ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 03, 2019 by

How to optimize your job posting ads in the era of Google for Jobs and Google Cloud Talent Solutions

College Recruiter was one of the first job boards to replace its proprietary job search technology with what is now called Google Cloud Talent Solutions (CTS).

We went live about 15-months ago in January 2018 and have been very, very happy. As I discussed on a recent episode of The Chad and Cheese Podcast, the results we’ve seen have been superb: far more candidates searching far more jobs and far more applying to those jobs. In addition, our costs have plummeted because we’re saving a ton of development and customer service time.

But the transition has also been eye opening to us in terms of pretty minor adjustments that very few employers are either aware of or are willing to make yet which would yield great results for them. Here are just some:

  • Include compensation, even if it is a range. Most employers are still reluctant to disclose compensation range because, they typically claim, it undermines their ability to negotiate with the candidate. That reveals a problem with their negotiation skills and that’s understandable, but fix the negotiation skills. Some employers want to underpay employees and that’s why they don’t want to reveal the salary ranges, but it isn’t 1952. Employees can easily find out if they’re fairly paid and those who aren’t will become disgruntled and leave, which leads to a lack of productivity and so any money they may have saved in wages will more than be offset by the productivity issues.
  • Include street address, city, state/province, postal code, and country for every job. If the jobs are remote, denote that in your location field using a word like “remote” so that Google can easily identify those. Without the street address, Google has a harder time figuring out the exact location of the job and that leads to problems with the new commute search feature. College Recruiter built a bunch of code to get around this problem, but few job boards will do that. If we don’t get the street address, we use the Google Maps API to look-up the address and then we feed that to the CTS API, but some employers have multiple locations in a city and so our look-up may identify the wrong location. Also, some employers don’t have every location listed in Google Maps, such as those who have field offices. If your field office isn’t listed, then a Maps API look-up won’t work properly. Our search is now commute time driven rather than location driven. With Google CTS powering 4,000 job boards and ATS sites, the days of looking at candidates looking at location and inferring commute time are, thankfully, quickly coming to an end.
  • I know from The Chad and Cheese Podcast that Chad Sowash and Joel Cheesman hate the use of words like “ninja” in job descriptions and that’s fair, but the use of those words isn’t a problem if the employer also uses more standard language like “sales representative.” The standard language will allow CTS to infer what the job is about, and it is amazing how accurately CTS does that.
  • For years, Joel and other SEO experts have tried to convey to employers and others that they need to think of a job posting as a web page and that web pages need to be SEO optimized. That’s still the case, but isn’t as critical as it used to be because Google is smarter than it used to be. Still, the most important signal to Google and therefore to job boards and ATS that use CTS about what the job is about is the job title. Do not use internal jargon like SE II to refer to a Software Engineer Level 2. In fact, don’t refer to “Level 2” at all because that’s only meaningful internally. Use for the job title language like, “Software Engineer Team Lead” as that’s more meaningful externally. If your lawyers tell you that you need to use SE II, well, get new lawyers or stop lying about what they’re telling you as that’s bullshit. Second, use the internally approved language in the body of the job description but use externally accepted language in the job title field.
  • Think about Amazon recommendations when writing a job title. If you like A, you’ll also probably like B. Include language like that in your job descriptions. “If you like math, then you’ll love this job as our programmatic job ad buying manager”. Google will understand that someone who searches for jobs using the keyword “math” should be shown that job because of the keyword, but it will also understand to show that job to someone who searches for jobs using keywords like statistics and physics. This is starting to happen. One of our employer customers is hiring hundreds of people for a maintenance technician job and they started to see respiratory therapist applying. They interviewed some, hired some, and want to hire more. I didn’t get the connection until they told me that respiratory therapist know how to operate machinery and that’s what the technicians do.
Posted March 19, 2019 by

It’s crummy to search for a job based upon its distance. Now you can search by commute time.

Minneapolis, MN (March 19, 2019) — It has only taken 410 years, but help wanted and other recruitment advertising is finally catching up to what job seekers have always wanted to know: how long will it take me to get to this job?

The movable type, printing press was invented in 1609 and within decades employers were placing help wanted ads in them. George Washington’s Continental Army posted recruitment ads in local newspapers. But for that entire time, employers, newspapers, online job boards, and other sources of classified advertising have shifted the effort of determining how long it will take to get to a job to the candidate by publishing the location of the job and, even then, often only publishing the city in which it was located. As a candidate, you can guess at how long it will take to get from your apartment to a job, but wouldn’t it be great if you didn’t have to guess but instead would just see a list of jobs that match your interests along with the commute time to each of them by driving, transit, cycling, and walking and both during peak and non-peak times? Now, you can.

