• Not sure what to major in? See if your passion fits these in-demand degrees.

    August 16, 2017 by

     

    If you haven’t selected a major yet, you are probably getting all kinds of advice from peers, parents, faculty and everyone with an opinion on social media. Many advise that you study what you’re interested in. To follow your heart, because that way you’ll find a job you’re passionate about.

    Considering a major that will actually be in demand

    I agree wholeheartedly that you should study what you care about. But shouldn’t you at least know what degrees are actually in demand, so you can make an informed decision?  Continue Reading

  • Take a vacation to deal with burnout

    July 26, 2017 by

     

    Burnout is more than a catchy word. If you haven’t been in the workforce long, let’s hope you haven’t actually experienced burnout. There are real symptoms to watch out for, and if any of these sound familiar, you are due to take a vacation. Expert career coach Joanne Meehl of Joanne Meehl Career Services advises her clients to watch for “a severe imbalance.” The symptoms of burnout that she has seen are “frustration out of proportion to the problem at hand, a drying up of creativity and increasing reliance on ‘the way it’s been done here before’, increasing isolation or rejection of the team, and micromanaging for control.”

    Sound familiar? Time to take a vacation, and we’ll get to that. If not, we recommend you preempt the burnout and make sure your work doesn’t take over your life.  Continue Reading

  • [video] Effective negotiation skills: Discussing salary and benefits Part 2

    July 19, 2017 by

     

    Learning effective negotiation skills is not difficult, but you have to know what to ask for and when to ask. College Recruiter spoke with Marky Stein, a well recognized expert in career counseling, who gives her advice here for entry level job seekers about negotiating salary and benefits. 

    Stein is a member of College Recruiter’s  Panel of Experts, who consults Fortune 500 companies, presents at colleges and universities about career development, and is a bestselling author of career planning books.  This is Part 2 of 2 of our conversation with Stein. Here she addresses the gender pay gap and advises when to ask for a pay raise. In part 1 of our conversation, Stein provided tips for what to expect, how to prepare for negotiating and ideas for what to negotiate Continue Reading

  • College Recruiter is a featured presenter in the Grad CareerFestival designed to help unemployed grads land jobs quicker

    July 10, 2017 by

     

    Minneapolis, MN (July 10, 2017)–Grad Career/Festival is scheduled for July 27th– July 29th from 11 am – 10 pm daily (EDT). This event seeks to help college grads land a job 2.4 months more quickly! 33 hours of career advice!

    It takes over 7 months for average grad to find employment

    With nearly two million students graduating from college in May and June, it’s not surprising that it will take the average graduate 7.4 months to find employment.   While some of that time is a result of the economy not being able to absorb so many graduates at one time, much of it is a result of the fact that unemployed graduates simply do not simply how to look for a job.

    According to Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “Research by the National Association of Colleges and Employers has shown nearly 62 percent of graduating seniors either NEVER go to the career center, or will only visit once or twice.  It’s no wonder then that the average grad thinks the proper way to look for a job is to load their resume onto 100 websites and wait for someone to contact them!   We know, given the right knowledge and skills we can help an unemployed graduate find a job quicker.”

    Each author is offering three tips based on their niche area of expertise.  Graduates will learn relevant, contemporary strategies to create an elevator pitch, build their online brand, use social media to land a job, as well as learn traditional networking, resume, interviewing, and job search techniques.  Authors will share the importance of creating a career plan, managing their career, and staying current on job search strategies.   The authors will follow the TED Talk recommended presentation length which will provide graduates additional time to pose questions to authors.

    Event gives grads tools to improve resumes and skills in interviewing, networking and job search

    During each author’s presentation, time has been set aside to introduce graduates to innovative online career tools designed to improve their resumes, as well as their interviewing, networking and job search skills.  According to Rothberg, “Our firm and staff are concerned that college graduates are not receiving the knowledge and skills they will need for the dozen job searches they are expected to have by the time they turn 38 years old.   We are excited about the possibilities of putting thousands of dollars in the pockets of graduates by giving them simple insights on how they can not only find a job quicker, but help them launch and lead successful careers!”

