ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

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Posted January 15, 2019 by

We need to stop blaming hourly, service industry workers for being poor when we pay them crap and treat them worse

More than 10,000 talent acquisition and other human resource professionals are avid readers of Hung Lee‘s excellent, weekly, e-newsletter, Recruiting Brainfood. If you’re in TA, HR, or an affiliated industry like I am, then you need to subscribe if you care about staying current with new technology, trends, and ways of looking at the world of recruitment.

Hung recently shared an article published by Huffington Post by Lauren Hough. The article, “I Was A Cable Guy. I Saw The Worst Of America”, was a fascinating, first-person view into the life of a lesbian (her sexual identification was quite relevant to the article) cable installer for a telecommunications company.  She made — and admitted to making — some mistakes and some ethical lapses, but for those of us whose jobs require far more muscle between our ears than on our arms, legs, and backs, it provided an incredibly powerful reminder of how hard service industry people work, how poorly they’re paid, and how awfully they’re treated. I shared the article to the new, Recruiting Brainfood group on Facebook, and that sparked an interesting discussion. (more…)

Guidance counselor talking to a teenager. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted January 09, 2019 by

What colleges don’t want high school students and parents to consider during the application process

A friend of mine recently posted to Facebook that the guidance counselor at the high school her kids attend recently indicated that “most” colleges require at least three years of a second language in order to consider the student for possible admission. I called b.s. on that statement and then outlined some additional information that high school guidance counselors and college admissions representatives often either don’t know or, for whatever reason, often fail to communicate:

I know you and I are on the same page, but the guidance counselor is providing terrible guidance and needs to be more careful about accurately guiding her students. 

There are 8 Ivy League schools. There are 3,000, four-year colleges. There are another 4,300 one- and two-year colleges. 

Ivys represent 0.267 percent of four-year colleges. Hardly representative.

More important words of advice: Talk openly and honestly with your kids about the financial impact of college. 

Here is the reality: if a family is wealthy and can pay out of pocket — including savings — then the cost isn’t as important.  (more…)

Posted November 19, 2018 by

Superb hiring news for class of 2019: best hiring outlook since 2007

 

Economic news released today by the National Association of Colleges and Employers contained a lot of great news for students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities.

According to a survey of NACE employer members, only four percent of employers plan to decrease their hiring of recent college grads while a whopping 57.4 percent plan to increase such hiring. For those who aren’t human calculators, that means that 38.6 percent plan to maintain their number of hires. Even better news is that the percent increase in projected hires came in at 16.6 percent, which would be the largest increase in 12 years. It is noteworthy that the hiring rate has not been increasing year-after-year since the Great Recession of 2008-09. Indeed, the class of 2018 saw hiring decrease by 1.3 percent.

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Posted September 22, 2018 by

8 tips for how to hire nurses

Nurses. Year-after-year, we hear from hospitals, doctors’ offices, and other organizations how frustrated they are in trying to hire nurses, whether they are entry-level, recent graduates or have years of experience.

Before I dig into some suggestions for how any organization can hire more nurses, let’s first examine whether the underlying premise of a shortage is even true. Well, it’s true. “Currently there are nearly three million jobs for registered nurses, and there are more than 2.9 million licensed RNs, which doesn’t seem like a significant shortage,” said Joe Dunmire, executive director of Qualivis. “But 21 percent of licensed RNs are not engaged in patient care, which makes the actual deficit nearly 700,000.” To make that worse, Qualivis expects that there will be more than a million RN vacancies by 2024, which is more than twice the deficit of the last major nursing shortage.

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Posted March 13, 2018 by

Changing priorities at College Recruiter to help employers hire at scale

 

Recently, someone asked me what College Recruiter’s priorities were five years ago, versus our priorities today. And if they changed, why?

