• Employers: Don’t let these 5 job search scams ruin your reputation

    June 20, 2017 by

     

    Employers beware: Job seekers aren’t the only targets of hackers, scammers, and thieves. Thieves are also conducting sophisticated job search scams targeting HR professionals, recruiters, and hiring managers. The goal of these malicious attacks is to steal identity, personal information, financial information, data, and to disrupt business.

    “Job hunters aren’t the only ones who are vulnerable to recruitment scams,” says cybersecurity journalist Maria Korolov, of TheBestVPN.com. “Companies looking for new staff could also lose money, or suffer  reputational damage, if they’re not careful.”

    As with real estate, location matters in recruitment advertising and marketing. When considering where to place a job ad or who to partner with in recruitment advertising, make sure that the job board you choose puts your company in the best light, says Korolov.

    “You want your help wanted ad listed alongside those of well-known, reputable companies, not next to scam, work-from-home offers,” says Korolov.  “Craigslist, for example, while it is one of the least expensive options, is also flooded with iffy job postings. Some sites, like College Recruiter, manually vet companies who post ads on their platforms to ensure that scammers can’t get in.”

    College Recruiter recently published The job seeker’s guide to identifying and avoiding job search scams, which highlighted the fact that the team at College Recruiter takes the threat of job search scams, recruitment advertising scams, and fake job postings seriously, and has implemented a multi-step process that identifies and blocks the vast majority of identity thieves and other scammers from ever posting a job to College Recruiter. In fact, every single job advertisement placed on College Recruiter goes through an in-depth verification process to prove the job posting is legitimate, and all ads are verified through actual contact with a human with the employer posting the job ad – something not every job board can claim.

    “Here at College Recruiter, we take these fraudulent attempts very seriously and work daily to ensure all the jobs that are posted on our web site are from verified employers to protect our job seekers from applying, interviewing, and becoming victims of identity theft,” says Dani Bennett, Sales and Client Services Manager at College Recruiter.

    To combat rising efforts of employers being the target of job search scams, College Recruiter’s CEO Faith Rothberg moderated a panel discussion on this topic at the 2016 TATech Industry Congress event in Orlando. In the panel discussion, and in this video, Rothberg and members of TATech, the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions, discussed solutions for employers looking for ways to confront recruitment advertising and job search scams head on.

    There are five kinds of scams HR professionals should be aware of:

    1. Job search scams targeting employers’ campus recruiting efforts

    Alisha Barton, University Relations Program Manager for Kerry, a leader in the food, beverage, and pharma industries, with 23,000 staff and 100+ innovation and manufacturing centers across six continents, has a sister who is a junior in college who received a phishing email from someone claiming to be a recruiter from Google.

    “A common phishing scam on campuses that affects both an employer and job seekers is one where the scammer uses an email address that is similar to a company’s real email domain,” says Barton. “When scammers contact students, they often email with a list of positions and indicate that the candidate is a fit, or even hired, for these openings. They might even include real job descriptions. The email directs the student to a third party website, where they’re asked to enter in their personal information to obtain employment. The phishers use this information to steal the job seekers identity.”

    In a recruiting scam like this, the college student would be the one most greatly affected, but this also affects the brand and reputation of the employer, because college students will surely talk about a potential scam that happened when applying to certain companies, which could scare off other college students or recent college grads, from applying from open jobs. It could lead to that recent college grad going to social media to share the phishing/scam story, and that could then alert future candidates who may be hesitant to apply for a job with that company.

    Barton said the HR team at Kerry works closely with campus career centers to ensure job seekers are aware of Kerry’s hiring process, to prevent these type of phishing scams to affect both job seekers and employers. It’s important for other employers to do the same.

    “An employer’s reputation is on the line, and developing campus relationships are key to avoiding and preventing these types of scams,” says Barton.

    It’s important for companies to be aware of these situations to protect their brand image, says Tony Sorensen, who has over 20 years of experience providing strategic advicee on recruiting strategy, and is CEO and Founder of Versique Search and Consulting. “Companies thrive off of credibility and trust. If companies are not aware of these scams, something like this can severely damage a company’s integrity.”

    2. Job search scams where thieves steal company logo and creating fake career sites

    Some scammers go as far as stealing a company logo, and creating a job site similar to an employers online career site. HR professionals and recruiters need to watch for these types of scams. It happens to the biggest companies too, not just small employers. In July, Shell Oil, one of America’s largest oil and natural gas producers with over 22,000 employees, posted a notice on its careers site warning job seekers that scammers were using the Shell name and logo to recruit for positions. These scammers can create some serious mistrust and reputation damage.

