ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How the CIA uses productivity data to win support for its D&I programs

Most of Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire dozens or even hundreds have diversity and inclusion programs because their talent acquisition and other human resource leaders know that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce.

But many and perhaps most of these TA and HR leaders struggle to get the resources they need for their D&I programs. Why? Because these TA and HR leaders have not been able to win support for these programs from their CEO, CFO, and other C-suite executives.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our closing keynote presenter was Roynda Hartsfield, former Chief of Hiring for the CIA’s Directorate of Digital Innovations (DDI) and current Head of Talent Acquisition for Excel Technologies, LLC. Roy wowed the 125 people in the room plus the hundreds watching the livestream as she walked through how she and other members of her team at the CIA first used data to demonstrate to its C-suite how their most diverse and inclusive teams were also their most productive teams and then won the resources to make the CIA’s diversity and inclusion efforts even stronger.

After her presentation, Roy was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Gerry Crispin, Principal and Co-Founder for CareerXroads and Co-Founder of TalentBoard.org, which works to improve the candidate experience by defining, measuring, and improving the treatment of job candidates;
  • Ankit Somani, Co-Founder for AllyO;
  • Marjorie McCamey, Corporate Development for intrnz and Corporate Recruiter for Franklin Templeton.

Are you struggling to win the resources you need from your C-suite? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How to recruit employees with Asperger’s Syndrome

Conferences can be tremendous opportunities to learn, but too many conferences cover the same topics over and over and over again and sometimes it is even the same presentation by the same speaker. But not always. Sometimes, the topic is new to the attendees, or presented in a markedly different manner.  

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our featured presenter was Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants. Jo shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how and why leading employers are reaching out to candidates with Asperger’s Syndrome not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes business sense to do it.

After her presentation, Jo was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Keca Ward, Senior Director of Talent Acquisition for Phenom People;
  • Jon Kestenbaum, Executive Director of Talent Tech Labs;
  • Janine Truitt, Member of College Recruiter’s content expert board and Chief Innovations Officer for Talent Think Innovations; and
  • Lois Barth, Principal and Human Development Expert for Lois Barth Coaching & Consulting Services.

Are you debating whether to recruit people with Asperger’s or struggling to retain them? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates, including those with Asperger’s? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How EY built a better workforce through diversity and inclusion

One of the nice things about attending conferences is the opportunity to learn from experts.

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our opening keynote speaker was Ken Bouyer, Americas Director for Inclusiveness Recruiting for Ernst & Young. Ken shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how EY built a better workforce through gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, and generational diversity and inclusion.

After his presentation, Ken was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Dawn Carter, Director, Global University Recruiting for Uber;
  • Kimberly Jones, former talent acquisition leader for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, GE Aviation, Raytheon, Honda, and Nationwide and currently CEO of Kelton Legend;
  • Pam Baker, Member of College Recruiter’s Content Expert Board and Founder and CEO for Journeous; and
  • Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants.

Are you struggling to improve your diversity and inclusion efforts? Who isn’t? Watch the one-hour video of the presentation and panel discussion:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

Why should we care about diversity and inclusion?

Employers all claim — and most of them mean it — that they want to hire the best person for the job. At College Recruiter, we call that putting the right person in the right seat.

No one would dispute that an employer should hire the best person for the job, but reasonable people often differ as to how to determine who is the best person. If you’re hiring a salesperson, is the best person the candidate who has already demonstrated their ability to sell your kind of product to your existing customer base? Or is it the person who seems to have the most potential to sell the most to your existing customer base but who has not yet demonstrated that ability? Could it be the person who is most likely to sell your product to an entirely new customer group? Something else?

We recently discussed these issues at length at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference. We chose to spend the day with 125 talent acquisition leaders discussing why and how employers should diversify their college hires because so many of our customers use our targeted email and other products to reach out to underrepresented groups such as women, people of color, military veterans, people with disabilities, and more.  These leading employers know that the more diverse and inclusive their workforces, the more productive are those workforces.

Want to learn more about why we should care about diversity and inclusion? Watch the 15-minute video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Posted October 16, 2019 by

To hire students, you need to recruit on-campus. Right? Wrong.

