• Tips from EY campus recruiter to find jobs for new graduates

    August 29, 2017 by

     

    If you are beginning your last year of college, don’t put off the job search. Looking for a job can easily start to feel like a full-time job itself. Luckily, there are things you can do that fold into your daily or weekly lives that will help you land a job by the time you graduate.

    We spoke with Jill Wilson, who is part of EY’s U.S. Campus Recruiting team. She has some concrete tips for seniors to take this coming year in bite sizes, so you can find a job that you love without having to panic. This is part two of our conversation. Last week we discussed why it’s a bad idea to wait until April to start your job search, and what are the big items that seniors should check off during the year to land a job they love. Continue Reading

  • Tips from expert recruiters: the best elevator pitch and how much time to spend networking

    August 28, 2017 by

     

    Networking is part of the job search, like it or not. For entry level job seekers, it’s important to practice a simple introduction that lets people know who you are and who you want to be, so they know how to help you. I met with two recruiting experts who gave their advice for the best elevator pitch, and plenty more tips for students and grads to network and build their personal brand.

    Toni Newborn, J.D., is the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at the City of Saint Paul; and Jeff Dunn is the Campus Relations Manager at Intel. Newborn and Dunn are part of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts. Continue Reading

  • Recent graduate jobs are harder to find at the last minute: Job search tips from EY for seniors [interview]

    August 22, 2017 by

     

    If you’re starting your last year of college, you probably have about 8-9 months until you’d like to be gainfully employed, and not just doing anything to pay your grown-up bills, but at an entry level job that will launch you into a great career.

    We spoke with Jill Wilson, who is part of EY’s U.S. Campus Recruiting team and has tons of advice for finding recent graduate jobs. She has some concrete tips for seniors to take this coming year in bite sizes, so you can find a job that you love without having to panic. This is part one of our conversation, and we touch on why it’s a bad idea to wait until April to start your job search, and what are the big items that seniors should check off during the year to land a job they love. In part two we discuss the little things seniors can incorporate into their daily or weekly lives to further the job search.

    Watch our conversation here, or read the takeaways in the blog below:

    Continue Reading

  • “Brand yourself” sounds intimidating. Two recruiting experts discuss how and why job seekers should care.

    August 21, 2017 by

     

    For students and grads looking for a job, we cannot underestimate the importance of networking. You’ve heard that advice before. However, if you don’t build your personal brand before or as you build your network, you could meet with a million people and still get nowhere in your job search.

    I caught up with two recruiting experts on our Panel of Experts who offered their advice for entry level job seekers. Toni Newborn, J.D., the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at the City of Saint Paul; and Jeff Dunn, the Campus Relations Manager at Intel, weighed in on how to “brand yourself.” Continue Reading

  • College Recruiter is a featured presenter in the Grad CareerFestival designed to help unemployed grads land jobs quicker

    July 10, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (July 10, 2017)–Grad Career/Festival is scheduled for July 27th– July 29th from 11 am – 10 pm daily (EDT). This event seeks to help college grads land a job 2.4 months more quickly! 33 hours of career advice!

    It takes over 7 months for average grad to find employment

    With nearly two million students graduating from college in May and June, it’s not surprising that it will take the average graduate 7.4 months to find employment.   While some of that time is a result of the economy not being able to absorb so many graduates at one time, much of it is a result of the fact that unemployed graduates simply do not simply how to look for a job.

    According to Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “Research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers has shown nearly 62 percent of graduating seniors either NEVER go to the career center, or will only visit once or twice.  It’s no wonder then that the average grad thinks the proper way to look for a job is to load their resume onto 100 websites and wait for someone to contact them!   We know, given the right knowledge and skills we can help an unemployed graduate find a job quicker.”

    Each author is offering three tips based on their niche area of expertise.  Graduates will learn relevant, contemporary strategies to create an elevator pitch, build their online brand, use social media to land a job, as well as learn traditional networking, resume, interviewing, and job search techniques.  Authors will share the importance of creating a career plan, managing their career, and staying current on job search strategies.   The authors will follow the TED Talk recommended presentation length which will provide graduates additional time to pose questions to authors.

    Event gives grads tools to improve resumes and skills in interviewing, networking and job search

    During each author’s presentation, time has been set aside to introduce graduates to innovative online career tools designed to improve their resumes, as well as their interviewing, networking and job search skills.  According to Rothberg, “Our firm and staff are concerned that college graduates are not receiving the knowledge and skills they will need for the dozen job searches they are expected to have by the time they turn 38 years old.   We are excited about the possibilities of putting thousands of dollars in the pockets of graduates by giving them simple insights on how they can not only find a job quicker, but help them launch and lead successful careers!”