    The cost to participate is only $33, but free to anyone who uses the authors promotion code of — CT –. Participation is limited!

    About Grad CareerFestival

    The Grad CareerFestival is produced by TalentMarks, a nationally recognized firm that provides scalable career and professional development programming to career centers, and alumni associations.   http://www.gradcareerfestival.com

    About College Recruiter

    College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Each year, we help almost three million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities find seasonal, part-time, internship, and other entry-level jobs. College Recruiter is free to candidates as employers pay to advertise their job openings with us. At any given time, we have about 300,000 job postings and well over 40,000 pages of articles, blogs, videos, and other career-related content.  

    For details and interviews, contact [email protected]   800-849-1762 x 205

  • [video] How to negotiate offers: tips for discussing salary and benefits Part 1

    July 07, 2017 by

     

    Negotiating offers by discussing salary and benefits can be intimidating for an entry level job seeker. If you haven’t done your research, you won’t know what to ask for. When you are given a job offer, that is the moment when you have the most leverage to negotiate, so make sure you are prepared so you don’t miss the opportunity.

    College Recruiter spoke with Marky Stein, who consults Fortune 500 companies, presents at colleges and universities about career development, and is a bestselling author of career planning books. This is Part 1 of 2 of our conversation with Marky to hear her advice for entry level job seekers about negotiating salary and benefits. Here she provides tips for what to expect, how to prepare for negotiating and ideas for what to negotiate. Part 2 will continue the conversation and will address the gender pay gap and when to ask for a pay raise. Continue Reading

  • [Video and infographic] Preparing for an engineering interview: Insight from Intel for female students and grads

    July 06, 2017 by

     

    How are you supposed to know how to stand out from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice regarding preparing for an interview, specifically for female engineer students who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 2 of 2 of our conversation. Last time we checked in with Jeff, he shared tips for engineering students who are preparing their resume.

    Jeff is a member of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is a group of professional around the country that regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers. Continue Reading

  • How entry-level assistant jobs can lead to long-term career success

    June 15, 2017 by

     

    Recent college grads seeking the opportunity to develop a wide variety of job related skills can do so by pursuing entry-level assistant jobs.

    That’s what Amanda Ponzar did in her first job as an administrative assistant.

    “It taught me business skills, computer skills, organization, project management, and how to work with others,” said Ponzar, who is now the Chief Marketing Officer of Community Health Charities, an Alexandria, VA-based non-profit federation that raises awareness and funds through workplace campaigns and strategic partnerships.

    From that job, Ponzar moved to a marketing assistant role with the Franklin Mint, a worldwide provider of fine art and collectibles.

    “I learned about marketing and advertising, and demonstrated curiosity, competence, dependability, and initiative, so I was soon asked to edit management letters and collateral marketing materials, and then was recommended by my colleagues for a copywriter job at The Franklin Mint’s in-house ad agency,” said Ponzar.

    That is when Ponzar’s career took off. She moved into advertising copywriter and marketing management roles, went back to school to earn a Master’s Degree in advertising and marketing, and is now a CMO of a non-profit.

    She credits her varied experiences as an assistant for her career growth and success.

    “I wouldn’t be where I am today without those first entry-level jobs as an assistant that helped me define my career path,” said Ponzar.

    College students, and recent college grads should consider assistant jobs as a way to get their foot in a door at a company they would like to work with, or to build important job skills. While most college grads don’t get a degree aspiring to be an assistant, think long-term. Assistant jobs help provide a paycheck to start paying off school loans or debt (and help achieve financial independence to not live at home), and/or provide real world experience and a chance to build important job skills. In addition, it’s a great opportunity for the recent college grad considering grad school to gain work experience before taking the next step of their career. Many assistants could also work with companies as they pursue advanced educational opportunities – and maybe the employer will also help pay for it through tuition reimbursement programs. Building a variety of marketable skills is important, and assistant jobs provide a great opportunity to do just that.