At College Recruiter job search site, one of the biggest changes that we’ve seen over the past few years is the rapidly increasing number of employers who use time-to-hire, cost-per-hire, and productivity data to measure their sourcing partners, including college career service offices. Their findings are shocking to many.

For decades, employers believed that they had to travel to and recruit students on-campus if they wanted to hire “the best” candidates. Those beliefs were typically grounded on false assumptions. You’ve probably heard that productivity data shows that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce. But that means that an employer who only hires at a small percentage of the 3,000 four-year colleges and universities or the 4,400 one- and two-year colleges is undermining their own diversity and inclusion efforts. So the more targeted your campus recruiting efforts, the less diverse, inclusive, and productive will be your workforce. Ouch.

Another example? Many of our employer customers who have looked at their productivity data have discovered that the more elite the school the employee went to, the less productive is that employee. How can that be true? Because they leave far sooner than those hired from second or even third-tier schools. One of our long-time customers is an accounting and consulting company. They cut way back on their on-campus efforts in favor of hiring through what they call “virtual” sources like College Recruiter. Why? Diversity, inclusion, and productivity. They’re becoming school and even major agnostic, meaning they don’t really care what school you went to or even what your major was. They used to only consider accounting, economics, and finance majors. Now they embrace fine arts, Russian literature, and any other major. In their words, “we can teach an employee how to read a balance sheet but we can’t teach them how to think critically”.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted October 11, 2019 by

Why employers should offer 529 college savings and tuition reimbursement plans

The cost of higher education is exponentially higher for the Millennials who recently graduated and Gen Zers who are currently enrolled in one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities. A Baby Boomer may have paid $10,000 for tuition, room, and board in the 1960s. By the 1980s, the same would have cost a Gen Xer about $50,000. Today, the same will cost a Gen Zer $250,000. A very small percentage of students don’t face that kind of sticker shock as they’re extremely affluent and pay for that out-of-pocket, perhaps with savings, or they’re amongst those with the lowest income but qualify for the largest merit scholarships. For the vast majority of students, financing hundreds of thousands of dollars for their education is the reality. 

It is pretty common for student loans to carry interest rates of 6.25 percent, so about double what home mortgages cost, despite the student loans being of lower risk than home mortgages as you can’t discharge student loan debt through bankruptcy. Also normal is a 20-year repayment period. The cost of a $250,000 loan with an interest rate of 6.25 percent and a length of 20 years results in a monthly payment of $1,827.32, which is about $2,500 before tax. In other words, just to cover your student loans, you need to earn $30,000 a year. Even if your cost of education is half of that, you need to earn about $15,000 a year just to cover your student loans. 

Employers that create 529 education savings and tuition reimbursement plans effectively give their participating employees a substantial raise without it costing the employer anything. Money contributed to a 529 plan is tax-deductible, so if the employee contributes $10,000 a year, they’re going to save about $2,500 a year in taxes. That employee has therefore just effectively been given a $2,500 raise by their employer, without that raise costing the employer anything. Even more dramatic is tuition reimbursement, as that doesn’t cost the employee anything. At College Recruiter, we offer tuition reimbursement of $1,500 per year. If the employee’s tax bracket is 25 percent, that’s worth $2,000 to them. We are, effectively, giving those employees a $2,000 per year raise.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted October 04, 2019 by

How to convince your boss to let you work from home

All of College Recruiter’s employees work remotely from home-based offices, but that hasn’t always been the case. Before we moved to a fully work-from-home, distributed team model, only some of our employees worked from home. How did we decide who would work from home? Not only did the employee need to want to work from home, but we also needed to see that they had demonstrated an ability to work from home successfully. 

Some of our home-based employees had done so successfully for other employers. Others had not yet had that experience. For those who had not yet tried working from home, we started off by allowing them to work from home occasionally, such as a half a day or a day a week. If that went well, then they might work from home four days a week and be in the office a day a week. If that went well, then they’d start working from home all of the time and only coming into the office when in-person meetings were imperative, such as all-team meetings.

There were employees who wanted to work from home, whose home office seemed well suited to success (not just a desk in their bedroom), and who seemed to have the discipline and self-starter skill set that we found were necessary. Yet they floundered. Sometimes, pilots that everyone expects to succeed instead fail, including employees trying to work from home. 