Five years ago, we were all still emerging from the Great Recession. The economy was unstable. No one really knew if we were about to plunge back into a recession or if we were in the early stages of a long, slow, and unsteady recovery. Fortunately, the latter was the case. At College Recruiter, revenues and profits were increasing and we were looking to the next three, four, even five years and making strategic decisions.  (more…)

Posted October 28, 2016 by

Oven-ready hires: The problem of matching available skills to our demands

Oven ready dishGuest writer Martin Edmondson, CEO and founder of Gradcore

It feels like there is an ever-growing consensus among employers that university graduates should emerge fully formed, perfectly skilled and immediately work ready. The phrase ‘oven ready’ graduates appears far too often for my liking. It oversimplifies what is ultimately a very complicated issue: How do you match the supply of skills and people with the demands of the economy, when both are moving targets? In other words, how much should employers compromise when searching for the ideal candidate? How much should they training should they assume?

 

This is such a significant issue in the UK that the government has created a ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ for universities. One of its goals is to tackle “skill mismatches” in the economy. (Go figure that the same government is now limiting their own access to skilled talent via immigration clampdowns.)

Every employer presents unique circumstances. So it’s critical for employers to examine their fundamental approach to hiring with a few questions such as:

  • What characterizes the hires you make that are successful, and those that are not?
  • What is the most critical factor for fit with your organization – skills, values, attitude etc?
  • How recently did you evaluate what is really important in the people you hire?
  • If all the evidence says that those people are not available for that price in this place, which one of those variables are you prepared to change?

Here is the challenge: So many employers are seeking candidates with the skills that are in shortage areas. This is typically around digital and software roles where there is a major disconnect between employer requirements and the quality and quantity of graduates available. Employers (and policy makers who are trying to solve these problems) should try one of the following:

1. Grow your own

This is the long game, but often one of the most successful approaches if you have the time. Recruit graduates who have the core attributes or values that suit your organisation, but need to develop their skills further. Then put in place the structured training that will develop them. This could be in house training, or delivered under emerging models such as degree-apprenticeships.

2. Think differently

Stop looking at the really obvious candidates. This could be described as the Blue Ocean approach, getting away from where everyone else is fishing. Recently I saw a very interesting post from a company called Talla about mapping resumes using neural networks. This visual approach helps you to appreciate that people who superficially have seemingly different backgrounds are actually remarkably similar. Each of the dots below is a resume. This shows how different titles share characteristics:Point graph of title descriptions on resumes

 

 

 

 

 

3. Up the budget

Sometimes you simply need to either increase the budget in order to reach a wider audience, or increase salary to attract the necessary skills. While it’s never ideal, there are clearly certain economic realities that are hard to escape.

Underlying all of this is a bigger societal question, which will be answered differently in different countries:

Whose job is it to make a person employable?

Is it the role of the education system and teachers? Employers? Parents or the state? Or are we all solely responsible for our own development? All play a part, but the prevailing national answer to this question goes a long way to deciding the expectations employers have of graduates and vice versa.

 

Look forward to discussing this and lots of other topics around college recruiting at the College Recruiter Bootcamp in Washington DC on December 8.

martin-edmondsonMartin is the CEO and founder of Gradcore, a social enterprise focused on graduate employment and employability. Martin has more than 15 years of experience in graduate recruitment and Higher Education. He founded Gradcore, and over the last decade has led a wide range of graduate recruitment and employability projects. These include running global graduate schemes for a range of large employers, delivering employability performance improvement in universities, and chairing the UK and European Graduate Employment Conferences. Martin was a member of the steering group for the ‘graduate recruitment in SMEs’ report for the UK government and has written for a wide range of newspapers and websites. Connect with Martin on LinkedIn.

Posted September 30, 2016 by

5 simple strategies for recent college grads struggling to save for retirement

save money words on a chalkboard illustrating back to school savings or instructions on how to save on your education costs

Save money now, reap the rewards later. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

We get it. You just graduated from college, and landed that first job. It’s an exciting time.