    The cost to participate is only $33, but free to anyone who uses the authors promotion code of — CT –. Participation is limited!

    About Grad CareerFestival

    The Grad CareerFestival is produced by TalentMarks, a nationally recognized firm that provides scalable career and professional development programming to career centers, and alumni associations.   http://www.gradcareerfestival.com

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Each year, we help almost three million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities find seasonal, part-time, internship, and other entry-level jobs. College Recruiter is free to candidates as employers pay to advertise their job openings with us. At any given time, we have about 300,000 job postings and well over 40,000 pages of articles, blogs, videos, and other career-related content.  

    For details and interviews, contact [email protected]   800-849-1762 x 205

  • 10 secrets to success for recent college grads pursuing nursing careers

    March 07, 2017 by

    Compassion, patience. A willingness to help. A desire to continually learn. Those are all important traits of a successful nurse, say Dr. Kim Hudson-Gallogly, head of the University of North Georgia’s Department of Nursing.

    “The medical field is constantly growing and changing,” says Hudson-Gallogly. And recent college grads pursuing a career in nursing or nursing jobs must be prepared to adapt now, and in their future. Especially when it comes to landing that entry-level nursing job.

    Those pursuing entry-level nursing careers should “try and expose yourself to many different areas of nursing so that you can know where your interests truly lie,” says Hudson-Gallogly. “That way, you can have at least a couple of areas you would like to work in, in case your first choice is not available.”

    According to the American Nursing Association “Nursing is the protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, facilitation of healing, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations.”

    To succeed in a nursing career, college students and recent college grads pursuing nursing careers need excellent people skills with the ability to listen, observe, and communicate with others, says Rhonda Bell, Dean of Health Sciences at San Jacinto College North.

    “A nurse is a team member in an ever changing dynamic health care system,” says Bell. “He or she must have the ability to work as a part of a multi-disciplinary team in order to achieve the best outcomes for the patient and family receiving care.”

    Nursing can be a stressful career, says Bell. But also rewarding. A nurse must be able to manage stress and deal with emotional situations, as well be flexible and adaptable on short notice. What it comes down to is, a nurse must have a passion for caring for others, says Bell.

    Nurses are taught to be unbiased and non-judgmental when caring for all cultures, ethnicities, socio-economic groups, genders and age groups, says Dr. Janet Mahoney, Dean of the Marjorie K. Unterberg School of Nursing and Health Studies at Monmouth University.

    “The profession is guided by the code of ethics,” says Mahoney. “Nursing is a highly respected profession and one that the public highly regards as one of the most trustworthy.”

    Nurses portray calmness in a sea of chaos, adds Mahoney. As new nurses join the field, they quickly learn how to multitask and delegate appropriately. Each patient’s care experience brings nurses to a new level of knowledge, competency, and confidence. Each experience builds on the other to form a firm foundation.

    What are some other skills and traits of a successful nurse? What does it take for current college students and recent college grads to succeed in a nursing career? Nursing industry educators and leaders provide these 10 secrets to success for recent college grads pursuing nursing careers:

    Continue Reading

  • The pros and cons of video resumes

    December 13, 2016 by

    Are you a recent college grad looking to get ahead of the competition by creating a video resume? Be cautious before thinking a video resume is the golden ticket to landing an interview, or getting a job.

    That’s because even in today’s digital world, success on the job hunt still often depends heavily on an old-school document, according to The Creative Group (TCG), a company that specializes in connecting interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations talent with the best companies on a project, contract-to-hire, and full-time basis.

    Nearly eight in 10 executives surveyed by TCG said they prefer receiving traditional resumes in Word or PDF format over video or infographic resumes. Some employers won’t even accept video resumes and in the TCG survey, released in May of 2016, only three percent of executives indicated they prefer video resumes over traditional resumes.

    That’s no surprise to Tom Thomson, managing partner of Sanford Rose Associates, a recruitment firm in Nashville. “The recruiters I discussed this with do not want video resumes,” says Thomson. Here is why, he says:

    • Recruiters and hiring managers see these as highly produced marketing pieces.
    • Most people are not comfortable or feel natural in front of a camera. “You may not want this to be the first impression a potential employer has of you,” says Thomson.
    • It can easily be used to discriminate against highly qualified candidates based on their appearance.

    Arlene Vernon, a Twin Cities-based HR consultant, agrees. “When you see the person on a video, there’s an increased risk of discrimination from a legal perspective, because you can see race/ethnicity before you get to hear about their skills/background.”

