ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 14, 2019 by

Does Griggs v. Duke Power Co. prohibit the use of artificial intelligence in hiring?

One of the many things that I learned two months ago at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI at Google that College Recruiter organized and Google hosted was that employers need to be very, very careful about how they use artificial intelligence in their hiring decisions. Unfortunately, in a rush to make as much money as possible, many AI vendors are selling these employers on the efficiency of the technology and not adequately addressing the potential liability being created from the use and misuse of the technology.

One of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decisions was Griggs v. Duke Power Co., 401 U.S. 424 (1971), which made illegal a company’s employment requirements which did not pertain to an employee’s ability to perform the job if those requirements had the effect of disparately impacting African-Americans and other ethnic minorities. Duke Power had argued that requiring a high school degree for its higher paid jobs was not discriminatory because it applied the same requirement to all applicants regardless of race. The Court, however, recognized that a high school degree was not needed to perform the work and negatively impacted the ability of African-Americans to be hired because fewer of them had high school degrees.

So, what does this have to do with artificial intelligence? Turns out, a lot. The typical implementation of an AI hiring tool involves the employer uploading resumes and other data for its best employees and then telling the technology to find more people like that. On the surface, that makes sense. “Our best salespeople all came to us after selling cars, so our new AI hiring technology will find car salespeople for us.”

But what if your hiring practices in the past have been discriminatory — perhaps unintentionally — and so your AI recommends more of the same candidates? For example, what if your best salespeople all had college degrees and so your AI only found or recommended salespeople with college degrees? A lot of employers — too many employers — would argue that would be a good thing. But would it be? What if you can’t prove that having a college degree pertains to their ability to sell? And what if, as is the case, those with college degrees are far more likely to be Caucasian or Asian than African-American, Hispanic, or Native American? What if your engineers are all male and so your AI disregards females?

Artificial intelligence may prove to be one of the greatest advances in our history, but we must be careful with how we use it. And whether the matching technology being touted by your other job board partner is powered by AI or not, be equally as cautious about it and for the same reasons. Do you know how that job board determines which candidates are a good match? Do you know for sure that it isn’t inadvertently discriminating against women? Minorities? Veterans? Disabled?

Posted February 07, 2019 by

AI, Algorithms, and Who Owns the Outcome

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our closing keynote was delivered by John Sumser, Principal Analyst for HRExaminer, an independent analyst firm covering HR technology and the intersection of people, tech, and work.

(more…)

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

(more…)

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Why should I use a job board to recruit students and recent graduates?

 

A potential customer of College Recruiter just asked a great question of our sales team. We’re trying to convince them to advertise their internships on our job search site as we know from experience that we will deliver an excellent return on investment to them. Quite simply, their profile is a perfect fit: Fortune 1,000 employer with thousands of employees and they hire hundreds of students and recent graduates a year.

So, what’s the problem? As a good, potential customer does, they communicated their key concern or, as a salesperson would call it, objection. The customer, through their advertising agency, said that they don’t advertise their internship roles because they hire all of them through on-campus, career fairs. Our response:

(more…)

Posted January 09, 2019 by

Identifying talent through internships and co-ops ranked as most important by employers of students and recent grads

A pretty common question that we get at College Recruiter is, “What do employers care about?” Sometimes, candidates are asking because they want to know how they can become better qualified or better communication their existing skillset. And sometimes we’re asked by other employers who are considering creating or improving their college and university relations programs.

A recent survey of employer members of the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) indicated that those mostly large employers are most concerned with their early identification of candidates and their branding efforts. “Identifying talent early through internships and co-ops was rated the highest, with 94.9 percent of respondents indicating it is “very” or “extremely” important. Trailing slightly was branding their organization to campuses, as 90.2 percent indicated it is “very” or “extremely” important. Other factors of high importance were diversity (87.4 percent) and measuring the results of their university relations and recruiting program (83.5 percent).”

(more…)

Posted August 24, 2018 by

Age discrimination: Over 40 and interviewing

 

Let’s talk about the issues that 40+ year olds are facing in the job market today. Almost 20% of all college and university students — about four million — are over the age of 35. So why do we automatically think of a bunch of 20 something’s when we hear “recent graduates”? This is also often the image that comes to mind for talent acquisition teams and is used to discriminate against older candidates. Jo Weech, Founder and Principal Consultant at Exemplary Consultants, explains the major problems that this misconception creates.

Exemplary Consultants provides business management consulting to small businesses and start-ups. Weech got involved in the process because she truly believes that work can be better for every person on the planet. She published an article back in July that got a ton of traffic, likes, and comments. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, had a conversation with her about some of her experiences, where the article came from, and some of the lessons that came from it. The lessons learned are not only useful for job seekers, but for those in talent acquisition as well. (more…)

Posted August 13, 2018 by

Your Affirmative Action Plan’s focus on compensation, and 6 common mistakes

 

If your organization has built or is building an Affirmation Action Plan, Tamara Seiler has great insight for government contractors to comply with requirements and compete for government funding, as well as leverage the data you are required to collect to improve your recruitment efforts. Seiler is Director of Compliance and Marketing Strategy at HudsonMann, and she is very familiar with challenges and trends related to affirmative action.  (more…)

Aircraft engine in hanger

Posted July 11, 2018 by

What Delta Air Lines is doing to address talent gaps 

When Delta Air Lines looks into the future, they see a shortage of talent in a particular area. That is, they know many pilots will be retiring and there aren’t enough new pilots in the pipeline to replace them. Filling mechanic roles is also an area where Delta predicts a talent shortage. We spoke with John Patrick, who is Senior Manager of Academic Strategy at Delta. He told us more about how they are responding to this talent gap with unique recruiting and branding strategies.

(more…)

Posted July 03, 2018 by

Preparing young women for gender inequality in the workplace

Career Resources Specialist Laveda Joseph has been noticing that at Wake Technical Community College, her female students are often unaware of the gender inequality that exists in the “real” world. Despite recent momentum toward equal pay, and the #MeToo movement, Joseph doesn’t see awareness increasing on campus. Anne Tomkinson, Senior Manager of Human Resources and Operations at D.C. Public Charter School Board, shares Joseph’s passion for helping young women prepare for the realities of the workplace. That’s not to say they accept status quo. On the contrary—the advice they share here should help young women advocate for themselves, build their confidence, and understand how to react when faced with inequality.

(more…)

Posted May 25, 2018 by

Job search advice for students and grads with disabilities

 

By day, Dan Cross is the Talent Acquisition Strategy Manager at Capital One. But a role he always embraces night and day is disability advocate. We posed a few questions to him and he gave some insightful tips for students and grads with disabilities who are job seeking. We share his advice below. Cross is outspoken about HR issues and trends (find him on Twitter @CrossOverHR), and was named an official SHRM 2018 blogger.  (more…)