• Selecting and Qualifying the Right Job Board Partners

    February 09, 2019 by

    “It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” – Napolean Hill

    Mission Possible

    Many companies craft mission statements that help guide the way they do business and create a certain company culture. Unfortunately, surveys show that these statements have very little influence on how many companies actually do business.

    According to Wikipedia, a mission statement is intended to “guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path and the framework or context within which the company’s strategies are formulated.” That sounds noble – and even essential – for a successful company, and yet, in the daily hustle to meet customer needs, hit business targets and respond to competitive threats, these “guiding principles” are often the first things to slip. So, we understand why many people are skeptical about their value.

    However, research also shows that the most successful companies are those that have teams focused around a common purpose and have deeply socialized guiding principles. They accomplish this by putting them into practice every day instead of letting them gather dust in a binder or simply serve as wall decorations.

    What’s more, the most outstanding companies have “outward facing” principles, which means they have guidelines not just for creating a positive corporate culture, but also for how they interact with their customers. When deciding on a supplier or vendor, for any aspect of your business, including job boards and other recruitment vendors, it’s important to understand what motivates them and guides their actions.

    Partnerships vs. Suppliers

    For the most part, the “supplier-customer” relationship is straightforward. The supplier provides the product or service that the customer needs. And, the customer chooses a supplier based on price, features, quality, service levels, etc. But what if we take this relationship to the next level?

    For instance, instead of viewing a recruitment services vendor as simply a supplier of candidates, begin to think of them as your partner – someone who is striving to help your business succeed by providing the right candidates for the right positions. In order to do this effectively, the vendor needs to know more than just the job description. They must understand the company/industry, the culture, the challenges, the “real” requirements, and more. This necessitates a partnership.

    The difference between a supplier and a true partner is that partnerships are built through:

    • Transparency, candor, and empathy – There is trust, which is built on open, honest communications and a desire to understand your business and its needs.
    • Collaboration – Which requires active listening in order to discover how to bring more value to the relationship and tailor services to meet client needs.
    • Accountability – Partners want to exceed expectations, provide measurable results and offer performance guarantees.

    Creating Value for our Partners

    Let’s face it, one-way relationships are not very fulfilling. At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And, we believe that a strong partnership with our customers must be two-way – with each party holding the other accountable for upholding their side of the “bargain” We understand that establishing mutually beneficial relationships with our partners – whether they are employers, advertising agencies, recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) organizations or universities – is critical to our success and yours.

    “We think you’ll find working with College Recruiter to be like a breath of fresh air,” said Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer. “We believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience, and we’re passionate about the customer experience. We want to be more than just a ‘supplier’ – we sincerely want to form a lasting partnership with those we work with.”

    At College Recruiter, we value:

    • Honesty and integrity
    • Enthusiasm, tenacity, and fun
    • Unparalleled customer experiences
    • Critical thinking and problem solving
    • Teamwork and collaboration
    • Continuous improvements

    Doesn’t that sound like a company you’d like to partner with? Of course, actions speak louder than words. That’s why we stand behind our job postings, targeted emails, mobile banners, and display banner ads, and guarantee results for clients. From our management team and advisory board to our content panel and our employees, we select people who share our values. And, whether its targeted emails or job postings, branding campaigns or diversity solutions, College Recruiter delivers for our partners.

    In fact, we have a long list of client partners that love us! Listen to what they have to say:

    “We run job posting ads on a lot of sites but had never used College Recruiter until we purchased an unlimited job posting package a month ago. We were amazed at the high quantity and quality of responses that we received. After only two days, we had a positive return on our investment for the entire month.” –Leapforce, Inc.

