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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Workplace Gossip: Where’s The Harm?

As you begin your career working in an entry level job you are likely to encounter the workplace gossip problem. Often called office politics, this little troublemaker has been the ruination of many promising careers. To avoid having your entry level job wind up on the chopping block due to workplace gossip, it is a good idea to understand how harmful it can be and why.
Workplace gossip is relaying information, true or not, person to person about a third person or even the company itself. Usually, this information is of a negative tone such as impending layoffs or terminations in the case of corporations or snippets of an individual’s personal life and derogative commentary on their job performance. As we stated before, this information may be truthful or it could be misconstrued observations or even outright lies. In any case, relaying such derogatory information is a dangerous proposition for those employed in entry level jobs.
The danger comes from the fact that you may be spreading a story that you firmly believe to be the truth, which in actuality is not true, or even worse, was intended as a confidential communication. The company is losing production because the employees are busy spreading the word about the latest gossip while the reputation of the third party is being tarnished by the story being told. It doesn’t take a lot of thinking to understand that eventually the story is going to get back to the individual who is being gossiped about or to the management of the company. When this happens, two things can start to happen.
First, the individual will get angry. They may quit the job over the humiliation of having a private matter disclosed in such a way or they may go looking for the source of the information whether it was true or false. If the story being spread is false, there are even laws to protect the individual and the source of the information can be subject to penalty. It is not unheard of for corporations to terminate entry level employees for being involved in such cases.
Secondly, the company can take action. If the gossip being spread is about the company or its private communications is false, you can bet the management will let a few heads roll. Companies don’t like it when their happy employees become disgruntled because some wise guy decided that the memo about a possible layoff next winter needed to be spread around as a plant closing in June. The wheel of blame gets shifted easily and anyone who relayed the message can be held accountable for it.
Final thought: If you want to keep your entry level job, keep your mind on your own business. Workplace gossip is destructive and costly to companies. By steering clear of office politics, you make yourself a more productive worker.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Why Trade Associations Make Sense

For those seeking to find entry level jobs in a particular trade, the going may be a bit difficult. More and more, entry level positions are being filled before their availability ever becomes public knowledge. The reason for this is the use of word of mouth advertising by companies offering entry level job opportunities. The way this works is the CEO of corporation A says to his management staff that they have an opening in department A and they in turn spread this message to their staff. Very often, a member of this staff has a friend, relative or even a casual acquaintance who has the necessary skills for this entry level job and they relay this information to that individual. By doing the hiring portion of business in this manner, companies save money on advertising for new employees, improve the morale of their current crew (after all, who doesn’t want to work with their friends?), and can hire new employees at a lower cost.
The trade association comes into play because powerful networking connections can be made at this level. By joining such an association, you are rubbing shoulders with individuals who work for some of the largest firms in their various trades, those same firms who are offering entry level jobs. When you join a trade association, take the time to communicate with the other members of your group and let them know you are looking for an entry level job in your field and you may quickly find that the spirit of brotherhood among these groups is overwhelming as entry level job opportunities start flooding in.
In addition to the entry level job hunting aspects of trade associations, there are other substantial benefits to membership. Often these associations provide special services for their membership at a discount, such as group life and health insurance rates or the opportunity to participate in educational events. Often trade memberships offer a magazine subscription filled with trade related news and information to keep you current with new information regarding your trade. All of these things join together to make finding entry level jobs much easier for the trade association member.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Why Recruiters Want To Hire You

College students are beginning to experience the call of the recruiter more and more often these days. Entry level jobs are being offered and negotiations being made every day for the entry level employment of current college students. With this being the case, you may be wondering just why recruiters are putting such an emphasis on hiring you as a future graduate.
To put it simply, recruiters make the best return on their company’s investment by hiring early. On average, it cost the recruiters corporation anywhere from three thousand to six thousand dollars to hire a new employee to fill an entry level job. Typically, it takes thirty days before this individual will decide to take the position. By starting the recruitment process earlier, the recruiter gets first access to the very best students in their field while their relative value in the workplace is still quite low due to lack of experience. Thus, a recruiter can be fairly confident that those who choose to accept the offer of an entry level job upon graduation will have up-to-date skill sets and the ability to perform their job functions at a much lower salary than seasoned professionals in their field. In other words, work experience is a valuable commodity and companies expect to pay a premium for it. Those with less experience but equivalent education can be hired for a lower price so early recruitment efforts are on the rise. When you consider, the average employee increases a companies annual revenue by $150,000 and, in some of the major corporate players, this figure can go as high as $300,000, it is a matter of simple mathematics to understand the potential for increased profits that is the bread and butter of the college recruiter.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Using The Past To Predict Your Future