Why did the work-from-home pilots fail? A variety of reasons, but the primary reason was the lack of a suitable workspace. One employee who had worked from home with great success bought a dog who barked non-stop unless sitting on the lap of our employee, which prevented her from being productive in her customer service job as she needed to be on the phone a lot. Another employee didn’t make childcare arrangements for his three young kids and so they interrupted him multiple times an hour with a variety of requests such as for snacks. 

Home-based employment can be a wonderful thing for both employee and employer, but those who have never worked from home may be surprised at how hard it is to do successfully.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted July 18, 2019 by

New, free job search engine for career service office and other sites from College Recruiter

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career.

About 2.5 million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities use our website a year to find part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs. They do so at no charge. Our revenues come from employers who pay to advertise the jobs with us. 

Do you have students who search your site but don’t find a lot of jobs which match their interests, perhaps because they grew up in another state and want to find a job back there? Just have your web developer drop this code onto your resource page or wherever your students would go to search for a job:


<!– begin iframe-board –>
<div class=”iframe-board”>
<iframe style=”width: 100%; height: 800px;” src=”https://cr.careersitecloud.com/” frameborder=”0″></iframe>
</div>
<!– end iframe-board –>

Your students will have instant access to thousands of internships and entry-level jobs. They can search by category, location, keywords, and even sign up to get new jobs emailed to them. When they see jobs of interest, they’ll click the ones of interest and go straight to the employer’s website to apply. To be clear: they will not be sent to College Recruiter or any other job search site.

There’s no fee to add this new feature to your site, which should make it far easier for your students to find the jobs they want. What we get out of it will be more candidates going to the jobs advertised by our employer customers, which will make them happier and that will, in the long run, make us happier.

Want to see what the search looks like. Here you go!

Ernst & Young's world headquarters in Hoboken, New Jersey

Posted May 14, 2019 by

Tickets now available for College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY

Diversity and inclusion have long been goals of leading employers, but the motivations behind those goals have been mixed. For some employers, diversity and making their workforces more inclusive was just something that they felt was the moral thing to do. For other employers, it was legally compelled. Fortunately, more employers are discovering that the more diverse and inclusive their workforce, the more productive is that workforce.

Join your fellow university relations, talent acquisition, and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit, and government organizations on Thursday, December 12th at Ernst & Young’s new, world headquarters across the Hudson River from Manhattan for a highly interactive, collegial, and informative day of learning. It is goal of the organizer, College Recruiter, that you’ll leave with a roadmap for how you and your organization can not only survive, but also thrive by enhancing your existing diversity and inclusion talent acquisition tactics and strategies.

Due to the generosity of our host, Ernst and Young, we are able to bring this event — our 17th College Recruiting Bootcamp — to you at a far lower cost than comparable conferences.


Welcome Reception, Wednesday, December 11, 2019

5:00pm – 8:00pm WOW Suite, W Hoboken Hotel, 225 River St, Hoboken, NJ 07030. Hosts, organizers, presenters, panelists, and attendees are welcome to join us for hot and cold appetizers, light dinner, premium wine and beer, and more than just a few good laughs.

8:00pm – ?? If the weather is nice, we’ll join panelist Gerry Crispin for a guided walk four blocks from the W Hoboken Hotel to Castle Point on the campus of Stevens’ Institute of Technology where you’ll see where Henry Hudson moored his ship when he discovered…wait for it….the Hudson River, and the best view of New York City. Gerry will share a great (old) story about the brass cannon embedded there and a nice, short tour of the campus.

Conference Agenda, Thursday, December 12, 2019:

8:30am – 9:30am Registration and casual, continental, networking breakfast.

9:30am – 9:35am Welcome from Natasha Stough, Americas Director of Campus Recruiting for host Ernst & Young, and Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer of organizer College Recruiter.

9:35am – 9:40am Why Should We Care About Diversity and Inclusion?