    “The support that you provide is outstanding. Thanks!” — Recruitment Center, Central Intelligence Agency

    “We’ve tried several ways to recruit college students for our entry-level positions including job postings on other leading college job boards. None worked well so we were skeptical when first approached by College Recruiter… (Your) approach in having the job posted to our area rather than to a handful of schools proved to generate far more responses than the postings on the other sites…it really works!!!!” — Sequoia Financial

    “College Recruiter has been working as a great resource for our Talent Acquisition team! Our inbox has been flooded with applications from quality candidates, a bit overwhelming but we will take it!” — University Relations and Recruiting Coordinator, HGST, a Western Digital Company

    “I was completely blown away by College Recruiter’s data and analytics.” — Kara Yarnot, member of College Recruiter’s board of advisors and former head of talent acquisition for SAIC and college relations for Boeing

    Making a Match

    At the risk of sounding cliché, finding the right job board partner can be a bit like dating. You have basic requirements, but since a great recruiter needs to know your company or agency quite intimately, there are other aspects to consider when forming a partnership, such as:

    • Is there chemistry?
    • Do their values align with yours?
    • Are they well-managed and ethical?
    • Do they listen more than they talk? (No one likes a date who talks about himself/herself all night!)
    • Are they responsive?
    • Do they offer any type of guarantees?
    • Are they willing to offer references or direct contact with other customers?

    Whether you work with College Recruiter or another job board, be sure to find the right fit for you. This will not only lead to a higher quantity and quality of applicants but also savings in both time and money over the long-term.

    If you’d like to connect and talk about partnerships opportunities, visit http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/home or call 952-848-2211.

     

    College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

  • Onboarding new employees starts before first day on job

    May 02, 2017 by

     

    A new employee who is not onboarded the right way is going to have difficulty finding a sense of belonging inside an organization, says Scott Redfearn, executive vice president of global HR at Protiviti, a global business consulting and internal audit firm.

    “Employees who don’t have a meaningful career experience aren’t going to last, and they will not perform to their full potential,” says Redfearn. Continue Reading

  • How new OT laws affect compensation for recent grads, employers

    June 03, 2016 by
    New OT laws - compensation

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Note: This is the third article in a series of articles focusing on the new overtime laws. Read the first two articles in this series – how the new overtime laws will affect interns and recent grads and how the new overtime laws will affect employers.

    The DOL’s increase to the FLSA’s minimum compensation limits is a game changer for many companies, says Joe Kager, Managing Consultant and founder of the POE Group, a Tampa, Florida-based management consulting firm that advises companies on becoming great places to work by developing reward systems that attract, motivate, and retain employees.

    Employers who have assigned an exempt status for jobs with compensation above the current minimum ($23,660), but below the new minimum of $47,475, will need to consider a variety of factors before the December 1, 2016, implementation date.

    Effect on food service and hospitality management jobs

    This will affect many lower level food service and hospitality management positions classified as exempt under the FLSA, says Kager. If the positions are to remain exempt, employers will need to raise compensation to the new minimum. This alternative may be appropriate for jobs that will be required to work substantial overtime. If a compensation increase to the new minimum is not feasible, employers will reclassify the positions as non-exempt and be required to pay overtime for hours worked over 40 in a week.

    Deciding the appropriate action will entail a comparison of the two alternatives based on historic hours worked. This could have an additional effect on employees.

    “There may be psychological issues to consider if employees have their positions changed from exempt to non-exempt, requiring good communication about the change,” says Kager. “This could be considered by some employees as a demotion.”

    How employers will classify recent college grads

    Kager says the Poe Group has advised clients to classify new college graduates as non-exempt, assuming they will not initially exercise discretion and independent judgement required in the administrative exemption test. Most college graduates hired into professional positions under the FLSA exemption, whose compensation is generally above the $47,475 minimum, says Kager.

    Dan Walter, President and CEO of Performensation, a management consulting firm that engages with leaders to create human capital strategy, compensation, and reward programs that drive firm performance, says he expects employers are going to be reactive to these new regulations.

    Walter discussed the short and long-term impact of how the new overtime laws will affect recent college grads and employers.

    Short-term impact of new overtime laws

    “It is likely that there will be little, if any, change in the amount of jobs available for college students and recent grads in the near term,” says Walter.

    Therefore, the short-term impact on companies, regardless of size, is that they will be required to do one or more of these things:

    • Raise pay: If they can afford to do so, employers will increase wages to people above the threshold in order to maintain exemption status.
    • Manage hours: Many companies won’t be able to effectively manage the time. The past trend is that nonexempt workers feel like they aren’t worth as much from the professional recognition standpoint. They may choose to leave their current position and be reclassified as non-exempt to a different company with the hope of feeling more valued.
    • Hire more: Some savvy companies will hire more nonexempt workers so fewer people will work overtime. This will likely occur in larger companies, who are disciplined and more experienced in forecasting and financial modeling. These companies will spend the time and money to make sure that the changes take place and are administered effectively.

