume.

    1. Network.

    Network with other children’s parents and with the spouses of those other stay-at-home parents. Network back with your former coworkers. Use LinkedIn and other social media sites. Send your resume to your contacts and friends and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

    For more tips related to transferable skills, transitioning back into the workforce, and searching for jobs, visit our blog and follow us on social media at LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.