    3. Ransomware targets HR departments, posing as job applicants

    Another scam: GoldenEye ransomware targets HR departments, seeking new/inexperienced HR professionals or recruiters, or those not trained on the latest cybersecurity threats, phishing, or other job search scams. Employees end up opening emails and attachments from unknown sources, without much thought. These hackers pose as job applicants, complete with cover letters and resumes, and can infect target computers or companies with malicious software via Excel files supposedly containing an application form. Once the spreadsheet is opened by the victim, and macros enabled to run as prompted, GoldenEye executes a code that encrypts the user’s files and presents them with a ransom note. This happened at the Berlin headquarters of one large recruiting and staffing firm, and hackers demanded a ransom of approximately $1,000, or 1.4 bitcoins, in order to retrieve the now encrypted files.

    When this happened, all HR personnel – and other staff – were advised not to open emails with Excel files attached or to enable macros, unless the sender was known and confirmed. The situation prompted a company-wide re-evaluation of security holes, especially in the HR department, in order to prevent the loss of critical files, downtime, and disruption that can be caused by an aggressive ransomware attack.

    4. Fake resumes/fraudulent video conference calls

    Fake candidates also are likely to submit over-exaggerated resumes, with too many skill sets that seems too good to be true, or a resume with fake education or certifications. Some will even make up colleges or universities. Other scammers may advance to an phone interview stage, but persist on a video conference interview where they can send harmful click bait through a video conference line, says Sorensen.

    That’s why it’s especially important for HR leaders and recruiters to educate all employees about potential phishing scams, especially those in HR who may receive hundreds of emails a day or week.

    Sorensen says employers and HR professionals can ensure they are not victims of recruitment advertising scams or job search scams by understanding that if an email attachment, or job inquiry seems suspicious, do some extra digging or research. “When in doubt, Google the company, position or candidate, and check social media profiles,” says Sorensen.

    5. Tax scams targeting HR professionals

    One common phishing scam targets HR and payroll staff during tax season. That’s why now is the time to start educating employees – not in a hurry before tax season. According to the SHRM article HR Beware: ’Tis the Season for W-2 Scams as tax deadline nears, HR should be aware that cyber thieves typically target new HR workers. According to SHRM, “between January and March of 2015, more than 55 businesses had reportedly been tricked into emailing criminals sensitive payroll data, according to the security blog Cloudmark. HR professionals—some of whom were fired for exposing private information—were duped when they received spoofed or fake e-mail messages, like the one above, from thieves posing as senior company officials. Crooks obtain W-2s with Social Security numbers, salary data, birthdates, addresses and other personally identifiable information. They then file fake federal tax returns and claim refunds from the government. Employees may not realize they’ve been victimized until after they file their taxes.”

    The bottom line is all employees, especially HR and recruiters who are dealing with sensitive, private data, and who use technology tools frequently to do their job, need to be educated and trained on Cyber threats and scams, says Robert Siciliano, an expert in identify theft and CEO of the security firm IDTheftSecurity.com.

    “We should teach workers how to handle data to minimize the potential of its falling into the wrong hands,” said Siciliano. Siciliano also said that every employee—new and old—should get thorough training, and that each worker’s access to sensitive company data should be limited in accordance with his or her role in the organization. “And new employees, before they officially begin work, should complete this training before accessing the company’s network.”

    “It’s important that not only the company, but the employees as well, are actively aware of scams and taking precautions so they aren’t exposing themselves or the company to cyber threats that could harm its reputation,” says Sorensen.

    Says Korolov: “A bad experience that leaves an applicant with a bad taste in their mouth – or, worse yet, costs them money – will damage your company’s reputation.”

    Keep informed of recruiting best practices by staying connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube. Hiring soon? Would it make sense to have a brief conversation about your hiring needs? Consider College Recruiter’s advertising solutions, or email sales@collegerecruiter.com.

     

  • Onboarding new employees starts before first day on job

    May 02, 2017 by

     

    A new employee who is not onboarded the right way is going to have difficulty finding a sense of belonging inside an organization, says Scott Redfearn, executive vice president of global HR at Protiviti, a global business consulting and internal audit firm.

    “Employees who don’t have a meaningful career experience aren’t going to last, and they will not perform to their full potential,” says Redfearn.