    “Companies will find that in some groups it will be more cost effective to hire additional staff instead of paying for the overtime,” says Walter. “College recruiting will likely fill these newly created jobs.”

    Long-term impact of new overtime laws

    The combined impact of the economy and regulation will cause downward pressure on the creation of new entry level jobs due to companies redesigning roles, technology automation of non-exempt duties, and potential offshoring where possible.

    “This will occur despite the demographic shift in the workplace,” says Walter. “The retirement of the Baby Boomer generation will likely lead to a downward shift in consumer goods demand with a moderate uptick in services.

    The long-term impact of the new overtime laws will focus around these changes, says Walter:

    • Redesign jobs: There will be a move to redesign jobs to meet the 40 hours per week and reassign certain duties of those jobs onto someone else that is exempt.
    • Automation: Companies will be pushed more to the automation of certain duties to offset overtime costs. There will be an increase in companies using technology to automate lower-waged jobs.
    • Increase in offshoring: The effects will continue to add additional pressure to offshoring where possible. Moving jobs out of the United States will cut company costs.

    Walter provided analysis. “Now that the nonexempt employee population has increased significantly, it will be more critical that companies manage overtime expense and therefore the hours worked by these employees will need to be closely monitored. The employees with pay that is not near the threshold will have their hours restricted more. Conversely, those employees that are near the threshold will likely receive a pay increase to meet the new threshold and therefore their work hours will likely remain unchanged.”

    Effects on management trainees

    Walter uses a manager trainee as a simple example of this: If the manager trainee is near the threshold, he will find that the employer will increase their pay to meet the exemption. Therefore, employees that fall into this type of category will work the same amount of hours as in the past. However, for those manager trainees significantly below the threshold, they will find their hours reduced to manage the amount of overtime work.

    New overtime laws and small businesses

    The new law on overtime – anyone earning under $47,476 will be eligible for overtime – sounds great on paper, because it translates into a substantial raise for those working long hours, and that’s always a plus for the employee, says Vicky Oliver, a multi-best-selling author of five books, including 301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions (Sourcebooks 2005), named in the top 10 list of “Best Books for HR Interview Prep,” and 301 Smart Answers to Tough Business Etiquette Questions.

    But if the new law becomes cost-prohibitive for small businesses, look for some unanticipated side effects, such as businesses possibly “demoting” full-time staff positions to that of a part-time or freelance role in an effort to avoid the overtime rule.

    “Small businesses are responsible for the majority of new jobs,” says Oliver, a sought-after speaker and seminar presenter. “As always, it will be interesting to see how this particular rule shakes out. Some employers may find that reducing hours to side-step paying overtime will require creating new part-time or full-time positions.”

    For more career tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • How new overtime laws will affect employers

    May 31, 2016 by
    How the new overtime laws will affect employers

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    The new overtime laws that go in place on December 1, 2016 will impact 4.2 million workers who will either gain new overtime protections or get a raise to the new salary threshold.

    This is cause for concern for both employees trying to understand the new overtime laws as well as employers who are doing everything they can to understand how these changes affect their business, hiring plans, and compensation packages.

    It could result in big changes for those who aren’t prepared, says Stephania Bruha, Operations Manager at Kavaliro, a national staffing agency that employs IT professionals, management, and administrative staff.

     

    “We at Kavaliro expect to see many more of our clients limiting employees to 40 hours per week, or requiring executive approval to work overtime hours,” says Bruha. “Recent graduates and new employees may have an advantage here, as they are starting fresh and don’t have to overcome habits from the past.”

    Bruha recommends employers get in front of this change. “We will be reassessing our employees more than a month before the new overtime laws go into effect to ensure that if status changes take place, they are well adjusted prior to the go-live date,” says Bruha.

    Communication will be key, as in all HR and hiring matters, to ensure your employees understand how they could be affected.