Presenter: Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter

9:40am – 10:00am Opening keynote: How EY built a better workforce through gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, and generational diversity and inclusion

Presenter: Ken Bouyer, Americas Director for Inclusiveness Recruiting for Ernst & Young

10:00am – 10:50am Panel discussion

  • Dawn Carter, Director, Early Careers for Intuit
  • Kim Wells, Director, EMBA & Executive Education for Howard University School of Business
  • Pam Baker, Member of College Recruiter’s Content Expert Board and Founder and CEO for Journeous
  • Kara Yarnot, Manager of College Relations for Boeing; Vice President, Talent Acquisition for SAIC; former Founder of Meritage Talent Solutions; member of College Recruiter’s board of advisors; and Vice President of Strategic Services for Hireclix

10:50am – 11:10am Networking break

11:10am – 11:30am Featured presentation: How to recruit employees with Asperger’s

Presenter: Penelope Trunk, Founder of Math.com, eCityDeals, Brazen, and Quistic and one of the world’s most widely read career advice experts

11:30am – 12:20pm Panel discussion

  • Keca Ward, Senior Director of Talent Acquisition for Phenom People
  • Paula Golladay, Schedule A Program Manager for the Internal Revenue Service
  • Janine Truitt, Member of College Recruiter’s content expert board and Chief Innovations Officer for Talent Think Innovations
  • Lois Barth, Principal and Human Development Expert for Lois Barth Coaching & Consulting Services

12:20pm – 1:20pm Catered lunch break

1:20pm – 1:40pm Closing keynote: Winning over the c-suite: How the CIA’s talent actuation leaders use productivity data to win support for its D&I programs

Presenter: Roynda Hartsfield, former Chief of Hiring for the CIA’s Directorate of Digital Innovations (DDI)

1:40pm – 2:20pm Panel discussion

  • Gerry Crispin, Principal and Co-Founder for CareerXroads
  • Sahil Sahni, Co-Founder for AllyO
  • Nijhier-Aleem Lattimer, Program Coordinator for Howard University Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center
  • Bruce Soltys, Director of Campus Recruiting for Prudential; Senior Human Resource Program Manager of University Relations, Diversity Talent Partners, and Campus Programs for Verizon; Member of College Recruiter’s Content Expert Board; and Vice President of Sourcing Strategies for Travelers Companies

2:20pm – 2:30pm Wrap-up by College Recruiter CEO Faith Rothberg.

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Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted April 25, 2019 by

To hire students, you need to recruit on campus. Right? Wrong.

At College Recruiter job search site, one of the biggest changes that we’ve seen over the past few years is the rapidly increasing number of employers who use time-to-hire, cost-per-hire, and productivity data to measure their sourcing partners, including college career service offices. Their findings are shocking to many.

For decades, employers believed that they had to travel to and recruit students on-campus if they wanted to hire “the best” candidates. Those beliefs were typically grounded in false assumptions. You’ve probably heard that productivity data shows that the more diverse and inclusive a workforce, the more productive is that workforce. But that means that an employer who only hires at a small percentage of the 3,000 four-year colleges and universities or the 4,400 one- and two-year colleges is undermining their own diversity and inclusion efforts. So the more targeted your campus recruiting efforts, the less diverse, inclusive, and productive will be your workforce. Ouch.

Another example? Many of our employer customers who have looked at their productivity data have discovered that the more elite the school the employee went to, the less productive is that employee. How can that be true? Because they leave far sooner than those hired from second or even third tier schools. One of our long-time customers is an accounting and consulting company. They cut way back on their on-campus efforts in favor of hiring through what they call “virtual” sources like College Recruiter. Why? Diversity, inclusion, and productivity. They’re becoming school and even major agnostic, meaning they don’t really care what school you went to or even what your major was. They used to only consider accounting, economics, and finance majors. Now they embrace fine arts, Russian literature, and any other major. In their words, “we can teach an employee how to read a balance sheet but we can’t teach them how to think critically”.

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other organizations who want to hire dozens or even hundreds of students and recent graduates of all one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities for part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs.

In this historically tight labor market, are you struggling to hire the dozens or even hundreds of well-targeted, well-qualified students and recent graduates for part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs? Would it make sense to either schedule a 30-minute call so that I can better understand your hiring challenges or email those to me so that I can make specific recommendations for how College Recruiter can help?