    The reality is, the process for onboarding new employees starts well before the new hire’s first day on the job. Successful companies know this, and set up a series of touchpoints and check-ins to ensure new hires feel welcome, and are prepared, before the first day on the job.

    This is especially important for the recent college grad embarking on their first journey into the real world. The process for onboarding new employees is the employer’s opportunity to make a great first impression, and show recent college grads their company is a good place to work, and that they will be given an opportunity to grow and succeed.

    “Employers should realize that some recent college grads are still in the process of understanding the difference between their initial dreams and reality,” says Max Dubroff, an HR consultant and former adjunct professor with the University of Phoenix who taught Masters level courses on management and organizational behavior.

    “They may have thought for years that they would get into one of the best-known companies, but even if your company doesn’t make those best places to work lists, or even if it isn’t a Fortune 500 organization, you have the opportunity to show them the value of a good/great job in a good/great organization.”

    Onboarding should engage new employees before the first day on the job

    At Protiviti, new campus hires start the onboarding process months before their actual start date, because in many cases a student will accept a job offer during the fall semester, but not actually start until after graduation the following May, says Redfearn. These new hires are also assigned a peer advisor who meets with them before they start and new hires are even invited to holiday parties, community service activities, and other office events where they can meet their future co-workers.

    “Once candidates accept an offer, we begin integrating them right away,” says Redfearn. “During this time, we communicate often through email, webinars, social media, and in person.”

    Before a new employee walks through the door for the first time, employers should have already share the organization’s history, vision, and mission.

    “Insight into the company’s purpose and plan for success will help immerse new employees into the workplace culture more quickly,” says Deb LaMere, Vice President of Employee Experience at Ceridian, a human capital management firm.

    Sharing this type of information can be done through a portal that new hires can access before they officially start, or simply direct them to any relevant public content from the company website or blog that addresses the organization’s values, says LaMere.

    How important are these steps? Robert Half Finance & Accounting research shows new hires have less than three months to prove themselves in a new job. Many recent college grads are looking for guidance, and good employers provide that through a strong onboarding program.

    Doing little things provide big value. For example, Steve Saah Director of Permanent Placement Services with Robert Half, encourages employers to send a welcome letter to a candidate immediately upon acceptance of the job offer. Consider including some kind of company ‘swag’ with the letter, if it’s available.

    “This gives them a warm welcome and gets them excited to start in their new role,” says Saah. “It also reinforces that the candidate made the right decision in accepting the offer.”

    Continue Reading

  • Most desirable jobs survey results are in

    January 11, 2017 by

    The 2016 Most Desirable Jobs survey has some surprising results. The Career Advisory Board (CAB), of which College Recruiter’s founder Steven Rothberg is a member, released the survey recently. Their intention is to advise employers, who increasingly find themselves in steep competition for qualified talent. The results include ideal job characteristics, most appealing work styles and what employees value at work.  Employers will rejoice when they hear that they may not have to throw out their conventional wisdom.

    One key finding that may surprise you: Millennials were more likely to want to work in an office every day than their older colleagues. We spoke with Alexandra Levit, business and workplace consultant and Career Advisory Board member. She gave us her interpretation of the survey results, including what surprised her, trends of the Millennial generation, the gig economy, and more. Watch our interview with Alexandra:

  • Tweak your application process to be more respectful

    December 14, 2016 by

     

    The same tools that save recruiters time often make the application process feel robotic and cold, at least from the job seeker’s point of view. As you work to woo people into your company, it would be a bad idea to turn them off. You can use time-saving technology and still be respectful and applicant-centric.

    Your employer brand will suffer if you don’t take steps to be respectful.

    Any negativity that a candidate experiences can go viral. Your employer brand doesn’t just depend on the culture you create for current employees. The experience you create for potential employees, including everyone who never gets an interview, is also part of your company brand. Recruiters may groan at having to sift through 500 resumes for a single position, but that’s a gold mine for branding. That resume stack represents a captive audience. Unlike your passive followers on social media who you wish would just click “like” occasionally, those job applicants are eagerly waiting to hear from you.

    Recruitment skills are like sales skills, so recruiters: sell your brand and your company’s experience. Don’t overlook how important your own customer service skills are. Your candidates are your customers.

    Don’t risk losing the top candidates

    When you treat candidates like a herd of cattle, think about who you are losing. Employers large and small consistently place soft skills at the top of their wish list. Those skills include integrity, dependability, communication, and ability to work with others. A candidate with high integrity will drop out of the race quickly if they sense that a recruiter doesn’t regard them as worth more than a few seconds of their time. If you lose integrity from your pool, what do you have left?