    Assistants have unique opportunities to be exposed to all facets of a business, says Brandi Britton, District President of OfficeTeam, a leader in the placement of highly skilled office and administrative professionals into administrative assistant and front office jobs. Assistant jobs are in demand at small and large companies, non-profits, startups, Fortune 500 and Silicon Valley firms. Companies like Google, Facebook, and other leading tech firms all succeed because of good assistants.

    “Entry-level assistant can learn valuable technology skills from constant exposure to Microsoft Office, enterprise resource planning, database management and customer relationship management software,” says Britton. “You may even build experience with social media tools since administrative staff are often tasked with monitoring and managing their company’s accounts.”

    Recent college grads seeking assistant jobs, whether it be an administrative assistant, marketing assistant, office assistant, personal assistant or executive assistant (which often do take more advanced skills), can also learn these important career skills, says Britton:

    • Time and project management: Assistants often have to keep on top of executives’ schedules as well as project timelines. Let’s not forget that assignments come their way from every direction. That’s why assistants are masters of time and project management, organization, multitasking and adaptability.
    • Continual learning opportunities: You become well-rounded because you’re able to work on a variety of tasks – everything from event coordination to presentation decks. Once you figure out the types of projects you like most, you can hone your skills and consider moving on to a more specialized role in the organization.
    • Budget and negotiation: When you frequently speak with vendors and make purchases on behalf of the company, you quickly become skilled at budgeting and negotiation.
    • Verbal and written communication skills: Assistants are in constant contact with any number of internal and external contacts. If you’re in the role long enough, you’ll develop strong verbal and written communication skills.
    • Specialized skills based on organization/industry: Being an assistant in a specific department or industry exposes you to the day-to-day operations and provides insight into that area’s lingo, processes and technology.
    • Inside company knowledge: You gain knowledge into colleagues’ work styles and the corporate culture, which gives you an advantage at the company if you hope to advance there.

    Alissa Carpenter founded Everything’s Not Ok and That’s OK Coaching after over a decade in higher education. She has advised Millennials and GenZ students at institutions such as The Wharton School and Penn State.

    “As a recent graduate, being a personal assistant can be beneficial to your long term career goals,” says Carpenter. “You have the unique opportunity to work on numerous tasks and learn transferrable skills. You are often on the front line and are able to build relationships and rapport that can provide valuable connections.”

    The three skills organizations believe millennials are lacking can be developed in a personal assistant role, says Carpenter, including:

    • Interpersonal skills: You will be working with people from various levels both in and outside of your organization. You will learn to ask appropriate questions to find the most effective way to complete your tasks at hand and build strategic working relationships.
    • Teamwork: In one of the key positions that is crucial to putting events and tasks together, you will learn how to delegate and how to work with people with varying personalities.
    • Communication skills: As a key point of contact you will quickly learn the most effective ways to communicate with individuals and how people like to receive communications.

    Utilizing a role as an assistant to get where you want to be later in one’s career can really be a asset to entry-level jobs seekers, says Lori Williams, Recruiting Coordinator for College Nannies, Sitters, and Tutors of Edmond, Oklahoma.

    “Not only does it help build credibility and experience on your resume, but the people you often meet in that role can be sourced as references in the future,” says Williams. “You can develop many skills in this role, including project management, event planning, client relations, and administrative duties. All of these skills are transferable into future roles in just about any industry. Being able to develop these skills on the ground floor will help you add a good section to your resume entitled skills or career highlights and you can translate these into the job description for future career goals.”

    Said Ponzar: “Never underestimate an assistant job as a way to get your foot in the door and show what you can do, learn about the company, develop relationships, and new skills.”

    Look for assistant jobs right now on College Recruiter! Want more tips and advice on how to build career and job skills? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Writing an engineering resume: Tips from Intel for female students and grads [video]

    June 08, 2017 by

     

    How are you supposed to stand apart from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice for preparing an engineering resume, specifically for female students and grads who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 1 of our conversation. Next time we check in, Jeff will share tips for preparing for an engineering interview.

