ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 08, 2020 by

How to recruit employees with Asperger’s Syndrome

Conferences can be tremendous opportunities to learn, but too many conferences cover the same topics over and over and over again and sometimes it is even the same presentation by the same speaker. But not always. Sometimes, the topic is new to the attendees, or presented in a markedly different manner.  

At our College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY, our 17th employer user conference, our featured presenter was Jo Weech, President & CEO of Exemplary Consultants. Jo shared with the 125 talent acquisition leaders in the room plus several hundred watching the livestream how and why leading employers are reaching out to candidates with Asperger’s Syndrome not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes business sense to do it.

After her presentation, Jo was joined on the stage by panelists:

  • Keca Ward, Senior Director of Talent Acquisition for Phenom People;
  • Jon Kestenbaum, Executive Director of Talent Tech Labs;
  • Janine Truitt, Member of College Recruiter’s content expert board and Chief Innovations Officer for Talent Think Innovations; and
  • Lois Barth, Principal and Human Development Expert for Lois Barth Coaching & Consulting Services.

Are you debating whether to recruit people with Asperger’s or struggling to retain them? Watch the one-hour video:

Want to learn more about how College Recruiter helps Fortune 1,000 companies, government agencies, and other employers who hire at scale reach diverse candidates, including those with Asperger’s? Go to http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/advertising2 or email us at Sales@CollegeRecruiter.com.

Courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted January 06, 2020 by

Is your job application process turning off top talent?

At job search site College Recruiter, we’re seeing far fewer employers with horrifically cumbersome application processes A decade ago when employers had their pick of talent, it wasn’t at all unusual for a candidate for an entry-level job to be forced to spend 20, 30, even 40 minutes applying to a job and having to hand over a wealth of highly personal and sensitive information knowing that it was incredibly unlikely that they would even hear back from the employer, let alone be hired.

Today, only the most stubborn of employers believes that it is a good thing to put candidates through a process like that, but the vast majority could and should be doing far better. Very few talent acquisition professionals have a lot of marketing experience, but those who do understand that a job application is to employment marketing what a sales lead is to consumer marketing. A car deal would never ask a prospective buyer to spend 30-minutes filling in page after page of information if interested in buying a car. Instead, the marketer gathers only the information that they need to properly qualify the buyer and not one question more. There are many questions that the marketer needs to ask, but not at the lead generation point and so they hold off on asking those questions until later in the process. 

In contrast, too many in HR justify asking questions during the application (lead generation) process because that information will be needed if the person is hired, but the effect is to ask these questions of 100 candidates who convert into five well-qualified applicants who convert into one hire. The questions are typically important, but not to those who are mere leads. The questions should be asked only of the five finalists and perhaps only of those who received job offers. By asking these questions too early in the sales process, HR kills the click-to-apply conversion rate and so needs to spend far more time, money, and other resources generating far more leads in order to overcome their poor conversion rates.

So, what benchmarks might an employer look to in order to gauge whether they’re asking too many questions or, perhaps, not the correct questions during the application process? Historically, most of our employer customers, when pressed, will admit that they do not track how many candidates view their job postings and so they don’t know their click-to-apply rate. In other words, they don’t know how many candidates they need to drive to their job posting ads in order to generate enough applications that they’ll hire the people they’ll need. Even fewer employers know how many apply starts they see, meaning how many candidates start but don’t complete the application form.

The good news is that the majority of our employer customers now know how many apply to their jobs, so at least they have a good handle on how many people tend to apply for each person they hire. And even more know how many quality applications they tend to receive as they tend to equate interviews with quality and that should be a pretty easy metric to pull from an applicant tracking system.

What are some typical metrics? For every 100 people who see your job posting ad, somewhere between five and 10 will apply. The shorter your application process, the higher that percentage will be. The more attractive the position, the higher that percentage will be. If you can increase your click-to-apply rate from five to 10 percent, you’ll only need to attract half as many candidates to your opportunity, which will greatly reduce your effective cost per application and time-to-hire, both of which will improve the bottom line of your organization.

Posted December 24, 2019 by

Innovative ways quick-service restaurants and other small business owners are recruiting candidates for low-wage jobs

Almost inevitably, when I speak with owners and operators of quick-service restaurants or other businesses that rely on relatively low-paid, hourly workers, they complain about the shortage of talent and the resulting difficulty in recruiting employees. But when you scratch the surface, they actually don’t have a recruitment problem. They have a retention problem. They’re always recruiting because they’re failing to retain.