    “The worst thing that could happen is for your employees to misinterpret policies and think you are saying they are not allowed to report more than 40 hours a week,” says Bruha. “This is especially important for people who are new to the workforce, like new college grads, who may not know their rights, or have a little experience with labor laws. Employees need to know that you must report all hours worked, but they also need to understand if their company has set requirements for time entry.  Your employer may have severe penalties for violating the policy related to timekeeping because it is so strictly regulated by the Department of Labor.”

    Small and mid-sized employers are going to take a hit

    Employers – particularly small and mid-sized employers – are going to take a hit with the new regulations, says Kate Bischoff, a human resources professional and employment/labor law attorney with the Minneapolis office of Zelle LLP, an international litigation and dispute resolution law firm. Bischoff is co-leading a June 2, 2016, webinar titled Preparing for Changes to FLSA Overtime Regulations, discussing this topic and more. They will need to raise salaries over the $913 per week threshold or pay overtime.

    “This may mean employers hire more people so the need for overtime is less or they raise the costs of their products and services to cover the additional labor costs,” says Bischoff.

    New grads or interns looking for work typically don’t wonder whether their first post-grad job will be paid on an exempt (salaried) or a non-exempt (hourly) basis, points out Arlene Vernon, an HR consultant who works with small business owners and corporate clients providing HR strategy and management training. And it’s probably not a consideration regarding whether or not they take a particular job opportunity. However, since a new grad may find himself choosing between two job opportunities, employers need to realize that competitors may change how they present salary and compensation packages based on the new overtime laws, which in turn cold affect the decision an employee makes when deciding between two companies or job offers.

    Exempt versus non-exempt employment offers

    Let’s say Company A offers the grad $48,000 per year as an exempt position, and Company B offers the grad $46,000 as a non-exempt position. There is the potential that the resulting annual pay under Company B could be higher than Company A if the employee works overtime.  If the person is choosing a job based solely on compensation, this would be a consideration.  However, the real decision is whether the job is the right fit for the person, not whether the employee is eligible for overtime.

    “From an employer perspective, all companies, including those hiring new grads, need to re-evaluate all their positions paying less than $47,476 to determine how to handle any job reclassifications to non-exempt status,” says Vernon. “This could impact all or some incumbents in jobs paying around this new limit.”

    In making someone hourly, companies are not required to merely take employees’ salaries and divide them by 2080 to get an equivalent hourly rate.  Many companies will assess what overtime the person might be working and recalculate the hourly rate so that when the employee works overtime the employee’s final pay equals the full salaried amount, says Vernon, admitting that this can get confusing.  But in this scenario, the employee may be making less per hour, but the same or even more on an annual basis when you factor in overtime, depending on the employer’s approach.

    Some companies will be giving certain employees raises to bring them to $47,476 and keep them as salaried. “This may ultimately cost the employer less money than paying overtime at the lower wage,” says Vernon.

    Employers must educate employees

    Employers should educate employees who are moving from exempt to non-exempt on what work can and cannot be performed outside of regular work hours, adds Vernon. Exempt employees are accustomed to answering texts and emails at night and during weekends.  They may work whatever hours are needed to get the job done.  As a non-exempt employee, they must track and get paid for any non-scheduled hours worked which will increase their pay, but may be against company policy. Typically hourly employees don’t get to randomly create their own work schedules, while salaried employees do.

    “This practice needs to be unlearned by managers and employees,” says Vernon.

    For example, are managers who email the now-hourly employees at night and over the weekend now authorizing the employee to respond to the email and inadvertently approving overtime?  Or do managers need to learn to save employee communication for the work week to control payroll costs?

    These are among the many changes, challenges and questions employers are sorting out.

    “December 1 will be here before we know it,” says Vernon. “This change will have considerable impact on all employers no matter their size and whether or not they hire one or more grads below, at or above the new FLSA range.”

    For more career tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

    Ready to begin your job search? Start at College Recruiter today!

  • How new overtime laws will affect interns and recent grads

    May 27, 2016 by
    How the new overtime laws will affect recent college graduates

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    How will the new overtime laws affect interns and recent grads? A variety of experts weigh in on this hot topic.