    Time is also a drawback of video resumes.

    “I can scan a resume to see whether I like the candidate in five to ten seconds,” says Vernon. “I don’t have time to watch a video. I might do it after seeing a resume I’m interested in, to learn more about the person, and see their presentation skills. But I don’t think the convenience of a ‘paper’ resume will disappear.”

    That being said, there are instances when a video resume may be requested, or used to help stand out from the competition, says Diane Domeyer, executive director of The Creative Group.

    “If you’re applying for a job that requires multimedia or presentation skills, a short, one minute video resume that highlights key skills and accomplishments can be effective and set you apart from the competition,” says Domeyer. “If you have creative skills, you can even put together an animated short about why you’d make a good addition to the team. That said, always have a traditional resume ready in case one is requested.”

    According to the team at SparkHire, a company that provides video interviewing, resume and technology solutions: “Video resumes are a way for candidates to go beyond traditional methods of applying, such as submitting only a resume, cover letter, and work samples. Lasting typically 60 seconds, these videos are your shot to make the best first impression to an employer. A video resume lets the employer literally see you and hear your case (via your communication skills, personality and charisma) as the best candidate for the job – all before the interview takes place.”

    When to use a video resume

    Before you make a video resume and hit the upload button, think carefully about whether it will help or hurt your chances of getting a job interview, says the experts from Robert Half Technology. Professionals in the following industries are likely to see the most success with a video resume:

    • Marketing, advertising and public relations: If you’re applying for a job that requires killer presentation skills, a video resume can help you show off your abilities and professional polish.
    • Public speaking: When applying for jobs that require a lot of public speaking — for example, in sales or training — you can use a video resume not only to introduce yourself but also to include clips of yourself in action.
    • Multimedia: For professionals who create multimedia content, a video resume can be one more way to demonstrate your editing or motion graphics skills.
    • Broadcast: Candidates for jobs as newscasters, television hosts or film professionals have long used video show reels, mailing out old-school VHS tapes of their best clips years before the Internet came along. If this is your field, consider starting your show reel with a video resume to introduce yourself.

    When to avoid video resumes

    Of course, there are times when it’s best to stick to a traditional resume, according to Robert Half Technology:

    • You’re not comfortable on camera: People who are shy may want to reconsider a video resume. One big goal of this format is to show employers your personality. If you tend to get nervous or clam up as soon as a camera turns on, you obviously won’t achieve this objective.
    • The employer asks for a standard resume: A job posting might have a very specific application process, for example, or require job candidates to paste their resumes and cover letters in an online form.
    • A video resume won’t help you sell yourself: For many job seekers, a video resume simply won’t add much value. If you’re applying for a position as an accountant, for instance, employers will probably find it easier and more convenient to review your skills and work experience on paper (or, in a PDF or Word document, to be more accurate).
    • You prefer to remain private: Even though it’s possible to make your video private, you’re still putting details of your life on the Internet, and there’s a chance your video resume gets wider distribution than you anticipated. As always, make sure that what you post is something you won’t later regret.

    There are pros and cons of video resumes. Recent college grads should be careful when creating one, and make sure it’s right for your industry or job application before sending one.

    Are you ready to take your job search to the next level? Register with College Recruiter to get the latest jobs emailed to you! And don’t forget to follow us on TwitterLinkedInFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Ask Matt: How recent college grads can benefit from joining professional associations

    November 18, 2016 by

    Networking2Dear Matt: I’m a recent college graduate who is seeking opportunities to grow and network within my field. I’ve always heard that professional associations are beneficial. Why should recent college grads join professional/industry associations?

    Matt: Joining an industry-related association or trade organization, or young professionals networking organization, are great ways for recent college graduates to network, meet other like-minded professionals, and learn. Many recent college grads have met professionals who have become future co-workers, managers, and even friends, through associations or various professional networking organizations.

    But meeting people and making contacts and friends are only a small reason why joining industry associations are highly recommended for college students and recent college grads.

    “Recent graduates benefit immensely from joining professional associations – and there’s much more to it than networking for job opportunities or brushing up on your interviewing skills,” says Richard Baseil, executive director of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the world’s premier association for signal processing engineers and industry professionals.

    Joining professional associations allows college students and recent college graduates to stay on top of industry trends, learn about volunteer or leadership opportunities, and enables project collaboration. For example, IEEE’s Signal Processing Society offers current students and recent graduates exclusive member benefits including continuing education, substantial discounts on various technical and industry resources, and career recognition through scholarships and awards.  And, since most employees do not stay with a single employer through their career, an association such as IEEE can act as a stable “home base” as members seek other opportunities.