College Recruiter was an early, early partner of Google’s with its Cloud Talent Solution product. A little over a year ago in January 2018, we replaced our job search engine with their search technology. The jobs you see on College Recruiter were posted to College Recruiter so you aren’t searching the entire web as you are when you’re on Google.com. Since before we even signed our licensing agreement with them, they’ve been superb partners in helping improve the discoverability of the hundreds of thousands of part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs advertised at any given time on our site, as well as matching those jobs with the right candidates. For employers, reaching a larger talent pool is consistently top of mind, and we and our partners at Google also hear from — and listen to — job seekers about their unique job search and employment needs.

College Recruiter and Google are always working to add new features and functionality to connect employers and job seekers. Last year, Google added job search by U.S. military occupational specialty code for College Recruiter and other Cloud Talent Solution customers in the United States. Today and together, we’re announcing that College Recruiter now supports commute search by driving, transit, cycling, and walking AND candidates can search our site using any of 100+ languages, so if their primary language is Spanish and secondary language is English, they can search in Spanish, we’ll display the job posting ads in English, and the employer who receives their application will be well on their way to hiring a well matched candidate who has the highly sought after skill of being bilingual.

“At College Recruiter, we’re very excited about the enhancement to the Cloud Talent Solutions commute search option,” said Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter. “Many of the job seekers who use our site are looking for part-time, seasonal, and internship opportunities while they’re in school, and many of them would strongly prefer to work within walking or cycling distance so they can avoid the cost and hassle of driving or using public transportation. Now, they can search for a part-time, retail job within a 10-minute walk from their apartment instead of having to weed through dozens or even hundreds of part-time, retail jobs which are listed within their city.”

Listen to today’s episode of The Chad and Cheese Podcast for more information about the background of why College Recruiter chose to replace its search technology with that it licenses from Google, the impact of that decision, or the latest features that we’ve rolled out as a result of that partnership. During the podcast, hosts Chad Sowash and Joel Cheesman discuss all of these issues and more with guest, Steven Rothberg, the founder of College Recruiter.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

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Posted December 13, 2018 by

Video, slides, and recap of College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google

 

Wow, did we ever receive great feedback from Monday’s College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google. I thought I should share some highlights:

  • All 200 available tickets sold-out almost a week ahead of the event thanks, in part, to promotional efforts by the Association of Talent Acquisition Professionals, CareerXroads, Recruiting Brainfood, and Jibe.
  • A handful let us know that they couldn’t attend. We gave their tickets to people on the waitlist.
  • Attendees at the Sunday evening reception, sponsored by TalentNet Inc., enjoyed crab, steak, grilled vegetables, adult beverages, and more than a few laughs.
  • Whitney Selfridge, Google’s Product Marketing Manager, and Faith Rothberg, College Recruiter’s Chief Executive Officer, warmly welcomed the hundreds who attended in-person and via the live stream, which was sponsored by AllyO.
  • I delivered an overview of how AI is already being used in the recruitment industry.
  • Tarquin Clark, Director of Partnerships and Go To Market for Google’s Cloud Talent Solutions, delivered the opening keynote on how AI can better our education, businesses, and careers. He then moderated a panel discussion featuring Roopesh Nair, President and Chief Executive Officer of Symphony Talent; Jayne Kettles, Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer for gr8 People; Joe Essenfeld, Chief Executive Officer and Founder of Jibe; and Justin Lumby, Vice President of Technology Strategy for TalentNet Inc.
  • Alexandra Levit of PeopleResults and author of Humanity Works delivered the featured presentation on how technology and people will merge in future workforces. She then moderated a panel discussion featuring Jennifer Sethre, CEO and Founder of Intry; Wahab Owolabi, Recruiting Manager for Rubrik; Jared Bazzell, Talent Acquisition Manager – Campus for CDW; and Doug Berg, Founder of ZAPinfo. Thanks to ZAPinfo, 100 attendees received a copy of Alexandra’s excellent, new book.
  • After a delicious lunch sponsored by our partner, Google, we were treated to the closing keynote by John Sumser of HR Examiner on AI, the algorithms, and who owns the outcomes. He then moderated a spirited discussion with panelists Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel; Derek Zeller, Director of Recruiting Solutions and Channels for ENGAGE Talent; Richard Rosenow, Workforce Planning Analyst for Facebook; and Heather Bussing of the Law Offices of Heather Bussing.

