• Redefining the role of the college and university relations recruiter

    March 19, 2018 by

    Recruiting and advertising for open positions has changed. Before industrialization, virtually every place of employment was a solo or small operation. Without power, it was difficult to scale anything. All of a sudden with electricity, you could have factories with production lines. Employers needed to quickly go from having a couple people working in their facility to maybe even hundreds or thousands.

    Advertising for jobs nowadays is mostly done through social media, networking, and employee referrals. When you only need to hire a few people, chances are you already know them. In that case, no advertising is needed. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, explains that if you now have to suddenly start hiring dozens, hundreds or thousands, it’s very unlikely that you’re going to know enough people to fill those positions. Rothberg recently presented “Redefining the Role of the College and University Relations Recruiter,” and we share his takeaways here.   Continue Reading

  • Hiring for commission-based roles: What to consider

    March 15, 2018 by

     

    If you are hiring for commission-based roles, you have probably encountered misconceptions about commission-based employment, especially among entry-level candidates. Good candidates for these roles possess different characteristics than those who you might consider for a non-commission role. Here I get into how to address those misconceptions, how to identify great candidates and how to set new hires up for success in a commission-based role. Continue Reading

  • Entry-level job seekers can help fight sexual harassment: Tips to keep the pressure on employers

    January 30, 2018 by

     

    Seemingly countless allegations have popped up in the news related to sexual harassment. From engineers and athletes to actors and business leaders, the collection of stories demonstrate an unbalanced power dynamic across industries. As you search for jobs, how do you know whether an organization is a respectful place to work? And in addition to simply avoiding dangerous workplaces, how can you be a part of the solution as an entry-level job seeker or employee to fight sexual harassment in the workplace?

    We spoke to Vicky Oliver, author of 301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions (Sourcebooks, 2005) and Bad Bosses, Crazy Coworkers and Other Office Idiots (Sourcebooks, 2008), and to Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter. Together they have decades of experience advising young professionals and championing solutions to difficult recruitment challenges. Continue Reading

  • What to say at a career fair, and more preparation tips

    January 23, 2018 by

     

    If your school hosts a career fair, don’t miss out. Not attending is a missed opportunity to advance your job search. We heard from three experts with years of experience advising and recruiting college students, and they shared deep insight into what impresses recruiters today, including what to say at a career fair, what to wear, the right attitude and what to do after the event. Continue Reading

  • What to do in an interview, and 7 things NOT to do

    November 28, 2017 by

     

    Entry-level job seekers, if you are invited to a job interview, you’ll definitely want to prepare. We have lots of advice on the College Recruiter blog about what to do in an interview, what to say, and how to dress, but today we will go further and discuss what not do as well. Vicky Oliver, author of “301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions” and other bestselling career books, has advice to avoid blowing your chance at the job. Here are seven things you should avoid: Continue Reading

  • How and when technology can help reduce hidden bias in hiring

    September 12, 2017 by

     

    Technology can help facilitate the awareness of hidden bias, but the tools themselves are not the solution. We spoke with two talent acquisition and workforce planning experts to discuss recruitment technology. Our conversation went far beyond the tools available for recruiters.

    Bruce Soltys is the Head of Talent Acquisition Sourcing Strategies at Travelers, and Janine Truitt is the Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations. They are both members of our Panel of Experts.

    Watch our discussion here, or read the takeaways in the blog below. 
    Continue Reading

  • College Recruiter is a featured presenter in the Grad CareerFestival designed to help unemployed grads land jobs quicker

    July 10, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (July 10, 2017)–Grad Career/Festival is scheduled for July 27th– July 29th from 11 am – 10 pm daily (EDT). This event seeks to help college grads land a job 2.4 months more quickly! 33 hours of career advice!

    It takes over 7 months for average grad to find employment

    With nearly two million students graduating from college in May and June, it’s not surprising that it will take the average graduate 7.4 months to find employment.   While some of that time is a result of the economy not being able to absorb so many graduates at one time, much of it is a result of the fact that unemployed graduates simply do not simply how to look for a job.