    Changes to overtime laws

    The Department of Labor expects the new overtime laws to affect 4.2 million workers – many of whom are likely new college grads out on their first “real” job.  As of December 1, 2016, the days of working 50+ hours a week and earning $35,000 should be gone, says Kate Bischoff, a human resources professional and employment/labor law attorney with the Minneapolis office of Zelle LLP, an international litigation and dispute resolution law firm. Bischoff is co-leading a June 2, 2016, webinar titled Preparing for Changes to FLSA Overtime Regulations, discussing this topic and more.

    Salary versus hourly

    There’s one thing college graduates should keep in mind, says Bischoff, and that is that salary has nothing to do with status.

    “Being paid a salary doesn’t mean that an employee is more valuable to his or her employer than an hourly employee,” says Bischoff. “It is simply a different way of paying people for their work.”

    Those who are nonexempt – those eligible for overtime – may earn time and a half when they work long hours and may even earn more than their salaried brethren, points out Bischoff. Those who are exempt and earn more than $913 a week will not be compensated for their long hours in the office in the form of hourly payments. In fact, when some employees shift from salaried to hourly, many times, they earn more as an hourly employee.

    The other thing about being paid on an hourly basis is that employers need to know how much you work, says Bischoff. With apps on smartphones and smart watches, employees can now track their time easier than ever before. “If you track your steps, you can track your hours,” says Bischoff. “The fact that you have to punch in or clock out only means you need to capture your time to get paid the value of your work. That’s all.”

    Ask questions to clarify status

    So what should college grads do and consider before accepting a job, or if they have questions about their current and future employment status at their existing job? Ask questions such as these, says Bischoff:

    • What will their overtime status be?
    • Will this position be eligible for overtime?
    • Will I be paid a salary?

    “For many college grads, work-life balance is important, so ask if you will be able to make it to your volunteer activity every Thursday evening,” says Bischoff. “While asking if you will ‘have to’ work overtime may be a signal to an employer that you might not be a dedicated employee, you can ask about particular events or activities important to you. You may glean from the answer the amount of hours you will put in.”

    What do the new overtime laws mean for interns?

    Currently, the vast majority of interns earn less than the $23,660 DOL threshold and therefore are classified as non-exempt and qualify for overtime. When the new rules take effect on December 1, 2016, the threshold will almost double to $50,440. The number of interns who earn between $23,660 and $50,440 is miniscule and, therefore, the law will directly impact virtually no interns, says Steven Rothberg, founder of College Recruiter. That said, there could be a substantial impact on new grad hiring as virtually all new grads earn more than $23,660, the average is about $46,000, and a substantial minority earn more than the $50,440.

    “At College Recruiter, we believe that the law will have a substantial impact on the number of hours worked by management trainees and other such workers who have traditionally been paid as exempt, salaried employees with no ability to earn overtime pay yet who routinely work far more than the standard 40-hour work week,” says Rothberg. “Employers will likely instruct these employees not to work more than 40-hours per week, which will effectively increase the compensation paid to and reduce the return on investment generated from these employees. Yet with a tightening labor market, more Baby Boomers retiring, and fewer Millennials graduating, it is unlikely that there will be any noticeable change in the number of recent grads finding employment within their chosen career paths.”

    Manufacturing director: New OT laws could hurt interns and recent grads

    John Johnston is Director of Manufacturing at States Manufacturing, a Minneapolis-based custom electrical and precision fabricated metal company with 49 employees.

    He fears the new overtime laws will hurt interns and new hires, namely those graduating from college or technical schools.

    “I would expect the starting wage to decrease to compensate for the change in overtime rules,” says Johnston. “Also, I would tend to expect the opportunities to reduce as well as the patience of employers. If we are going to pay more, we are going to raise our expectations and be less patient with someone because of the wage they are earning. When we have had lower wage earners at the start of their career, we are able to be more patient in part because the issues are not as magnified with a lesser wage. Once that increases, we have no choice but to be tougher that much quicker.”

    Johnston said his company may avoid hiring interns in the future due to the increased costs and instead balance it with multiple part-time employees. The company currently does not have any interns, partly because they were sorting out the details of the new labor and overtime laws.

    “I see this as a trend to save on escalating costs since benefits would not be required with part-time employees,” says Johnston.

    A ripple effect for college grads

    Elliot D. Lasson, Ph.D., SPHR, SHRM-SCP, is an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in Rockville, Maryland and a Human Capital Consultant with Lasson Talent Solutions. Lasson regularly presents to students on behalf of college career centers.