It’s also expensive.

You have your own apartment now, but rent is a lot higher when not living in that college town, or with fewer roommates to split the costs. Then there is that car payment and car insurance. And you are now paying for health insurance on your own for the first time. Wow, that is expensive, right? Suddenly, that salary you didn’t negotiate suddenly looks a lot smaller after taxes and deductions are taken out.

And let’s not forget those dreaded student loans you are starting to pay back. Those are a real drain, literally and figuratively. Did you borrow money from mom and dad? It might be time to pay them back too. It’s tough. And now that you finally have a job and are making some money, you want to have some fun and spend a little extra, go on a vacation, or splurge on yourself.

Save for retirement? Not now. There’s plenty of time, right? Yes, there is. But trust us, it’s never too soon for recent college grads and Millennials to focus on retirement. That may be the last thing an early-to-mid 20-something is thinking about, especially with so many other expenses.

But…follow the wise advice of professionals.

“With student loan debt and health care costs, many recent college graduates may think they need to defer or limit the amount they save for retirement until they have more money to put towards their retirement savings,” says Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

ADP’s annual study on retirement savings trends shows that employees age 20-24 defer an average of 4.6 percent of their pay into a tax qualified retirement plan, while employees age 55 and older defer an average of 8.5 percent. Yet, the cost of waiting does not add up. Recent graduates should instead start saving as early as possible – even if it is just a small portion of income.

“Being proactive today can reap big rewards tomorrow,” says DeSilva.

Below are four steps recent college graduates can take today to set themselves up for the retirement they want tomorrow:

1. Don’t wait to save until all your college loans are paid off: Save now to take advantage of compound earnings. If you wait even 10 years to start contributing to a retirement plan, you could miss out on many thousands of dollars in retirement savings.

2. Actively plan your retirement: Even if a retirement plan is offered by your employer, only you can take charge of your future financial security. Ask your Human Resources department for help in deciphering your benefit options.

3. Maximize your savings early in your career: Choose to have your employer automatically increase your retirement plan contribution every year.

4. Establish good money management habits: Focus on saving, smart budgeting and planning for emergencies. In other words, live only within your means.

While a recent college graduate isn’t likely to accept or move on from a job based on the retirement plan of the employee, it’s best to find an employer who at least offers a company match. That can help motivate recent college grads to start saving because it’s an easy way to start building your retirement base.

“While they may have many decades before retirement, Millennials can benefit from employers who guide them in making smart retirement savings choices now, at the beginning of their careers,” says DeSilva.

It’s never too early to start saving for retirement, even for recent college grads, entry-level employees and Millennials at all stages of their professional career.

Want to learn more about how to save money for retirement while managing the start of your professional career? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

Joe DeSilva, Senior Vice President/General Manager, ADP Retirement Services.

About Joe DeSilva
Joe DeSilva is Senior Vice President and General Manager of ADP’s Retirement Services business unit, which serves a national client base of small, medium and Fortune 500 businesses. He is responsible for setting the strategy and overseeing the day-to-day operations of the business, which includes Sales, Marketing, Product, Development, Service and Operations functions.

The views expressed herein are those of the author, are intended for general information only and are not intended to provide investment, financial, tax or legal advice or a recommendation for any particular situation or plan.  ADP, LLC and its affiliates (ADP) do not endorse or recommend specific investment companies or products, financial advisors or service providers; engage or compensate any financial advisors to provide advice to plans or participants; offer financial, investment, tax or legal advice or management services; or serve in a fiduciary capacity with respect to retirement plans.  Nothing herein is intended to be, nor should be construed as, advice or a recommendation for a particular situation or plan.  Please consult with your own advisors for such advice.

 

Posted August 29, 2016 by

Will robots replace fast food workers?

Robot works with cloud computer. Technology concept

Robot works with cloud computer. Technology concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

I was recently asked by a journalist whether robots are likely to replace the cashiers, cooks, and others who are employed fast food restaurants. As with most things in life, the answer isn’t so black-and-white.