While no one can guarantee what the future will bring, looking at past performance is often a very good way to predict what will happen with surprising accuracy. As humans, we have learned this lesson and applied it to many of our sciences and endeavors. To illustrate, if you want to invest a large sum of money in the stock market, most people will research a good number of stocks and select from these the ones that have shown a consistent pattern of earnings or that fit into the profile of a similar investment that was successful. By doing so, the majority of the individuals investments will return a profit rather than losing money.
You, the college student, are making a far more important investment. This investment will determine the course of your life and the degree of success you can attain. The time, money and energy that you are putting into your education can reap rich rewards or return catastrophic failure, depending upon how you handle the investment. By referring to historical data on labor statistics, you can determine what areas have consistently provided high paid entry level jobs and in what fields the entry level job market has suffered during business cycle fluctuations. By using this information, you can formulate an accurate idea of what the future corporate world will have to offer you upon graduation and adjust your curriculum accordingly. By taking the time to research the past, you can find high paid entry level jobs in your future.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Understanding What Unemployment Rates Mean To Your Job Search

As you set out to find an entry level job in your chosen field, you will likely hear people mention several terms that may be unfamiliar to you. Many of these things have an effect upon the area of the job market you are seeking to enter so understanding some of the more important ones can be very helpful to your entry level job search. One of the most important phrases you are likely to hear discussed is the unemployment rate. Though you may already understand what the unemployment rate is, knowing its effect on the entry level job market can make the process of finding entry level positions much easier.
The unemployment rate is an average arrived at by figuring out how many people are unemployed as compared to the total number of people in an area. To give an example, a report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics showed that the state of Michigan had the highest unemployment rate in March of 2008. The states unemployment rate at that time was 7.2% meaning that just over seven out of every one hundred people residing in the state during March of 2008 were unemployed.
Understanding what the unemployment rate means isn’t enough though. What this will do to the entry level job market is even more important. What can we deduce from unemployment rates from the perspective of an entry level job seeker? To continue with the example already cited, a 7.2% unemployment rate, would equate to stiff competition for available entry level employment opportunities. This competition would also lead to lowered salaries and less appealing incentive plans because the companies offering entry level jobs would have more applicants to choose from. To the inverse, a very low unemployment rate, such as the 2.5% rate of South Dakota in March of 2008, would indicate a growing economy with more entry level jobs than applicants. This lack of competition for jobs leads to higher wages and incentive plans designed to attract new recruits.
By understanding the principles which govern the entry level job market, you can use a knowledge of your areas economic situation to find the best opportunities for entry level jobs.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

The Statistics Of College Job Markets

Recently published statistics show some interesting facts for the entry level job seeker who is currently attending college. As graduation dates approach the majority of students will not have received offers of employment but seventy-four percent of all students are confident that they will have an entry level job within six months of their graduation… and their confidence is not without good reason.
Employers are seeking new graduates to fill entry level positions and doing so actively. It is reported that seventy-one percent of the employers who took the survey intended to offer entry level jobs to the new crop of college graduates and a full forty-one percent have already done so. This has resulted in an amazing twenty-two percent of graduating college students having a firm entry level job offer waiting for them upon graduation.
With these statistics, it is easy to see that college recruiters are becoming more competitive in their search for new talent and this bodes well for current college students. Why? Because it means that entry level job recruiters will have to work harder to secure the new employees they want from the graduating class. Job offers will have to include perks such as insurance, better salary structures, vacation time and other benefits to attract the attention of entry level job seekers who are being courted by other companies as well. These benefits are not a one sided proposition though. By offering such attractive entry level employment opportunities, recruiters are insuring loyalty to their companies thus increasing the amount of time that new hires will stay with their company and increase revenues.
The votes are in and the numbers show that the entry level job market for college students is booming. If you want to find your place in this market, the resources at collegerecruiter.com can help.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Negotiating Raises Made Easy