A typical quick-service restaurant (QSR) employee has a tenure of three months, which means that the employer must hire four people every year per role. If they could extend that tenure to even six months, they’d only need to recruit half as many people. So, rather than looking at how to better recruit and spending more and more money there, they should instead be looking at how to better retain. Which of their employees are with them for the longest period of time? Ask those employees what causes them to get out of bed and come to work, day after day, to a job that is almost identical to many others. Use that feedback to then find employees with similar traits. 

Spell out the traits of your successful employees in your recruitment ads. If flexible work schedules — where the employee and not the employer control the flexibility — are important to your longest-tenured employees, then emphasize that in your recruitment ads, your interviews, and your onboarding. Drill that in. If ability to advance is important, emphasize that in your ads, interviews, and onboarding.

Posted December 10, 2019 by

What’s a common resume tip that is actually really bad advice?

One of the most common and most harmful recommendations is to send a video or otherwise graphically enhanced resume to any medium- or large-sized employer that does not explicitly ask for one.

Why? Because the vast majority of them use applicant tracking systems (ATS), and almost none of these are able to handle video or graphics. Candidates who rely upon video or graphics to communicate their qualifications or career interests put themselves at a significant disadvantage when applying to jobs advertised by these employers.

Posted December 03, 2019 by

2 ways to stand out after a job interview

There are many ways for an applicant to stand out after being interviewed for a job. Here are just two.

First, bring with you to the interview some pre-stamped envelopes with thank you note cards. Immediately after you’re interviewed and have left the building, handwrite a quick thank you note to each person who interviewed you with a reference in each note to something that they said so they’ll know that your note was customized. Get those into the local mail that same day. The interviewers will likely receive the note the next business day, which will really impress them.

Second, once every week or two, email the interviews a note to confirm your continuing interest and provide them with a link or attach a scan of an article etc. that you’ve seen that may be of interest to them, such as something interesting that the press wrote about their company or one of their vendors or customers. You’d be surprised how many recruiters and hiring managers will assume that silence from a candidate indicates lack of interest.

Posted February 22, 2019 by

2 tips for how to stand out by following up after your job interview

Congratulations. You found a job of interest to you, applied, were granted an interview, and were interviewed. You’ve got a ways to go before you get hired, but how do you increase your chances of advancing from your first interview to the second and even further rounds?

Following up with the recruiters and hiring managers who interviewed you is key. You want to be sure that they know that you remain interested, not just as you’re walking out the door but in the days, weeks, and maybe even months to come. But be sure that you follow-up and don’t cross the line to be perceived as been a stalker. Some contact is good. Daily contact is bad.

A couple of tangible tips:

  • Bring with you to the interview some pre-stamped envelopes with thank you note cards. Immediately after you’re interviewed and have left the building, handwrite a quick thank you note to each person who interviewed you with a reference in each note to something that they said so they’ll know that your note was customized. Get those into the local mail that same day. The interviewers will likely receive the note the next business day, which will really impress them.
  • Once every week or two, email the interviews a note to confirm your continuing interest and provide them with a link or attach a scan of an article etc. that you’ve seen that may be of interest to them, such as something interesting that the press wrote about their company or one of their vendors or customers. You’d be surprised how many recruiters and hiring managers will assume that silence from a candidate indicates lack of interest.
Posted February 09, 2019 by

Selecting and Qualifying the Right Job Board Partners

“It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” – Napolean Hill

Mission Possible

Many companies craft mission statements that help guide the way they do business and create a certain company culture. Unfortunately, surveys show that these statements have very little influence on how many companies actually do business.

According to Wikipedia, a mission statement is intended to “guide the actions of the organization, spell out its overall goal, provide a path and the framework or context within which the company’s strategies are formulated.” That sounds noble – and even essential – for a successful company, and yet, in the daily hustle to meet customer needs, hit business targets and respond to competitive threats, these “guiding principles” are often the first things to slip. So, we understand why many people are skeptical about their value.

However, research also shows that the most successful companies are those that have teams focused around a common purpose and have deeply socialized guiding principles. They accomplish this by putting them into practice every day instead of letting them gather dust in a binder or simply serve as wall decorations.

What’s more, the most outstanding companies have “outward facing” principles, which means they have guidelines not just for creating a positive corporate culture, but also for how they interact with their customers. When deciding on a supplier or vendor, for any aspect of your business, including job boards and other recruitment vendors, it’s important to understand what motivates them and guides their actions.

Partnerships vs. Suppliers

For the most part, the “supplier-customer” relationship is straightforward. The supplier provides the product or service that the customer needs. And, the customer chooses a supplier based on price, features, quality, service levels, etc. But what if we take this relationship to the next level?