    Scroll down to watch the video of our discussion and hear Jeff’s insight into what he looks for when recruiting engineers.

    Jeff is a member of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is a group of professional around the country that regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers.

    Find what is special about your story

    Before you do anything else, Jeff stresses the importance of the top half of your resume’s first page. That’s the first place you’ll get noticed. You need to include something that will impress the reader, like a statement that makes them want to find out more about your story. Have a good objective to show focus and to show your goals. It’s also good to have a summary of skills, says Jeff. As a student or recent grad, he recommends putting your education right up front so he knows whether you’re looking for an internship or a full-time position.

    The key is to think about what makes you special. Maybe you have some internship experience in the field. For others, it might be that you’ve taken relevant course work. Perhaps you’ve been a project leader several times, or your GPA is outstanding. Whatever your best strength is, says Jeff, should be right up front.

    Don’t compare yourself with candidates with 10 years of experience, because you’re not competing with them. Employers like Intel, says Jeff, know that you are relatively inexperienced, but everyone has strengths. “So I always tell students not to apologize for experience or things they haven’t done yet. Be proud of what you’ve done. You’ve taken coursework. If you’ve taken engineering that’s cutting edge for the level you’re at, be proud of that. Promote what you’re good at. Promote your strengths.”

    Red flags that will put you in the reject pile

    If your resume has typos, that looks really bad. But more commonly, Jeff sees a lack of specifics. For example, a generic and un-compelling objective would be: “looking for challenging opportunity where I can grow my career.” Jeff says that tells him nothing about where you could fit and grow at Intel.

    Further, he often sees resumes with positions or experience listed like a laundry list, with no indication of the quality of that candidate’s work. “It would be like if Michael Phelps said he’s a swimmer.” You need to speak about the quality of work you have done.

    So the key? Be specific, and use numbers when you can.

    What to put on your engineering resume besides work experience

    At this point in an entry level job seeker’s career, everything counts. Jeff says “you can put community or volunteer work. You can put team projects that you’ve done. Certainly the relevant coursework that you’ve done. Awards. Anything that helps you enhance your skills.”

    Specifically for engineering candidates, Jeff likes to see that you’ve given some thought to where you want to go. “So for example, if you’re a computer engineer, are you more interested in hardware or software?” Are you good at coding? Testing? Validation? “Narrow it down, and that tells me what relevant positions and what managers to connect you with.”

    A narrow focus doesn’t imply that you have to know everything before your first day on the job. “Any employer is going to train you in some areas,” says Jeff.

    Overall, your resume should tell a story of what you have achieved and accomplished. However you have succeeded—as a team leader, in your grades, community work, any skills you’ve taught yourself—belongs on your resume.

    How to get past the machines that scan resumes

    For engineering recruiters, the key words that they (or their systems) look for are all technical. Jeff says that at Intel, they don’t program their system to look for resumes with words like “aggressive”, which might end up preferring male candidates. Instead, Jeff says his systems scan for skills like C++ or architecture, or grad degrees.

    Many employers are starting to gain awareness of possible biases that would deter females from even applying. For example, there are software tools that help organizations analyze their job descriptions and make them more likely to appeal to both women and men. Jeff makes more salient point, however:

    “Males are more likely to apply to jobs when they only meet 50+% of the requirements.”

    Women are more likely to apply only when they believe they meet nearly all requirements. Considering that employers like Intel truly want more gender diversity among their engineering teams, there is a lesson here for women. Apply for jobs that list more requirements than you think you meet, and make your case for why you deserve to be hired.

    To get “out of that black hole of a database,” says Jeff, the key is to use the right keywords. To find the right keywords, check the job description and use the language that the employers uses.