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Aircraft engine in hanger

Posted July 11, 2018 by

What Delta Air Lines is doing to address talent gaps 

When Delta Air Lines looks into the future, they see a shortage of talent in a particular area. That is, they know many pilots will be retiring and there aren’t enough new pilots in the pipeline to replace them. Filling mechanic roles is also an area where Delta predicts a talent shortage. We spoke with John Patrick, who is Senior Manager of Academic Strategy at Delta. He told us more about how they are responding to this talent gap with unique recruiting and branding strategies.

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Posted May 18, 2018 by

Nonprofit employer branding solutions to attract entry-level talent

 

Nonprofit organizations have an enormous opportunity to polish their employer brands and really show them off to entry-level job candidates. To hear insight into employer branding mistakes and solutions at nonprofits, we interviewed Matt Kaiser, Director of Recruitment at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Kaiser has a passion for improving the recruitment processes, uncovering a unique employer brand identity, and implementing ideas to improve the candidate experience and attract top talent. He will be a speaker at SHRM 2018, presenting “Pursuing Purpose in Building Your Brand.”

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Posted May 08, 2018 by

How does programmatic job ad buying benefit talent acquisition and other HR leaders?

 

Over the past couple of years, those of us who make our living in the job board world have grown from being aware of the existence of programmatic ad buying, to understanding the opportunities and threats it poses. We grew to either be terrified by it or embrace it, or some combination of the two. At College Recruiter, we made the decision early on to embrace programmatic job ad buying because we saw that the opportunity it presented to our employer customers (and therefore us) far outweighed the threat that it posed.

Since 1991, when I founded the organization that became College Recruiter, I’ve often been accused of chasing after every shiny new thing. That’s not fair. I do chase after shiny new things, but not always. And sometimes they chase after me. Also, the accusation can be interpreted as a negative character trait. That’s also not fair because seeing opportunities and risks where others don’t can be valuable. That’s true whether you’re a caveman hunting for food or a talent acquisition or other human resources leader hunting for more efficient and effective ways of attracting the talent that your organization needs–not just to survive but also to thrive.

Case in point: programmatic job ad buying. This was the shiny new thing that proved to be worthy of attention. (more…)

Posted February 08, 2018 by

Strategies to address the tech skills gap and plan your future workforce

 

We wanted to know how employers are addressing the tech skills gap and learning to prepare their future workforce pipeline. We met with Parvathi Sivaraman and Maan Hamdan from Education Unbound, which was formed to build up STEAM in education. By supporting education, they also help reduce the expected tech skills gap and mitigate some of the negative impact automation will have on many traditional jobs. (more…)

Posted May 18, 2017 by

[Infographic] Apprenticeships are a new way for corporate employers to attract talent

Apprenticeships are a new way for employers to attract and develop talent

 

An apprenticeship is three things:

  • It’s a job
  • It’s education
  • It’s a great opportunity

That’s according to Apprentice Washington, a Division of the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. While apprenticeships are common in the trades, apprenticeships are also valuable ways for college students and recent college grads to add and learn new skills in just about any profession, including jobs in the corporate world.

Apprentice Washington says: “There are apprenticeships for nearly any job you can imagine: From high-tech manufacturing to health care.”

And that’s why employers looking to attract, recruit and retain talented workers, should consider the benefits of implementing an apprenticeship program, or hiring apprentices.

Apprenticeships are making a worldwide comeback

Apprenticeships are suddenly popular in the United Kingdom because the government recently implemented a new tax on corporations which requires corporations to pay a “use it or lose it” tax that can be used to train apprentices, therefore incentivizing corporations to hire apprentices, or to turn current employees into apprentices through learning and development contracts.

“I believe this is one of the largest changes to workforce planning in many years in the UK,” says Ilona Jurkiewicz, head of the Early Careers Program at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm. In her role with the Early Careers Program at Thomson Reuters, Jurkiewicz leads internal and external strategy for how Thomson Reuters attracts, assesses, develops, engages, and retains early career talent, including those completing apprenticeships. “And, although this feels like a seismic shift, apprentice strategies are in place in a number of countries already and commonly used, for example, in Germany, France, and Australia.”

In May, Government Canada announced plans to invest $85 million in apprenticeship programs. And now, United States business leaders are starting to take note. On May 16, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced $4.2 Million in federal funding was secured to expand New York’s apprenticeship program. Forbes’ recently wrote that it’s time for America to expand the modern Apprenticeship, stating that “calls for the U.S. to expand apprenticeship programs seem to be gaining more traction daily.” This is backed by news that the Trump Administration has plans to adopt a nationwide target to hire five million apprenticeships in five years. Hertz, Sears, CVS Health, WalMart, and Enterprise Rent-A-Car are among five large U.S. employers who already have apprenticeship programs in place.