For instance, instead of viewing a recruitment services vendor as simply a supplier of candidates, begin to think of them as your partner – someone who is striving to help your business succeed by providing the right candidates for the right positions. In order to do this effectively, the vendor needs to know more than just the job description. They must understand the company/industry, the culture, the challenges, the “real” requirements, and more. This necessitates a partnership.

The difference between a supplier and a true partner is that partnerships are built through:

  • Transparency, candor, and empathy – There is trust, which is built on open, honest communications and a desire to understand your business and its needs.
  • Collaboration – Which requires active listening in order to discover how to bring more value to the relationship and tailor services to meet client needs.
  • Accountability – Partners want to exceed expectations, provide measurable results and offer performance guarantees.

Creating Value for our Partners

Let’s face it, one-way relationships are not very fulfilling. At College Recruiter, we believe that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And, we believe that a strong partnership with our customers must be two-way – with each party holding the other accountable for upholding their side of the “bargain” We understand that establishing mutually beneficial relationships with our partners – whether they are employers, advertising agencies, recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) organizations or universities – is critical to our success and yours.

“We think you’ll find working with College Recruiter to be like a breath of fresh air,” said Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer. “We believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience, and we’re passionate about the customer experience. We want to be more than just a ‘supplier’ – we sincerely want to form a lasting partnership with those we work with.”

At College Recruiter, we value:

  • Honesty and integrity
  • Enthusiasm, tenacity, and fun
  • Unparalleled customer experiences
  • Critical thinking and problem solving
  • Teamwork and collaboration
  • Continuous improvements

Doesn’t that sound like a company you’d like to partner with? Of course, actions speak louder than words. That’s why we stand behind our job postings, targeted emails, mobile banners, and display banner ads, and guarantee results for clients. From our management team and advisory board to our content panel and our employees, we select people who share our values. And, whether its targeted emails or job postings, branding campaigns or diversity solutions, College Recruiter delivers for our partners.

In fact, we have a long list of client partners that love us! Listen to what they have to say:

“We run job posting ads on a lot of sites but had never used College Recruiter until we purchased an unlimited job posting package a month ago. We were amazed at the high quantity and quality of responses that we received. After only two days, we had a positive return on our investment for the entire month.” –Leapforce, Inc.

“The support that you provide is outstanding. Thanks!” — Recruitment Center, Central Intelligence Agency

“We’ve tried several ways to recruit college students for our entry-level positions including job postings on other leading college job boards. None worked well so we were skeptical when first approached by College Recruiter… (Your) approach in having the job posted to our area rather than to a handful of schools proved to generate far more responses than the postings on the other sites…it really works!!!!” — Sequoia Financial

“College Recruiter has been working as a great resource for our Talent Acquisition team! Our inbox has been flooded with applications from quality candidates, a bit overwhelming but we will take it!” — University Relations and Recruiting Coordinator, HGST, a Western Digital Company

“I was completely blown away by College Recruiter’s data and analytics.” — Kara Yarnot, member of College Recruiter’s board of advisors and former head of talent acquisition for SAIC and college relations for Boeing

Making a Match

At the risk of sounding cliché, finding the right job board partner can be a bit like dating. You have basic requirements, but since a great recruiter needs to know your company or agency quite intimately, there are other aspects to consider when forming a partnership, such as:

  • Is there chemistry?
  • Do their values align with yours?
  • Are they well-managed and ethical?
  • Do they listen more than they talk? (No one likes a date who talks about himself/herself all night!)
  • Are they responsive?
  • Do they offer any type of guarantees?
  • Are they willing to offer references or direct contact with other customers?

Whether you work with College Recruiter or another job board, be sure to find the right fit for you. This will not only lead to a higher quantity and quality of applicants but also savings in both time and money over the long-term.

If you’d like to connect and talk about partnerships opportunities, visit http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/home or call 952-848-2211.

 

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

Posted February 07, 2019 by

AI, Algorithms, and Who Owns the Outcome

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our closing keynote was delivered by John Sumser, Principal Analyst for HRExaminer, an independent analyst firm covering HR technology and the intersection of people, tech, and work.

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Posted November 07, 2018 by

How do I find a great, paid internship?

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. And a great stepping stone to a great career is often a great internship. But students are often frustrated by how to find an internship and, when they do find one of interest, how to apply, get interviewed, and get hired.

If you try to do everything all at once, it can be overwhelming. I like to break the process down into manageable, bite-sized pieces.