    Once a human being pulls your resume from the database, then they’re looking at the whole thing.  “The technical words will get you the attention of my computer. But what I like to see,” says Jeff, is “the whole person. So not just the technical side, but how they are going to fit within the culture.” Employers like Intel will likely appreciate people who can work with minimal supervision, who are self-starters, can take initiative and not just wait for things to be done. Make sure you explain on your resume (and in an interview) how you demonstrate those skills. Think of situations when you’ve stepped to get a job done.

    After you’ve been on the job search for a while, take stock of what’s working. Jeff’s advises, “If you’re sending out resumes and you’re not getting interviews, you want to keep changing the resume until it gives you those results.”

    Finally, remember not to rely entirely on your resume. A big key to finding a job is to always follow up after you apply. For example, search on LinkedIn to find some connections within the company. A real person who can refer you or at least put your resume in front of the hiring manager can make a big difference.

    Search for jobs and internships today! Stay informed of career advice by connecting with College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

    Watch our discussion with Intel’s Campus Relations Manager Jeff Dunn, who provides excellent advice for female engineering students and grads, and any entry level job seeker:

  • 7 free marketing strategies that can lead to job search success

    June 06, 2017 by

     

    Are you a recent college grad trying to figure out how to best market your skills and fit your job search into an already busy life? Are you concerned that it’s summer and you’re still trying to find a paid internship? Are you wondering how parents can appropriately – or inappropriately help your job search? Are you a female college grad who aspires to become a leader in your field?

    If so, then read on. Because we have tips and advice for all those questions – and more.

    1. Develop a focused job search

    Many recent college grads simply read job ads and send in resumes, without a plan. Francis says coming up with a job search plan, which includes a list of requirements one would like in a particular job/field, can help created a more focused job search, and target specific jobs or employers. Making a chart that outlines previous experience – part-time jobs, college coursework, clubs or organizations, project work, or previous internships, and jotting down successes from those experiences can help a job seeker realize the successes they have, and then, when they understand those successes, they can start perfecting how they discuss them with employers.

    That also builds confidence.

    Don’t think that part-time college job in retail or the restaurant industry, or other field, matters? Think again.

    “Check back in with previous managers and colleagues to brainstorm all the things you’ve done and skills you’ve developed that may allow you to feel more confident in your abilities,” says Francis.

    Once you have a clearer sense of your own experiences, what you desire in a job, company and what job titles to look for, now you can start your search. If you start before then, you’ll be wasting time.

    2. Ask your career development center for advice

    Meet with a career counselor at your college or university. Even if you have graduated, these professionals are here to assist with job search tips, connecting graduates to a mentor, interview prep, and more.

    “Different schools have resources that are specific to their students and their majors,” says Christine Francis, Career Counselor at Hamline University’s Career Development Center. For example, if you graduated in data science, “the counselor may be able to connect you to alum who studied data science who may be able to help brainstorm next steps and get you connected to companies of interest or great internship programs.”

    Francis offers these tips for recent grads seeking to find an industry specific internship:

    • Post on social media that you’re seeking a paid internship in data science. “The more specific you are in your request, the better your networks will be able to help you,” says Francis. The key is to be as specific as possible, no matter the industry/career one is pursuing.
    • Check job boards to search for internships and job like College Recruiter, recently named #1 job search site for students and recent grads.
    • Use LinkedIn to connect with your school’s LinkedIn alumni group, and see where students or current alums are interning, or currently working. If there is a connection at a target company, reach out to that person and connect.
    • Once connected, start to develop a relationship. Don’t make it all about your needs, and be willing to return any favors to help the new connection. Eventually though, the goal should be to meet with these connections to conduct informational interviews.

    3. Practice, practice, practice, to develop career confidence

    It’s easy for recent college grads to be timid in the job search. That’s only natural. In addition to writing a great resume, practice interviewing, conducting mock interviews (many college career centers also offer these services), informational interviews, or getting involved in networking events and industry associations can help a recent college grad develop confidence in the job search. Many people are timid or fearful because of the newness of being in the job search for the first time. Getting involved and becoming active can help recent college grads develop confidence over time. In addition to working with career development professionals, recent college grads could also consider working with a career coach.