    Juli Smith, President of The Smith Consulting Group, agrees that the lack of respect for candidates has consequences. “It can be very devastating to hear nothing.  Even bad news can be taken better than radio silence for days or weeks.” Candidates may have gotten used to being treated insignificantly during the job search, but that doesn’t mean they’ll put up with it for much longer. As companies start to figure out how to treat them better, you don’t want to be the last company standing with a humorless, disrespectful and overly-automated job application process.

    A few little tweaks can make a difference

    Like other great salespeople, good recruiters know how to read people. Let your recruiters bring their own humanness to the process. Don’t stifle their instincts to be respectful by automating every step of the way. If they truly have no time to insert a human touch along the way, then ask the most jovial member of your team to come up with better automated responses to candidates. Compare these two auto-emails:  Continue Reading

  • How employers should deal with helicopter parents

    December 09, 2016 by

    Parental involvement during the job application process is on the rise, as we are all well aware. For older generations, the ways parents get involved may seem shocking, but it does no good to just scoff. Employers should know how to respond to both candidates and parents when they get that phone call from a mom or dad.

    Feedback for candidates

    It is entirely possible that a candidate’s mom or dad is intervening without their child’s knowledge. This might be to the utter embarrassment of the candidate, but it is important for them to be aware. Brandi Britton is District President of  OfficeTeam. She says it’s important to “reinforce that behind-the-scenes parental involvement is totally fine, such as reviewing resumes, conducting mock interviews or offering networking contacts, but direct contact with companies is inappropriate.”

    After you’ve made it clear to candidates that you would rather not deal with their parents, make sure they know you are not going to discount them in the application process. This is important: an applicant’s skills are independent of their parents and you should not punish them for their parents’ behavior.

    Being proactive may be the best approach of all. Christy Hopkins of Fit Small Business suggests providing applicants with an FAQ that accompanies your confirmation of their application. Those FAQ may be exactly what a parent may want to know, like pay rate, number of hours, application timeline. If the applicant forwards it to mom or dad, hopefully you have just avoided that awkward phone call.

    Feedback for parents

    Have the same response prepared for every parent. This preparation saves you time and ensures objectivity. Hopkins suggests something along the lines of:  “Thank you so much for emailing/calling me to say hello. I appreciate how invested you are in your child’s success, and I can understand since I am a parent. However, in order to keep things fair for every applicant, I cannot talk about our selection process. Thank you very much for understanding.”

    If you are like many HR professionals, it is annoying to deal with parents. However, as recruitment marketing becomes more strategic, remember that each interaction with any stakeholder presents an opportunity. “Being approached by a job applicant’s parent, or indeed anyone closely connected to the candidate is an opportunity to build your employer brand,” says Kevin Mulcahy, author of The Future Workplace Experience.

    It’s  not your job to teach them a lesson, but Joanie Connell at Flexible Work Solutions includes a scare tactic in her response to parents. She tells them, “We find that applicants whose parents call in are less serious about the job than applicants who contact us directly.” This response is fine as long as you are not actually discounting the candidates’ applications.

    Be fair

    While it may be tempting to take all this into account in your hiring decision, be careful. Presumably most candidates do not have their mom or dad calling you, so beware of introducing an additional measure that only applies to one or two candidates. However, if a candidate reacts badly to your feedback, that may tell you something about how they may behave as an employee.

    This may go without saying, but don’t take parents up on their attempts to influence your decisions. If they contact the hiring manager outside of HR, the manager should know to politely decline, noting the importance of privacy laws.

    Embrace the change!

    Enterprise is a company that embraces the relationship with parents during recruitment. They see that it builds a stronger relationships with candidates. They invite parents to interns’ final projects, and has a Bring your Parent to Work Day.

    Maybe parental involvement doesn’t have to be annoying. Recognize that Millennials’ relationships with their parents are just different than those of Baby Boomers. Not worse or better, but different. You may call it hand holding, but many of the changes that Millennials’ present can be good for all of us. For example, more positive feedback, more work-life balance, and perhaps a mentor are good things for all your employees, not just the twenty somethings.

  • Oven-ready hires: The problem of matching available skills to our demands

    October 28, 2016 by

    Oven ready dishGuest writer Martin Edmondson, CEO and founder of Gradcore

    It feels like there is an ever-growing consensus among employers that university graduates should emerge fully formed, perfectly skilled and immediately work ready. The phrase ‘oven ready’ graduates appears far too often for my liking. It oversimplifies what is ultimately a very complicated issue: How do you match the supply of skills and people with the demands of the economy, when both are moving targets? In other words, how much should employers compromise when searching for the ideal candidate? How much should they training should they assume?