    According to Lasson, the new overtime regulations will have ripple affects all around.

    “Students who are in college or right out of college want to gain meaningful experience,” he said. “They are not paying all that money to be flipping burgers or driving for Uber after graduation. The conventional wisdom is that internships are valuable. And they objectively are. However, many employers misappropriate that label to justify in order to get free labor from students who feel desperate for that experience. In many cases, internships play out in a way where the students are gaining only minimal exposure to the workplace and field, while at the same time are not getting paid.”

    The Department of Labor previously identified six conditions that must be met in order to permit unpaid internship scenarios. “Many employers play fast and loose with these under the pretense that the work environment itself is more important than it objectively is,” says Lasson. And now, this extends to graduate school as well. The grad students are still “students” and therefore unlike their undergraduate peers who are not in graduate school can still “qualify” to be unpaid interns while in graduate school.  So, there is additional abuse of the system here as well, says Lasson.

    “With the popularity of unpaid internships, many employers are inundated with requests and may just take advantage of students without having a handle on the DOL guidelines,” says Lasson.

    For more career tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • Fraudulent job postings: TATech Industry Congress

    March 23, 2016 by

    In today’s job board industry, fraudulent job postings are a real threat to both job seekers and talent acquisition professionals. TATech, the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions, is confronting that threat head-on in various ways.

    One of the ways TATech is rising to the challenges posed by fraudulent job postings is by offering solutions to members of the job board industry. At the upcoming TATech Industry Congress event in Orlando, Florida (April 16-17, 2016), College Recruiter’s CEO Faith Rothberg will moderate a panel discussion on this very topic. This article and embedded video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, with guests Faith Rothberg and TATech Vice President Pete Weddle, discusses the importance and relevance of Faith’s panel discussion topic, “Fraudulent postings: Why protecting users protects your business.”


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    First, Pete Weddle provides viewers who may be unfamiliar with TATech a little background on the organization. TATech, formerly the IAEWS (International Assocation of Employment Websites), has its roots in job boards. It has evolved as the industry has evolved. The association includes almost any organization providing technology and services that help facilitate the talent acquisition process. Collectively, the TATech membership powers over 60,000 sites or applications.

    The TATech Industry Congress is the only industry-focused event in 2016. At this event, Faith Rothberg, CEO of College Recruiter, will moderate a panel discussion on a hot topic in the job board industry. The title of Faith Rothberg’s panel discussion is “Fraudulent postings: Why protecting users protects your business.” Faith explains that the panel discussion will cover everything from how fraudulent postings can occur, how businesses can prevent them from occurring, and how business owners/recruiters can keep them to a minimum. The panel will cover criminal intent, technological solutions, and enhancing the candidate experience.

    Fraudulent job postings have become more of a problem lately because scammers have figured out ways to automate attacks on job posting sites to steal personal information. This can lead to problems for candidates when searching for jobs online. This can lead to more severe impacts on candidates, including identity theft. Scammers have become highly educated in this process.

    Pete Weddle adds that he regularly hears from talent acquisition professionals who are concerned about this problem; he is very excited about hosting this panel discussion at the TATech Industry Congress.

    Faith believes that TATech is truly helping the job board industry to better equip themselves to handle this problem through the TRUEad program. TATech created the TRUEad program in response to this issue. It is a centralized place to report fraudulent job postings and to gain awareness about fraudulent job postings.

    For more information about the TATech Industry Congress or the TRUEad program, visit the TATech website.

    Have you followed College Recruiter’s blog? Follow us today to receive links to articles like this. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

  • What is career counseling

    March 05, 2016 by
    Photo of Veranda Hillard-Charleston

    Veranda Hillard-Charleston, guest writer

    Do people believe their current career trajectories feel like a hopeless game of grasping at straws? Maybe they’ve been thinking, “I don’t know what I want to do with my life” or “I don’t know what jobs I can get with my major/degree.” Having a long list of “I don’t knows” in the career department certainly doesn’t lead to increased life satisfaction. Luckily, there’s a solution: career counseling.

    What is career counseling?

    Career counseling is a goal-oriented process targeted at helping people gain better insight about themselves and what they want out of their careers, education, and lives.