    “Figuring out where your low confidence is coming from is essential in determining how to overcome this,” says Francis.

    4. Start building a professional network

    The first steps to marketing your skill often starts by understanding what employers want. Unfortunately, in some instances or fields, women need to figure out how to get past male-sounding job descriptions. In addition, many female college grads may be timid if they are not finding other females, or leaders, within their chosen field, to learn from. This is where networking, or finding organizations/opportunities to volunteer or participate in industry-related events can help make connections and open doors, while also building career confidence. For example, a new grad seeking a data science career may not know where to find a female data science mentor or leader.

    “There are plenty of women in leadership types of groups or roles for STEM occupations,” says Francis. “These groups are set up to give women support and to feel more confident in their roles.”

    Remember, good old fashioned networking is still very effective.  Inviting professionals in your network for coffee or a quick lunch is good for building relationships and getting others interested in working on your behalf to help you find your next position says

    “You can start small, with just a few people and ask them to consider introducing you to others you may connect with and send your resume or portfolio to,” said Melissa Greenwell, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of national retailer The Finish Line, Inc., and a certified executive coach who helps women understand how they can leverage natural strengths to become business leaders, discussed how female college grads can become future leaders. “You will be surprised at how quickly your professional network will grow,” said Greenwell. “It will also take time. People are busy, so be patient. And don’t let your new networks go stale after you’ve landed the job. You may very well be able to repay a favor and you never know when you may need to reach back out to them in the future.”

    In a previous College Recruiter article, 6 rules for women who want to become corporate leaders, Greenwell said some job seekers, especially those just starting their career, focus on job titles versus opportunity. Don’t sacrifice doing what one loves for the sake of a title. Instead focus on the work itself.

    “People who succeed in whatever they’re doing are people who have aspirations and goals, are willing to work hard and put forth extra effort, communicate clearly, consistently and often, and most importantly, work for the good of the enterprise and bring others along,” says Greenwell, also the author of Money On The Table: How to Increase Profits Through Gender-Balanced Leadership. “Women specifically are driven to work for a purpose and can capitalize on that special drive.”

    5. Ask for helpful parents, not helicopter parents

    Many college grads have parents who are ready to help their child with the job search. That’s great, if done correctly. The main thing to remember is, this is the real world now, and employers expect recent college grads to take initiative, and own their career/job search. Read this article to learn how helicopter parents hinder college grads in detail.

    “Believe it or not, recruiters and hiring managers are seeing a surprising influx of parental involvement in the job search, recruiting, and interviewing process,” says Brandi Britton, district president for OfficeTeam, the nation’s leading staffing service specializing in the temporary placement of highly skilled administrative and office support professionals. “As a staffing firm, we’ve heard our share of helicopter parent stories and experienced some unique situations with moms and dads ourselves.”

    The reasons for mom and dad getting involved are simple, says Britton: Recent college grads may not have as much job search experience and therefore turn to their parents for guidance.

    “The job search process can be extremely challenging and daunting,” says Britton. “Parental support and advice throughout the process can help you stay positive and on track.”

    But…

    “Although most parents mean well with their efforts, they need to know where to draw the line to avoid hurting their son or daughter’s chances of securing a job,” says Britton.

    6. Find a mentor to develop as a professional

    Anyone can learn from a mentor. However, there are students who can especially benefit by having a mentor help tap them into a network that might normally be just beyond reach. For example, some studies show that entry level women with a mentor show faster career growth than women without mentors. How can one find a mentor?

    “Think about past professors, staff at your school who have supported you, or maybe a new contact – someone you admire in your field,” says Francis. “Set up a meeting to ask for help and tips on how to market yourself.” And when you land that first job, ask if the organization’s has mentorship program.