     

    This is such a significant issue in the UK that the government has created a ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ for universities. One of its goals is to tackle “skill mismatches” in the economy. (Go figure that the same government is now limiting their own access to skilled talent via immigration clampdowns.)

    Every employer presents unique circumstances. So it’s critical for employers to examine their fundamental approach to hiring with a few questions such as:

    • What characterizes the hires you make that are successful, and those that are not?
    • What is the most critical factor for fit with your organization – skills, values, attitude etc?
    • How recently did you evaluate what is really important in the people you hire?
    • If all the evidence says that those people are not available for that price in this place, which one of those variables are you prepared to change?

    Here is the challenge: So many employers are seeking candidates with the skills that are in shortage areas. This is typically around digital and software roles where there is a major disconnect between employer requirements and the quality and quantity of graduates available. Employers (and policy makers who are trying to solve these problems) should try one of the following:

    1. Grow your own

    This is the long game, but often one of the most successful approaches if you have the time. Recruit graduates who have the core attributes or values that suit your organisation, but need to develop their skills further. Then put in place the structured training that will develop them. This could be in house training, or delivered under emerging models such as degree-apprenticeships.

    2. Think differently

    Stop looking at the really obvious candidates. This could be described as the Blue Ocean approach, getting away from where everyone else is fishing. Recently I saw a very interesting post from a company called Talla about mapping resumes using neural networks. This visual approach helps you to appreciate that people who superficially have seemingly different backgrounds are actually remarkably similar. Each of the dots below is a resume. This shows how different titles share characteristics:Point graph of title descriptions on resumes

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Up the budget

    Sometimes you simply need to either increase the budget in order to reach a wider audience, or increase salary to attract the necessary skills. While it’s never ideal, there are clearly certain economic realities that are hard to escape.

    Underlying all of this is a bigger societal question, which will be answered differently in different countries:

    Whose job is it to make a person employable?

    Is it the role of the education system and teachers? Employers? Parents or the state? Or are we all solely responsible for our own development? All play a part, but the prevailing national answer to this question goes a long way to deciding the expectations employers have of graduates and vice versa.

     

    Look forward to discussing this and lots of other topics around college recruiting at the College Recruiter Bootcamp in Washington DC on December 8.

    martin-edmondsonMartin is the CEO and founder of Gradcore, a social enterprise focused on graduate employment and employability. Martin has more than 15 years of experience in graduate recruitment and Higher Education. He founded Gradcore, and over the last decade has led a wide range of graduate recruitment and employability projects. These include running global graduate schemes for a range of large employers, delivering employability performance improvement in universities, and chairing the UK and European Graduate Employment Conferences. Martin was a member of the steering group for the ‘graduate recruitment in SMEs’ report for the UK government and has written for a wide range of newspapers and websites. Connect with Martin on LinkedIn.

  • Interviewing student veterans

    October 11, 2016 by

    1700620Are you interviewing a student veteran for a job at your company? Congrats! Veterans bring a set of skills that can stand above the other students you are interviewing.

    If you are like many hiring managers, you have limited experience interviewing vets, and are not extremely familiar with what military experience looks like. It’s important to make sure you don’t ask anything inappropriate. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your interview while remaining sensitive and legal.

    What NOT to ask

    • Unless you are hiring for a Federal agency or work with Veteran Preference Points, don’t ask about their discharge status.
    • You cannot ask if they will be deployed in the future, even if their resume says they are in the Reserves.
    • Do not ask about potential disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act states that an employer may only ask disability-related questions after the applicant has been offered a job.
    • “Do you have PTSD?” (First, check your biases about vets and PTSD, and second, any question that relates to their mental health is legally off limits.)
    • “Did you get hurt in combat?” or “Do you expect your injury to heal normally?”
    • “Have you ever participated in a drug or alcohol rehabilitation program?”

    Instead, you can ask…

    • Behavior-based questions that help you truly understand their previous experience
    • Questions about their goals (be smart and avoid the cliche “Where do you see yourself in the future?”)
    • “How did you deal with pressure or stress?”
    • According to the Office of Disability Employment Policy, you may ask “”How did you break your leg?”
    • “Have you ever been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol?”