    According to Boise State University, the counseling element is one-step in a lifelong process of career development. Therefore, the object of career counseling is not to guide people in making better career decisions today. Instead, the focus of this process is to equip people with the self-knowledge and expertise needed to improve their careers and life decisions over their lifespan.

    A career counselor is generally a master’s level professional with a background in career development theory, counseling methods, assessments, and employment information and resources. A professional will hold a confidential session with people to identify their unique values, interests, skills, career-related strengths and weaknesses, and personal goals in order to determine which resources they require and which course of action is most appropriate in helping them achieve these goals.

    A career counselor can even help people separate their own career-related goals from those of others, such as parents, teachers, and friends who may be pressuring them to choose a specific career path.

    Do I need career counseling?

    Whether they’re freshmen in college or five years post-graduate, college students and recent graduates can benefit from the services of a career counselor. Since career development is a lifelong process – and people’s interests and skills are steadily changing – the earlier they gain insight about themselves and learn how to make career-related decisions, the better. If job seekers’ current dialogue is filled with “I don’t knows,” career counseling is a smart choice for them.

    Possible career counseling for bank credit presentation of important issues courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    frechtoch/Shutterstock.com

    Maximizing from the counseling experience

    So college students and recent graduates made the choice to get career counseling and scheduled an appointment. Their part is done, right? Wrong. A common misconception about career counseling is people show up, and an expert tells them exactly what career choices are best for them. In truth, career counseling is not a one-sided, quick solution to academic or career dilemmas. Consider the following:

    • Job seekers are not simply there to receive. The counseling experience requires participation. An honest examination of job seekers is vital for the career counselor to guide them in the right direction. Together, they might uncover their career interests, but they must take action to continue down the right path.

    • People must narrow down their goals. Coming in with a broad desire to “Figure out what they want in life” just won’t cut it. A clear-cut objective is necessary so each session has structure and both parties can tell when their work together is complete.

    • Job seekers have to continue the career development process beyond counseling. A good career counselor can help them define their interests and values, identify goals, and provide resources and strategies for reaching these goals. Still, the important work is done by job seekers. They have to actually use these resources to pinpoint internships or job opportunities appealing to them and constantly consider how different opportunities match their interests, values, and skills.

    Career counseling offers people a safe and confidential place to explore their career passions and identify areas in which they are experiencing difficulty. It is a collaborative relationship – the client and the counselor work together to discover the client’s true career goals and work to overcome any obstacles. However, the client must be devoted to career development and willing to do the work to truly benefit from the experience.

    If you want more career advice, go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

    Veranda Hillard-Charleston is Chief Contributor for MastersinPsychologyGuide.com. She received her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern State University of Louisiana. Veranda has more than five years of experience as a trained mental health professional.

  • Focusing on branding in college recruiting

    February 26, 2016 by

    In recruiting college students, recruiters should focus on employer branding. An employer brand represents what a company stands for; it’s why or why not job seekers will work for a business. Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency, explains how his company recruits college students with care and dedication.

    Photo of Brian Easter

    Brian Easter, Co-Founder of Nebo Agency

    “Nebo’s success has been a direct result of our human-centered approach to doing business. It’s because we respect users we’re able to craft successful, long-term strategies for clients over short-term gains; it’s because we love and value clients we build lasting relationships with them; and it’s because we see culture as our competitive advantage we’ve been able to fill the Nebo ranks with the industry’s best people.

    As such, we fiercely defend our culture by standing up for our employees at all times. We will fire and have fired clients on the spot when they question the value of our employees’ hard work. Like we’ve always said, Nebo was started to repair a broken industry, and it’s a goal we have in mind at every step.

    We’d put the growth opportunities at Nebo against any other agency. More than half of our management positions are staffed by people who started as interns or in entry-level positions. We promote from within to maintain our culture, and we think it’s important to reward good work. We hire people who have potential to grow with the agency, meaning they are passionate, intelligent, have integrity, and want to make the world a better place. We hire people who have a greater mission. Nebo promotes based on merit and does not withhold promotions to make new employees “pay their dues.”