    7. Try something different: Find a way to stand out in the job search

    Don’t be afraid to try something different in the job search. Employers like creativity, and those who take risks. And while this seems old fashioned, it’s inexpensive, and different. In addition to applying online for a job, mail your resume to the employer too. (Don’t skip the online part–following the directions of every job ad is important.)

    “I’m often asked if sending paper resumes is a thing of the past,” says Greenwell. “In general, it is. However, you never know when one will make it to someone’s desk and cause them to take notice. It’s a relatively low effort and low cost marketing strategy to implement, so my advice is to send them.”

    Once the resume is mailed in, take it even further.

    “The follow up is important, which I would recommend come in the form of a follow-up email,” says Greenwell. “That email shouldn’t necessarily ask for action to be taken, but rather an invitation to reach out to you if they would like to learn more about your qualifications. Personally, I believe phone calls are relatively ineffective, though leaving a voice mail message to thank someone for reading your resume can’t hurt. Again, the goal is to stay visible.”

    Another option to consider? Build your own web site. It’s a built in marketing tool.

    “Building your own website is another interesting marketing strategy,” says Greenwell. “There are many tools available to build your own in a cost-effective and simple manner. This is a good way to display your experiences and interests, and to bring your resume to life. Highlighting educational accomplishments, learning adventures and volunteer experiences is critical. Aside from email, phone and a link to your LinkedIn profile, other personal information should be omitted.

    It’s normal for recent college grads to fear the unexpected, or not know how to approach the job search soon after college. Follow these tips, and over time you will become confident, connected, and in time, hired!

    Want more career advice and job search tips? Then stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube

  • 8 resume writing tips for that second job search out of college

    May 30, 2017 by

    If you’re a recent college grad or entry-level job seeker searching for resume writing tips or how to write a resume for that second job out of college, read on.

    Because the resume format that was used for that first job out of college is going to vary greatly for that second job. It’s not about what you did in college anymore, it’s about what you did in that first job. More specifically – it’s about results, achievements, development, and growth. And directed specifically for each job.

    So what are some resume writing tips for that second job out of college on? Read on to learn more:

    1. Resume writing tips: A resume is not a career biography

    A resume isn’t a career biography. It’s a marketing tool that quickly shows the next employer your background matches their needs. So understand this: When it comes to updating your resume for that next step in your career, you don’t need to include everything on your resume, says Mike McGuiness, Executive Director of Jobipedia, a non-profit organization that provides career advice for entry-level workers from a network of US-based hiring professionals at America’s top employers. Jobipedia.org is a community service created by HR Policy Association and supported by its member companies through HR Policy Foundation.

    “Include the information and experiences related to the job you’re applying for,” says McGuiness. “Highlight the skills and experiences that are transferrable to the new role.”

    That means, those college extracurricular activities, social clubs, and college coursework that were so important to your resume template or resume format when graduating from college, either should be moved to the bottom of the resume in an additional information section, or removed all together. You don’t need a list of college classes anymore, and only include brief sentences or details about social clubs, or extracurricular activities, if included.

    “You will then free up some space on your resume to include your current job experience and key accomplishments which you spent the past months/years cultivating,” says Terra Eison, Food, Beverage, and Culinary Recruiter for Hilton Worldwide, a global hospitality company. “Recruiters are more interested in your work experience and how your skills align with the open position.”

    2. Write the resume to fit the job description

    Resume writing tips: Know this – a general, one-size fits all resume can work, but a resume that is targeted to each and every job works better. Create a targeted resume by reading each job description, and then using the language in the job description when writing your resume. Highlight achievements, skills, and technology that match the job description.

    “When applying for any position, at any level in your career, scan the job description and mimic frequently used keywords,” says McGuiness. “Most large employer utilize applicant tracking systems to help them sort hundreds, sometimes thousands of resumes to find the strongest candidates.”

    The resumes that are a match to that job description, get noticed.