  1. Don’t procrastinate. To use another cliche, early bird gets the worm. While I trust that you’d rather land a great internship than a great worm, the cliche is too well known and understood for me to pass up. Some internships, particularly those with non-profits and governmental agencies, have strict and sometimes very early deadlines. Looking for next summer? You might need to apply in November. As of the writing of this blog article on November 5, 2018, College Recruiter already had 1,795 internships advertised on its site and it is still a couple of months from January when employers start to get aggressive with advertising their internship opportunities.
  2. Complete your CIV analysis. What’s a CIV, you ask? Competencies, interests, and values. Grab a piece of paper and draw two lines down it to divide the paper into three columns. Write competencies at the top of the first column, interests at the top of the second, and values at the top of the third. Now, under competencies, write down everything that other people would say you’re good at. In the second column, write down everything that you find to be interesting, In the third column, write down everything that you care about. Now look for themes. What are you good at that also interests you and which you care about? Those themes are where you should focus your career search.
  3. Network. Many and probably most people think that networking is all about asking other for help. Wrong. It is about asking them how you can help them. That will build good karma and inevitably you’ll find that some — not all — will reciprocate by asking how they can help you. Take them up on the offer. Tell them about your CIV, where you want your career to start, and ask them for the names of two people you should talk with. Keep repeating that. After a few rounds of people referring you to people who refer you to people, you’ll likely run across someone who will decline to give you the two names, not because they’re a jerk but because they want to hire you. Bingo.
  4. Job search sites. Almost every college career service office has a career website, but the vast majority of jobs which are of interest to students and recent graduates are never posted to those sites. Why? Most employers don’t know about them and they can be hard and time consuming to use. So, use those sites but don’t stop there. Also use job search sites like College Recruiter, which typically has about a million part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs advertised on its site. Did I tell you that College Recruiter already has 1,795 internships advertised on its site? Oh, yeah, I did. Did you search them yet?
  5. Attend career fairs. Quite frankly, I’m not a huge fan because the expectations of the employers are often poorly aligned with those of the students. Employer representatives typically attend career fairs because they’re coerced by their bosses, their career service office partners, or both. Their disinterest shows, and they make it worse by refusing to accept paper resumes and telling you to go to their career sites if you want to apply. You could have done that from home, right? But they’re great places to network (see #3) and learn what it is really like to work for a company if you happen to run across a representative who likes to talk and maybe isn’t as discrete as they should be.
  6. Search and apply to jobs. Seems kind of obvious, right? But you’d be amazed at how many candidates don’t apply to enough jobs, apply to the wrong ones, or do a terrible job of applying the ones they are qualified for. If you’re an elite student at an elite school or otherwise have some exceptional qualities, aim high by applying to the most sought-after internships, such as 20 top internships listed below. For everyone else, and that’s almost everyone, the hard truth is that you’re just going to have to try harder. But, if it helps, remember the joke about what you call a doctor who graduates at the bottom of their class from a third-rate medical school. The answer is doctor. Most employers for most jobs feel the same way about interns and new grads. They care far more that you went to college than your major. They care far more about your major than your school. And they care far more about your school than your grades or whether you had a sexy internship or just successfully completed an internship, preferably for them.
  7. Create a job. Whether it’s a gig employment opportunity driving folks around or doing their grocery shopping for them or starting a small business in college like I did, don’t discount this option. But if you find yourself uttering, “I just need a good idea”, move on. The good idea is the least of your problems. Executing that good idea is FAR harder and FAR less exciting.
  8. Get experience. The entire point of an internship program for the employer is to convert those interns into permanent hires upon graduation. If they don’t, their internship program is a failure. Similarly, the entire point of interning is to get an offer to become a permanent employee upon graduation and then to accept that offer. If you don’t, your internship was a failure. Well, maybe not a complete failure, but not as much of a success as it should have been.

So, back to the top internship programs. What are they? I thought you’d never ask:

1. Google
2. Apple
3. Microsoft
4. Tesla
5. Facebook
6. Goldman Sachs
7. Amazon
8. J.P. Morgan
9. SpaceX
10. The Walt Disney Company
11. Nike
12. Morgan Stanley
13. IBM
14. Deloitte
15. Berkshire Hathaway
16. Intel
17. ESPN
18. Mercedes-Benz
19. The Boston Consulting Group
20. Spotify

— Source: Vault

 

 

Posted November 05, 2018 by

From internship to full-fledged career: how one Fortune 500 company is recruiting from within

 

Author: Kate-Madonna Hindes

Investing in entry-level workers creates greater job stability and more opportunities for advancement for employees, contributing to a more economically vibrant society.(Rockefeller Foundation)

Every single day, new relationships are forming, and interns are turning into full-time employees. Across thousands of different companies, H.R. and recruiting departments are making long-term investments for maximum growth and profitability. Smart companies are taking note while searching for interns to see if they have the qualities they are looking for in full-time employees.

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