    According to Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “Research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers has shown nearly 62 percent of graduating seniors either NEVER go to the career center, or will only visit once or twice.  It’s no wonder then that the average grad thinks the proper way to look for a job is to load their resume onto 100 websites and wait for someone to contact them!   We know, given the right knowledge and skills we can help an unemployed graduate find a job quicker.”

    Each author is offering three tips based on their niche area of expertise.  Graduates will learn relevant, contemporary strategies to create an elevator pitch, build their online brand, use social media to land a job, as well as learn traditional networking, resume, interviewing, and job search techniques.  Authors will share the importance of creating a career plan, managing their career, and staying current on job search strategies.   The authors will follow the TED Talk recommended presentation length which will provide graduates additional time to pose questions to authors.

    Event gives grads tools to improve resumes and skills in interviewing, networking and job search

    During each author’s presentation, time has been set aside to introduce graduates to innovative online career tools designed to improve their resumes, as well as their interviewing, networking and job search skills.  According to Rothberg, “Our firm and staff are concerned that college graduates are not receiving the knowledge and skills they will need for the dozen job searches they are expected to have by the time they turn 38 years old.   We are excited about the possibilities of putting thousands of dollars in the pockets of graduates by giving them simple insights on how they can not only find a job quicker, but help them launch and lead successful careers!”

    The cost to participate is only $33, but free to anyone who uses the authors promotion code of — CT –. Participation is limited!

    About Grad CareerFestival

    The Grad CareerFestival is produced by TalentMarks, a nationally recognized firm that provides scalable career and professional development programming to career centers, and alumni associations.   http://www.gradcareerfestival.com

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Each year, we help almost three million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities find seasonal, part-time, internship, and other entry-level jobs. College Recruiter is free to candidates as employers pay to advertise their job openings with us. At any given time, we have about 300,000 job postings and well over 40,000 pages of articles, blogs, videos, and other career-related content.  

    For details and interviews, contact [email protected]   800-849-1762 x 205

  • [Video and infographic] Preparing for an engineering interview: Insight from Intel for female students and grads

    July 06, 2017 by

     

    How are you supposed to know how to stand out from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice regarding preparing for an interview, specifically for female engineer students who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 2 of 2 of our conversation. Last time we checked in with Jeff, he shared tips for engineering students who are preparing their resume.

    Jeff is a member of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is a group of professional around the country that regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers. Continue Reading

  • Video interviewing: best practices for employers [interview]

    June 05, 2017 by

     

    Recruiters who spend precious time on the time-consuming administrative task of scheduling telephone interviews should seriously be looking at video interview software. College Recruiter recently spoke with Martin Edmondson, CEO of Gradcore, about the trend in asynchronous video interviewing. Gradcore helps employers understand colleges and their graduates, and they help the graduates understand potential employers. Edmondson, a member of College Recruiter’s  Panel of Experts, provides tips for employers who are considering using video in their interview and hiring process. He has seen this trend on the rise and believes employers can save time and otherwise benefit by implementing video interviews.

    Watch our discussion below or read major takeaways in the blog post the follows.

     

    More employers are conducting video interviews to save time.

    More employers are using video interviews, and the opposite trend is true for telephone interviews. Edmondson says he is “seeing a big growth, especially in UK and Europe, around asynchronous video, particularly that second phase of the interview that replaces telephone interviews.”

    In fact, a recent survey by the Association of Graduate Recruiters (the national body in the UK for student and graduate recruitment), showed that in the last year alone usage has gone from 29% to 43% of graduate recruiters using video interviews as a selection tool.

    They are not meant to be the first or final stage of interviewing. A video interview should be used in the middle of the process, especially for employers who have high volume of student or grad recruitment. A video can give a good picture of a candidate at that stage.

    Video interviewing saves time and is a trend

    Source: AGR Annual Survey 2016

    Edmondson adds, “There isa wide range of providers of asynchronous video interviews out there. Many of them carry the same functionality, but with the intense competition in the field there is a constant flow of innovation to improve the technology. The initial battle for market share led to low pricing,  but there is growing differentiation in product and pricing.”