    This manner of care and dedication to our employees translates to how we recruit and attract college students to Nebo. We are actively involved with a number of southeastern colleges, particularly the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech, in part because of their vicinities to our Atlanta office, but also because we are an office divided with proud Bulldawg and Jacket grads. Throughout the year, we attend career fairs, advertising, marketing, and PR organizational events, as well as host agency tours.

    Whenever we plan an appearance at a college event, we don’t settle for just distributing basic fliers. We want our presence to reflect our unique culture at Nebo. Whether that means a contest guessing the number of jelly beans in a jar, giving away a drone or scholarship money to someone with the most compelling tweet, or personalizing t-shirts to embrace each school, we want students to know we are as excited to be there as they are. We always strive to provide every student with a remarkable experience with the Nebo brand.

    Every year, Nebo receives thousands of resumes with a large majority from current college students, so we like to think our approach to engaging college students is working. We’ve made it our mission to create a place where the industry’s top talent comes together to help clients make the world a better place.”

    At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

    As Co-Founder of Nebo, Brian Easter brings international experience to his role along with a proven track record of helping organizations reach their digital marketing objectives. Under his leadership, Nebo has enjoyed 12 straight years of growth, has never laid a single employee off, and has won over 100 digital awards in just the past years alone.

  • Recruiting and training HVACR technicians

    February 22, 2016 by
    An HVAC technician searching for a refrigerant leak on an evaporator coil courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    David Spates/Shutterstock.com

    Attracting HVACR (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration) technicians and instructors has been challenging for recruiters and hiring managers. There is an opportunity to get college students and recent graduates interested in HVACR jobs if their recruitment and training efforts are strong.

    The next generation of Americans, Generation Z students, are about to enter the workforce, and many Gen Z students are unaware of the opportunities available in the HVACR career field.

    The oldest of Gen Z students are to complete high school. Some will enter the military or the workforce, and most will attend a one, two, or four-year college or university. The oldest of Gen Z was about 10 years old at the height of the Great Recession and spent most of their formative years witnessing and, in many cases, suffering from the financial turmoil. As compared to their Gen X parents at the same age, Gen Z’ers are far more likely to favor career paths with low student loan debt, opportunities for advancement within their organizations, work/life balance, and a good, stable, living wage.

    Trades such as HVACR provide all of those benefits, but few young adults are aware of that fact. More than anything else, the industry needs better marketing of its career opportunities. It should make a concerted effort to deliver presentations in the nation’s high schools, just as the military and some other professions do.

    “One option for HVACR industry leaders is to live stream informational presentations on YouTube to build a massive and therefore search engine friendly repository of these presentations and have the presentations delivered by recent graduates of those schools. Graduates can share their stories including their challenges. Authenticity and peer-to-peer communication matters greatly to young adults. A message that everything is great or a great message delivered by a Baby Boomer will not resonate,” notes College Recruiter’s President and Founder, Steven Rothberg.

    Another way to recruit HVACR technicians and instructors is to have the employers work with educators on developing strategies to qualified students. They can also collaborate on encouraging these students to enroll in training programs, which will create a workforce in waiting. In order to train more technicians and instructors, one option is establishing financial support through local and regional employers in the career field to create training programs.

    College students and recent grads can be potential candidates for jobs as HVACR technicians and instructors. However, there must be a more proactive approach when it comes to recruiting and training.

    At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career, and we are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to great careers. Let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook for more information about the best practices in college recruiting.

  • 3 weeks until the Graduates Employment Conference Europe in Brussels

    November 11, 2015 by
    Hotel Leopold in Brussels, Belgium

    Hotel Leopold in Brussels, Belgium

    Earlier this year College Recruiter partnered with European-based Gradcore, Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR), and European Association for International Education (EMPLOI) to create the Graduate Employment Conference Europe (GEC Europe). We’re now only three weeks away from the December 2nd and 3rd conference.

    The conference is bringing together a remarkable group of senior university relations leaders, talent acquisition heads, graduate recruiters, and university employability leaders from at least 14 countries and the continents of Europe, North America, and Asia. We’ll gather at The Hotel Leopold the evening of Wednesday, December 2nd for a wonderful dinner and then at the British Ambassador’s residence on Thursday, December 3rd for two keynotes and a panel discussion in the morning and then break-out sessions in the afternoon. Continue Reading