    Related: Why your resume isn’t getting noticed – and how to fix it

    3. Resume writing tips: Open with a strong summary statement

    Take the guess work out of the recruiters hands and let them know what position you are interested in based on your skill sets, goals and passion, by creating a strong opening summary statement, says Eison. This isn’t a long-winded paragraph. This is short and to the point, like this:

    Seeking financial analyst role where 2+ years of experience at a Fortune 100 organization will add value.

    Bold key terms, results, and language in that summary, and throughout the resume.

    “Your resume will be skimmed at first, so make sure to bold your titles and other areas where you want to capture the hiring manager’s attention,” says McGuiness. “If they are intrigued, they’ll read more.”

    Said Eison: “If you don’t have a clear summary, recruiters may wrongly assume the role you are applying to or they may not be able to decide where your skills would be an asset for the organization and your resume may be placed in the no pile.”

    4. Move education underneath work experience

    Now that you have job experience, that’s more important to highlight then you actual degree, says Eison. Recruiters spend less than 30 seconds – some studies say six seconds – to review a resume, so it’s important to have your work experience front and center on a resume. They want to see where you worked, and more important, what you achieved. When they scan the rest of the resume, they will then look for education. But education, is no longer what will stand out, even if you went to a so-called prestigious university.

    5. Focus on results from that first job, not responsibilities

    Focus on your job responsibilities and be very detailed and include quantifiable achievements. Include any key projects and accomplishments that may be important for the role you are applying to.

    Whenever possible, include numbers and statistics, says McGuiness. These jump out to a recruiter and are a quick way to indicate your impact and value in previous positions. “Increased donations by 30% after implementing an annual silent auction” or “Managed a call center that received over 1,000 calls daily.”

    6. Highlight certifications, training programs, stretch assignments and ongoing career or professional development

    “It’s important for employers to know that you are invested in your career and are hungry to keep learning and developing,” says Eison.

    If you attended a key industry conference, completed a certification or training class (whether online or in-person), reference this. For example, if you work in digital marketing and became Google AdWords Certified, or if you were trained on Adobe Experience Manager, list that. Better yet, list that with a success story/project example using those skills/programs.

    In addition, recruiters are looking for candidates with great leadership skills. If you have taken on any additional responsibilities, projects or stretch assignments at your first job, you should include this on your resume.

    “Companies are looking for ambitious leaders who are eager to learn and grow with their organizations,” says Eison

    7. Highlight soft skills

    Listing soft skills is important when writing a resume, because if a company is going to hire you, they will often train you using their own, unique processes.

    “Those soft skills – like leadership, communication and team work – are harder to train, so companies want people that have those skills coming into the role,” says McGuiness.

    But don’t just say you’re a “strong communicator” on your resume. Instead, show how you’re a strong communicator: “Presented quarterly earnings to senior directors and relayed their recommendations back to the team.”

    8. Proofread proofread proofread

    “My biggest pet peeve is misspelled words and grammatical errors on resumes,” says Eison.

    But it’s difficult to catch your own resume writing mistakes, so have a career coach, trusted colleague, roommate, significant other, or family member proofread your resume. Let’s be clear though: Asking someone (other than a career coach or recruiter whom you may know) to review your resume in terms of resume format or resume layout, is asking for trouble. Your roommate may be a great salesperson, but that doesn’t mean they are skilled at critiquing resumes. Your mom or dad be able to catch grammatical errors, but unless they work in HR, hire, recruit, or manage employees, their specialty is not “critiquing resumes” so save that for the professionals. But proofreading, that’s important. And anyone who can assist reading/reviewing the resume can catch mistakes.

    When reviewing resumes, consider these five proofreading tips to help perfect your resume: Go to the last page of your resume and read it from the bottom to the top. Looking at it this way can give you another view and help provide clarity to each sentence and give one final proof for spelling, grammar, and/or formatting issues.

    “The attention to detail in formatting, spelling, and grammar may seem trivial, but it can certainly make a huge difference and this may help you land an interview and ultimately getting your next job,” says Eison.

    Use these resume writing tips to stand out, get noticed, and get an interview. Then in time, you’ll land that second job out of college, and continue to advance in your career.

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