    Veterans Day is November 11. Reach out to student veteran groups as part of your college recruitment this fall, and you may be impressed with what you find.

  • Student veterans: Do you think you know them?

    October 04, 2016 by
    Multi-ethnic US Navy officers saluting each other over light blue background

    What skills can veterans bring to your company? Are you sure you know?

    Most organizations say they are interested in recruiting student veterans, and many large companies have whole teams dedicated to veteran recruitment. Yet we often see a disconnect between these teams and the college recruitment teams.  Some college relations teams don’t know what to do with student veterans so they refer them to the military recruitment team. The military recruitment team often doesn’t know what to do with students and so they refer them over to the college relations team.

    Why should your company care about getting this right? First, you are likely to encounter more student veterans in the future as more service members return home from deployment. These students have characteristics that are attractive to employers, but civilian hiring managers may not have much more than stereotypes of military experience when they consider recruiting a student veteran.

     “The U.S. military today is gradually becoming a separate warrior class… that is becoming increasingly distinct from the public it is charged with protecting.” (LA Times special report)

    While the student veteran must learn to articulate his or her qualifications, recruiters should become more familiar with what military experience can mean. As a group, service members offer an incredibly diverse set of skills. A quick visit to goarmy.com shows ten categories of jobs available in the Army alone, from engineering and legal careers, to admin support and the arts. To educate yourself further, ask any veterans already working at your company about their experience. Absolutely ask your candidates about the specific jobs they held, training they received and leadership skills they developed (translating military to civilian). 

    The majority of veterans on college campuses are “non-traditional” students. They are not entering straight from high school and are generally not dependent on their parents, so they are more independent and experienced than other students you’re recruiting (Veterans and College). Because of military culture, veterans may espouse a set of characteristics that are appealing to managers. For example, service members are already used to regularly being evaluated on their performance. How many Millennials can say that?

    Leading up to Veterans Day on November 11, consider including student veterans in your college outreach. Your bottom line will thank you.

  • Do you use vanity metrics to measure recruitment?

    September 29, 2016 by

     

    Do you know the difference between “vanity metrics” and “business metrics?” Many people assume they do, but oftentimes they don’t.

    “Vanity metrics” are aspects of a business we track because the numbers are larger and it sounds better to present them to our bosses and other stakeholders. Examples are:

    • Impressions
    • Out-of-context attendance figures
    • Pageviews
    • Any number that sounds or looks good on a PowerPoint

    Contrast that with “business metrics,” which are slices of data that really explain how your business is performing. In retail, for example, this is traditionally something like revenue per square foot. In college recruiting, it might be percentage of interns converted or a diversity metric indicating a balanced recruiting cycle. These pockets of information can more directly be tied to the success of what you’re doing, bottom-line or otherwise.

    Many companies confuse “vanity metrics” and “business metrics,” and this leads to suspect ROI. You’ve probably sat in a meeting and presented some big, impressive-looking numbers — only to have a senior leader ask “Well, why is performance down?” You stumble a bit and can’t answer. “But the metrics look good, sir…”

    They actually don’t, because they’re not tied to the right outcomes.

    Consider how this might look in college relations programs. You might track something like “number of students in the hiring funnel,” which is ultimately a vanity metric — it doesn’t necessarily point to the quality of potential hires. Rather, you could track quality of hire per school you work with; this would help you identify relationships to cease over time, which will help you cut recruiting costs. In this context, one is a “vanity metric” (it’s tracked because a big number sounds good) and one is a business metric (it helps you make strategic decisions about your processes). 

  • Are you wasting millions on your on-campus recruiting approach? It’s possible.

    September 21, 2016 by
    Ted Bauer

    Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

    By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

    This headline from October 2015 in Harvard Business Review says it all: “Firms are wasting millions recruiting on only a few college campuses.”

    We’ve seen this for years, especially among the EPS companies across investment banks, management consulting firms, and law firms. There are “target” campuses and then there’s “everyone else.” While you might get some amazingly high-quality people (good!), overall the process has a lot of waste, financially and in terms of potential burnout for your recruiting team.

    There’s a better way. Ever seen the stat that it took 35 years to construct the federal highway system, but Facebook reached 500 million users in six years? It’s an obvious stat, sure — but it speaks to the amazing power of digital to both connect and scale.

    No matter how you approach digital vs. in-person, your goal should be to maximize your ROI from your college recruiting efforts. To do that, you might need to move around some budget buckets: less on-campus and more interactive/digital/social/job board work.