    Pros and cons of an asynchronous video interview

    First, the pros. An asynchronous video brings the advantage of efficiency, much greater flexibility for both the candidate and the recruiter, and it cuts down the overall process time. This improves candidate experience and saves time and money for the recruiter.  In addition, Edmondson adds, “video interviews are really useful for multinational organizations recruiting internationally.”


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    “They are best deployed when looking to reduce a large pool of applicants down in a short space of time whilst still using a robust process.” In the middle stage of the process, when  you still have a big pot of candidates to get through, an asynchronous video interview gives you pretty good picture of someone without being too time consuming.

    Recruiters are used to using telephone interviews, where they can lose days just scheduling them. However, with an asynchronous video interview, you “literally just get your question into the system, send it off to 500 or 1,000 graduates, and you give them 48 hours to respond. They come back with their responses that they film themselves. You can then send it out to the recruitment team to review. So it’s very efficient.”

    Edmondson says there is one disadvantage. “They have some drawbacks in comparison to telephone interviews as they don’t allow as much drilling into answers, but the other benefits tend to outweigh this.” That’s why he says it’s meant for  a middle stage, not a final interview. The quality of results from video interviews, adds Edmondson, “as with telephone interviews, is down to the quality and experience of the assessors rather than the medium.”

    How video interviews impact bias in the hiring process

    Seeing a candidate's face can increase biasAn asynchronous video can, on one hand, reduce bias because it is structured and remains a standard in the hiring process that is unchanged for every candidate, as opposed to the bias that is introduced by “winging it” with small talk, for example. On the other hand, introducing a video in the middle of the hiring process may introduce new bias because now the recruiter can see the candidate’s face.

    Related: Predictive analytics and interview bias

    “Bias is in the hands of the person watching the video,” says Edmondson. “If you’ve got well-trained recruiters watching, who are conscious of bias, then you shouldn’t have a problem. If you distribute it to managers who aren’t as well trained in bias, then you may have some more issues.” That is to say, it is the organization’s responsibility to manage and control bias more generally in their interview process, be that through video interviews, face to face interviews or any other form.

    “When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

    To control for bias, the video interview offers another advantage in that they are recorded. “So if you have a concern or if a candidate raised a concern, you can just go back and rewatch it to see if the candidate was reviewed fairly.”

    Considerations while reviewing a video interview

    “When reviewing video interviews you should use the same fair and robust principles you apply in any interview or assessment center context. You should ideally use assessors with an experience and a clear understanding of bias, and score consistently with clear behavioral indicators.”

    Another consideration is background interruptions, and recruiters may decide to expect some level of interruptions as just par for the course. “The flexibility of the medium allows them to record day and night, but does mean you sometimes get unexpected interruptions from a friend or parent inadvertently appearing in the back of shot.”

    Videos allow interviewers to take into account how the candidate is communicating. However, Edmondson warns of coming advancements in assessing communication. Video interviews may soon be subject to assessing candidates using biometrics, facial expressions, “but for me,” adds Edmondson, “that gets slightly dangerous” and needs more exploration.

    Finally, Edmondson advises that employers considers cultural differences if their organizations operate in multiple countries. There are lot of different suppliers out there, so get a feel for the demos. It’s possible that videos may not be considered totally appropriate in certain areas. If that’s the case, consider not using them at all, or introducing them gradually. If certain candidates can’t access he media for any reason, you have to work around that too.

    Video interviews shouldn’t be used in isolation, and are really at their best in the mid stages of a large scale selection process.

     

  • Ask Matt: How to respond to the 5 most basic interview questions [video]

    May 11, 2017 by

     

    Dear Matt: I recently completed an interview, and realized, I wasn’t prepared to answer the most basic interview questions. I spent more time preparing for that odd, or unique question that may come up, and not enough time on the basics. What are some answers or responses to the most basic interview questions every recent job seeker should be sure to master before the next interview?  Continue Reading