    Employers like employees who step outside their comfort zone Continue Reading

  • Affinity groups: value to employee and employer

    October 26, 2016 by

    Group of different birdsAt a recent People of Color Job Fair, employers touted their welcoming workplaces. Many referred to their affinity groups as how they are inclusive of diversity. If offered genuinely, affinity groups can bring value to both the employee and the employer.

    Value to employees

    1. Take a rest from the code-switching. It can be lonely working in an office full of people who don’t look like you. Code-switching all day can be exhausting. (For those less familiar, “code-switching” is a daily practice for people who navigate two cultures. They adjust their dialect/language/mannerisms to fit into the surrounding culture without being questioned. NPR has a nice illustration of code-switching.) Affinity groups can offer relief for anyone who needs a space where it feels safer to express yourself freely. Groups are meant to bring people together who share a common interest or culture. Examples are veterans, women, African Americans and GLBT affinity groups. It’s about solidarity (“Why Women’s Spaces Matter”).
    2. Build your network. In your affinity group, you will probably find yourself networking with colleagues outside your immediate team. This can be helpful to your career. Especially for entry-level and younger employees, more experienced colleagues can give you advice and point you to resources.
    3. Build new skills. You don’t have to wait for a formal company training to learn new skills. Informal group discussions offer excellent opportunities to learn new tools, technology or best practices that can make you more effective and valuable at your company.

    Value to employer

    1. Boost retention of employees. Engagement is king. For those who claim that affinity groups look more like segregation than inclusion, consider how relieving it can feel for an employee to join an affinity group and feel at home with other colleagues who “get them.” That employee, in turn, may feel more positive about her work, thus stick around longer. In addition, group members can collaborate with management to discuss issues of recruitment and retention, and shed light on how to improve your practices. In this example, GLBT employees helped shape their organization’s benefit policy for domestic partnerships, making them more competitive.
    2. Get new consumer insights. Affinity groups can collaborate with management to discuss marketing solutions for consumers from their own community.
    3. Low-cost learning and development. Affinity group members share resources with each other, best practices, and new tools and technology. This no-cost informal learning is a nice supplement to expensive formal company training.
    4. Reap the benefits of diversity. Multiple studies point to the increased productivity and profits of diverse companies. However, if your work environment isn’t inclusive, these benefits remain out of reach. If managed well, affinity groups can be part of your inclusion strategy.

    Doing it right

    1. You can’t force affinity groups. They must be employee-led, and membership can’t be forced. If employees feel that the group has been too packaged without their input, you lose their buy-in and engagement.
    2. Give it time. The longer your organization has affinity groups, the more likely you will be able to align them to business goals.

    Veteran’s Day is November 11! Here are a few companies who have created affinity groups for veteransWant to keep up on the latest career and job search tips and trends for recent college grads? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connecting with us on LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Ask Matt: Recent college grads shouldn’t let helicopter parents hinder their job search

    October 12, 2016 by
    Helicopter parents in the job search; Tips for recent college grads

    Photo from StockUnlimited.com

    Dear Matt: I’m responsible for hiring entry-level employees for a large company, and I am amazed at how many recent college grads have their parents reaching out to us on behalf of their children – they even show up at interviews! I thought helicopter parents were only involved at the youth and high school level. But we’re now seeing it in the business world. Can you remind your readers and all recent college grads that parental involvement shouldn’t take place in the workplace?

    Matt: By one definition, a helicopter parent is a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child’s or children’s experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Helicopter parents are also prevalent at the youth and high school level, often hovering over their children and every decision involving those children at youth or high school activities, in school, or with friends.

    And now, helicopter parents are invading the workplace. Yikes! It’s true.

    “Believe it or not, recruiters and hiring managers are seeing a surprising influx of parental involvement in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process,” says Brandi Britton, district president for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. “As a staffing firm, we’ve heard our share of helicopter parent stories and experienced some unique situations with moms and dads ourselves.”

    Today’s working parent can be a great resource for that recent college grad seeking job search advice, or with connecting them to members of their professional network. But they shouldn’t accompany their child to job interviews, contact employers on behalf of their child, or listen in on speaker phone or Skype/Facetime during the interview. Those are all things that are happening today and all things recent college grads should be sure to avoid to land that first job, or move forward in their career.

    According to a survey of 608 senior managers by Office Team, 35 percent of senior managers interviewed said they find it annoying when helicopter parents are involved in their kids’ search for work. Another one-third (34 percent) of respondents prefer mom and dad stay out of the job hunt, but would let it slide. Only 29 percent said this parental guidance is not a problem.