Nearly every college graduate will enter the workforce by way of an entry level job and, while this is a wonderful place to start, the pay scale for these jobs often leaves something to be desired. If you find that your entry level job is not meeting your financial responsibilities, then the time for negotiations is at hand.
To be honest, there are a lot of people currently employed in jobs that should be paying them a much higher wage but one main thing is preventing this… their failure to ask for it. If you honestly can say that you are doing a good job and bringing something to the company where you work, there is no harm in asking for a pay increase. Get over the fear and ask but, before you do that, do your homework.
There are multitudes of resources available for those working entry level jobs to discover just how much their particular job is worth. One of the best places to look is the Internet where one can find tools such as salary calculators, which can give you a fair estimation of your jobs value. Determining what you are worth before sitting down at the negotiation table can help you argue your case better and reduce the impulse to jump at just any offer your employer might make. Understand before you set out that you may not get an offer as high as the calculator says you could be getting but knowing what the job is worth will help you decide if the offer is enough to make you happy.
Finally, make yourself more valuable. Adding experience gained through internships or additional education can go a long way towards increasing your value in the eyes of your employer. An extra class or educational workshop from time to time keeps you current with industry standards and brings this knowledge back to your company’s resources. In companies with limited budgets or cross-trained personnel, a little extra education or experience can mean the difference between getting a raise and getting excused.
Negotiating for your raise doesn’t have to be hard. By following these simple tips, you can make negotiations for higher pay on your entry level job a simple procedure.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Improving Your Performance On The Job

One of the biggest complaints college graduates have about their first entry level job is the low rate of pay. If you are suffering from the same problem, improving your performance on the entry level job can make it much more profitable. Unfortunately, improving ones performance on the job is often easier said than done. Finding your own weaknesses can be a difficult task but for those willing to honestly critique their own performance, the benefits to their on the job performance can be astounding.
The first step to improved performance on the entry level job is being honest with yourself. Put yourself in the shoes of your employer and look for both positive and negative points in your performance. Ask yourself what is causing your problem areas and how you can change them. Look at the areas where you excel and figure out how to use success in these areas to bolster the weaker areas.
Secondly, have goals in place and a plan for reaching them. Both long term and short term goals are critical to the entry level employee seeking to improve their on the job performance. As you attain these goals, set new ones to work towards.
Finally, never stop learning. Your performance on the entry level job is greatly effected by the education you have. To illustrate, let’s pretend your job were to stack a set of blocks in alphabetical order. Stacking the blocks is simple and you can perform this function easily. There is only one hitch: You were never taught the alphabet. Without learning this information, where would you expect your performance level to be? Your skills will only take you so far if they are not backed by a solid education.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

How Much Education Do You Need?

Pink Floyd chanted the anthem for at least two generations of teens when he sang the lyrics, “We don’t need no education…” Little did his listeners realize that the seeming freedom from tyrannical instructors and educational systems that they were chanting about wasn’t really the nirvana that they were imagining. Luckily, most of these youth weren’t quite as revolutionary as they imagined themselves to be and went on attending class and even college. Had they truly turned their backs on their education, they might have found a world far more frightening than Pink Floyd’s depiction of the Machine or learned just what it was like to be a brick in the wall.
The reasoning behind this statement are sound. The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics has released a report that details the projection of availability for entry level jobs through the year 2014 and the educational requirements that will be required to obtain entry level jobs within these industries. Known as the Occupational projections and Training Data, or Bulletin 2602, this compilation of research was released in February of 2006. Dividing jobs into categories based on the level of education required, the projections indicate that the majority of available entry level jobs through the year 2014 will require at least some college education and those possessing degrees will have even greater chances of successfully finding entry level employment in their desired field of work.
What does this mean to the college student today? Basically, don’t lose hope. Even though attending classes and balancing the student lifestyle and budget can be difficult, the entry level employment opportunities of the future will require you to demonstrate the skills you are learning today.

Posted June 04, 2008 by

Following Up On Prospective Job Offers Via Telephone

Telephones have become a part of our daily lives. Many of us carry one on our belt or in a pocket. Nearly everyone has one or more phones in their home. Yet, even with their widespread usage, the telephone is often overlooked for some of its more valuable uses like following up interests when applying for entry level jobs.
Because our past experiences may have taught us that a plethora of phone messages can be a bit irritating, we try to make a good impression with employers offering entry level jobs by not calling to follow up on any interests they might have in our application. Unfortunately, not calling at all can be worse than calling too much. When you take the time to call, you are showing a self motivated attitude and an interest in the entry level job they have to offer. If you are polite and let the secretary know that you will call back again, the prospective employer won’t be irritated by a list of phone messages but will see just how much you want the entry level position you applied for.
Before you call, know what you want to say. Take the time to consider the phone call carefully and even rehearse the call before you call the prospective employer. This serves two purposes; you will be more relaxed and conversational on the live call and you can effectively reply to anything that you might be asked on the call.
As a final point, breathe once in a while. If you have ever attempted to hold a conversation with a teen-aged girl, you know just how annoying nonstop babble can be when there is no room for you to join in the conversation. It is just as annoying in the real world. By taking the time to pause and catch your breath, you open the door for the other half of the conversation to speak. You never know what valuable information you may learn by this method.
In conclusion, following up on entry level job prospects via telephone can be a very good way to insure your chances for employment in entry level job positions.