Many of the students and some of the recent grads who use College Recruiter are employed by fast food restaurants. In fact, one of our employees was a “sandwich artist” at Subway prior to joining us.

There’s no doubt that automation will continue to impact the number and types of jobs in fast food restaurants but I don’t buy the argument that digital ordering, kiosks, tablets, and other methods will replace human workers in fast food restaurants. Just look at banks. Have ATM’s reduced the need for human tellers? Absolutely. But have ATM’s come close to eliminating the need for human tellers? Absolutely not.

Posted June 19, 2016 by

6 hiring trends job seekers should watch for in 2016

“Congratulations! We are pleased to inform you that you are hired in our organization.”

No matter how many times you have read these magical words, they sound just as thrilling as you read them the first time. If you intend to read them again in your mail this year, then luckily the time is right for you to make a job transition.

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

2016 brings a wave of new opportunities. As unemployment hits the lowest record since the last five years, there is more scope for job seekers to find better work opportunities; hiring is on the rise. However, this is not the only good news of the New Year. There are also the growing economic conditions that will have a positive impact on the pay scale and perks of employees, making it a perfect time to switch jobs.

On one hand, this is a sigh of relief for job seekers who lived through the ordeal of recession and unemployment in the past couple of years. It also poses many challenges to recruiters who will have to revisit their company policies to compete in the market.

Without further ado, let’s find out what other hiring trends the year holds for the job seekers:

1. Social media will rule the roost

Social media is ubiquitous. As it emerges as a new tool for hiring talent, your social presence will have a say in the success of your job application. Now is the time to update your social profiles as employers will be evaluating you through your presence on major social media platforms.

Having an impressive online profile will not only increase your outreach to potential employers, but it will also get you in front of lucrative job opportunities offered by leading organizations. Therefore, it is high time for you to create strong profiles on leading social media websites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter.

2. Hiring for remote workers will increase

With improvement in collaboration tools, remote employees have evolved as an alternative workforce. No longer do recruiters have to resort to “in-house hiring” process which is both costly and time-consuming for the companies. Since employers can freelance work, the remote work culture will continue to thrive in 2016.

So, if you are a part-time academic writer who offers assignment assistance with quality, you can make it a full-time job this year by finding freelance work opportunities.

3. Flexible work will no longer be a dream

In 2016, the employee’s fantasy of flexible work will become a corporate reality. With changing corporate cultures and attitudes, more businesses are inclining their hiring policies towards flexible work programs. The current year will see a rapid growth in businesses offering flexible hours and alternative work spaces which help them accommodate talent who cannot work under the regular work scenarios.

4. Boomerang hires will be on the rise

According to a survey by Workplace Trends, 76% of the companies are welcoming of the employees who once worked with them. As this hiring trend increases in popularity, more job seekers look for rehiring opportunities for their next job role.

5. Video resumes will become more trendy

With hiring getting more personal, more recruiters will expect to see video resumes of job seekers. In fact, a number of companies have already made video resume a compulsory thing in their job description. So, if you have not yet created a personalized video of your career description, it is about time to shoot a video long enough to demonstrate your professional skills and personal traits.

6. Referral hiring will take the lead

Referral hiring cuts down on the recruitment budget that employers have to bear with traditional hiring. With every passing year, it is emerging as a primary source of hiring workers. If implemented effectively, the referral hiring can significantly save the time and money of a company. As companies come to realize the valuable benefits of this form of hiring, more businesses will be investing in referral programs to hire talent.

2016 is a happening year for job seekers. Get ready for the above-mentioned six trends to make your way to a successful career transition this year.

Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

Kaelynn Bailee, guest writer

  Kaelynn Bailee is a HR manager working for a new start up that provides both educators and learners a platform to meet and discuss everything education. She also loves blogging and from time to time writes for other blogs.