John Ladd, Administrator at the USDOL/ETA Office of Apprenticeship, is fired up about the role apprenticeships can play in today’s workforce, saying “apprenticeship is big-tent business, and the tent continues to expand. It’s drawing in new champions from the business and philanthropic communities every day, linking their resources to those of state and local workforce agencies, education partners like community colleges and school districts, industry associations, unions and other apprenticeship sponsors.”

The approach is aggressive. And that should be a welcomed approach for employers seeking alternative methods to finding skilled workers in both the trades, and corporate world.

“We need more pathways for job seekers, and as the world realizes that diversity of background and approach is important, I believe apprenticeships will become a more viable and available opportunity for students,” says Jurkiewicz.

How one employer benefits from an apprenticeship program

Growing Leaders is a global nonprofit that encourages and equips young adults to take on real-life opportunities and challenges in the classroom, in their careers, and in the community. The company implemented an apprenticeship program for recent college grads, citing the opportunity to live out the company’s internal values to train up the next generation of leaders.

“Some view this next generation as a problem, we view them as a solution,” says Tim Elmore, President of Growing Leaders, and author of Marching Off The Map, which provides understanding and how to practically apply the latest research on Generation Z.

Apprentices gain a chance to invest further in a set of skills (project management, selling, customer service) or in a function (marketing, operations, sales), said Elmore.

“Depending on the apprenticeship, it can also give the student quantifiable results that he or she contributed to,” added Elmore.

It also gives the employer a chance to train the employee their way, and also, try before they buy – similar to an internship – where they can determine if an apprentice is the right fit for a full-time job.

“An apprenticeship allows more time to train a new graduate before they enter a full time position, and allows a trial period to see if he or she would be a good fit on our team,” says Elmore.

What exactly is an apprenticeship?

In simple terms, an apprentice is someone learning a skill, says Jurkiewicz. An apprentice can be someone just starting their career, or learning a trade, or someone like a recent college grad at the beginning of their career and entering the world of work. An apprentice can even be an experienced professional working towards an advanced degree or certification.

What employers need to know about apprenticeships

  • Apprenticeships are often paid
  • Apprenticeships vary in length, so it tends to be driven by type of apprenticeship you are implementing and then the way the person is learning.
  • Employers often implement one off apprenticeships (hiring an individual for a specific role), as well as more programmatic approaches (a full apprenticeship program, with set criteria, similar to an internship program).

An apprenticeship is unique and different from an internship or internship program. During an apprenticeship, there is a formal or informal contract between the apprentice, an employer, and sometimes a certifying body (a university or education body) through which the apprenticeship is attaining skills, says Jurkiewicz. At Growing Leaders the apprentice commits to an eight to 12 month apprenticeship, versus say a summer internship, which may be three or four months.

“At the end of an apprenticeship, a student will have a more in-depth understanding of a certain function of business and clearer picture of how an organization operates,” says Elmore.

The long-term benefits of apprenticeships for employers

The reality is, not every college graduate is equipped with the right skills needed to succeed in the real world. Whether it’s soft skills, technical skills, communication skills, or the ability work with a diverse workforce that spans across generations. When an employer hires an apprentice, they are dedicated to providing further on-the-job training, while being able to mold the employee to fit their needs. While that seems to benefit the job seeker, it also benefits the employer, because it helps them create a pipeline of talent that could eventually be hired into a full-time role. If hired, these college grads are already familiar with the company, business, products, services, clients, and colleagues. They can move right into a full-time role, saving time on training and reducing time spent recruiting.

“Businesses gain by having an on-boarding pathway to find stellar graduates who can offer up their gifts and talents to help an organization succeed,” says Elmore. “Millennials are the largest generation in the workplace and those organizations who can succeed in leading them well will have the upper hand. Apprenticeships literally give an organization a chance to observe a new, young professional at little cost.”

Want more information on apprenticeships? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted September 12, 2016 by

Are your interns valuable contributors or low-priority grunts?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

Let’s be blunt here: a bad, or poorly-contextualized, hiring process can cost you lots of money and time. As a result, internal recruitment (essentially promotion from within or adjustment of roles) has gained some favor in recent years.

One of the best ways to approach internal recruitment is how you handle interns. An organization’s approach to interns typically resides somewhere between these two extremes: (more…)