    The reasons for mom and dad getting involved are simple, says Britton: Recent college grads may not have as much job search experience and therefore turn to their parents for guidance.

    “The job search process can be extremely challenging and daunting,” says Britton. “Parental support and advice throughout the process can help you stay positive and on track.”

    But…

    “Although most parents mean well with their efforts, they need to know where to draw the line to avoid hurting their son or daughter’s chances of securing a job,” says Britton

    Managers were also asked to recount the most unusual or surprising behavior they’ve heard of or seen from helicopter parents of job seekers. Here are some of their responses:

    • “The candidate opened his laptop and had his mother Skype in for the interview.”
    • “A woman brought a cake to try to convince us to hire her daughter.”
    • “One parent asked if she could do the interview for her child because he had somewhere else to be.”
    • “A father asked us to pay his son a higher salary.”
    • “One mom knocked on the office door during an interview and asked if she could sit in.”
    • “Parents have arrived with their child’s resume and tried to convince us to hire him or her.”
    • “A job seeker was texting his parent the questions I was asking during the interview and waiting for a response.”
    • “Once a father called us pretending he was from the candidate’s previous company and offered praise for his son.”
    • “Parents have followed up to ask how their child’s interview went.”
    • “A father started filling out a job application on behalf of his kid.”
    • “I had one mother call and set up an interview for her son.”
    • “Moms and dads have called to ask why their child didn’t get hired.”

    When it comes to parental involvement in the job search, Britton provided the five biggest mistakes college grads make when involving parents in the job search:

    1. Parents should avoid direct contact with potential employers. They should not participate in interviews or call, email or visit companies on behalf of their children.
    2. Job seekers should be the ones filling out the applications and submitting resumes, not their parents.
    3. Helicopter parents should steer clear of involvement in following up after their child has applied or interviewed for a position.
    4. Having your mom or dad try to bribe a potential employer is a definite no-no. In our survey, one woman brought a cake to a company to try to convince them to hire her daughter.
    5. Parents shouldn’t be involved in job offer discussions, such as negotiating salary or benefits.

    “Parents should absolutely not be included in their children’s job interviews,” says Britton. “The meeting is meant to be a discussion involving only the interviewer(s) and job candidate. “Parents participating in interviews can distract from the goal of making sure it’s a fit for the applicant and employer. The employer is evaluating whether to hire the applicant — not his or her parent.”

    Employers usually appreciate candidates who are assertive, but when a parent is clearly handholding or answering questions for their child, it sends the message that the individual lacks initiative and independence, adds Britton.

    Does this automatically eliminate a candidate?

    “Not all employers will automatically take a candidate out of contention if his or her parents become too involved in the job search, but chances are that most hiring managers would be put off by this type of behavior,” says Britton. “Parents who become overly involved in their children’s job searches can cause more harm than good because employers may question the applicant’s abilities and maturity.”

    Professionals need to take ownership of their careers – they’re responsible for applying to and ultimately landing positions. So how can parents assist recent college grads in the job search? Britton offered these additional tips on how parents can assist recent college grads in the job search:

    1. Uncovering hidden job opportunities: Family members and others in your network can be great sources for advice and help you uncover hidden job opportunities.
    2. Job search and interview preparation: It’s perfectly fine to tap your parents for behind-the-scenes assistance, such as reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews or offering networking contacts.
    3. Access to professional contacts: Parents or those in their network can provide access to contacts at companies or alert you to opportunities.
    4. Resume and cover letter review: Have your mom or dad review your resume and cover letter to ensure they’re error-free and clearly showcase the most important information.
    5. Mock interview assistance: Prepare for interviews by practicing responses to common (and tricky) questions with your parents. They can also provide constructive criticism regarding your answers and delivery.
    6. Decision-making: Juggling a few offers? Children may want to get their parents’ opinions when weighing potential opportunities. But ultimately, it’s the job seekers decision, not the parents.

    “Parents want the best for their kids, but being overly involved in a child’s job search can cause more harm than good,” says Britton. “It’s a positive for mom and dad to help behind the scenes by reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews and offering networking contacts. However, ultimately, companies seek employees who display self-sufficiency and maturity.”

    Want more tips and advice on how to successfully navigate the job search? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

    Matt Krumrie

    Matt Krumrie

    About Ask Matt on CollegeRecruiter.com
    Ask Matt is a new monthly career advice column that offers tips and advice to recent college grads and entry-level job seekers. Have a question? Need job search or career advice? Email your question to Matt Krumrie for use in a future column.