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Posted January 28, 2011 by

Entry Level Non-profit Jobs With Public Architecture

As much as I should have a great appreciation for architecture because my father is an architect, but I must admit that I’m still not quite there yet. However, as a guy who occasionally builds websites, I fully appreciate “the practical problems of human interaction in the built environment.” That’s why I think that San Francisco based Public Architecture is a pretty cool non-profit. Their logo is their mission statement, and if the font is too small for you to read (ummm can we say problems of human interaction?), then here’s what they do: they put “the resources of architecture in the service of the public interest.” How do they do that? Through a method, a model, and motivation.
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Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Entry Level Jobs With the Fatherhood Educational Institute

Posted on June 21, 2009
Father’s Day is almost always a little bittersweet for me, as it marks the end of a week long fly fishing trip with my Dad to Northern Michigan. I hate for the trip to be over, but there’s no better way to celebrate the holiday than having spent a week with my Dad doing what we love–catching fish. Last year I searched high and low to bring you a post about the National Fatherhood Initiative, and this year it wasn’t easy to find another Dad related non-profit. Lucky for you, I came across the Fatherhood Educational Institute, which is based in Chicago. I know that I couldn’t have done half the things that I’ve done in my life without my Dad (like start this business), so it makes a lot of sense that the Fatherhood Educational Institute aims “to promote positive fatherhood involvement in povery stricken communities.” Great fathers are so important to the success of their children.
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Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

4 Fool-proof Steps to Find Your Ideal Job on LinkedIn

Article provided by Brand-Yourself.com
With over 11 million users, LinkedIn is an ideal tool to create your online presence, build a professional network, and if done right, find a job.
According to a recent survey, 75% of job recruiters now use Linkedin to research prospects.
Translation: if you don’t have a LinkedIn account, you’ve already got one strike against you compared to applicants that do. If you aren’t already on LinkedIn or feel you aren’t fully taking advantage of it, here are a few tips to get started.

1. Create a compelling, differentiated profile
Your profile is NOT just your resume re-posted online. It should be an extension of your resume, a chance to say more than you otherwise could on a single sheet of paper.
On your LinkedIn profile:

  • Upload a professional head shot. Social networking is all about connecting with real people. Your photo adds a welcome touch of personality. And it goes without saying: keep the picture professional and G-rated.
  • Be personable, not just a robotic list of bullet points. Don’t merely rehash the qualifications and experience already on your resume. Include them, but use the summary section to add some color to your profile using your own voice. Note: do not try to be funny if there’s any chance a particular hiring manager doesn’t share your sense of humor – and that’s pretty much guaranteed.
  • Post a few powerful recommendations. Linkedin allows you to post endorsements from other people. A nod from a former boss, professor or colleague may be just the edge you need. Social proof makes it easier to trust you.
  • Incorporate free plug-ins to showcase your talent and personality. Applications like Slideshare and Google Presentation allow you to post projects and presentations that demonstrate your skills.
  • Link to your personal website or blog. This gives a more well-rounded view of you, and helps your other pages come up higher in search results.

2. Build your online network
Creating a profile is just the first step. Now you need to connect with people. Just like in real life, social networking is all about building meaningful, mutually-beneficial relationships with people in your industry. In the end, it’s not what you know OR who you know. It’s about who knows you.

  • Search people and groups for your school alumni, former bosses, peers, coworkers, etc. You know more people than you think. Use the search tool to find alumni and former colleagues and bosses. This is the easiest way to connect with a ton of people (if you do it right).
  • Ask for help and advice. Once you connect you can send them direct messages. DO NOT send out blanket messages asking for a job. Show them respect and do your homework. If you ask individuals specific, thoughtful questions they will be happy to help. Remember, they were once in your shoes too.

3. Add value to your community
Insightfully ask and answer questions on LinkedIn to stand out among other applicants. LinkedIn is not a one-way marketing tool. You need to add to the conversation:

  • Join relevant groups and discussions. This is the best way to meet people in your industry and establish yourself as a player. Use the search tool to search for groups by industry. Join the groups relevant to you and start networking.
  • Answer questions. Post interesting articles. Start discussions. Become an active, valuable member in the community. Remember, the group is not just about you. You can’t just log in and ask for a job. It’s all about career karma: give yourself to others, then reap the benefits when they get your foot in the door.

4. Find a job
After you create a strong profile and solid network, you may be surprised how many opportunities await you. Now you need to:

  • Let your network know you are looking. Once you establish yourself as contributing, thoughtful member of your community, people will be more apt to lend a hand in your job search. Be specific about what type of work you are looking for, the skills you bring to the table, and the location you are looking to work in.
  • Use the Job Search function and sort results by “degrees away from you”. Chances are you will be connected to the job poster through someone in your network. Trace your connection and ask for a introduction.

Follow these guidelines and you will be on the right path. Remember, social networks do not replace traditional networking or job search techniques. They do, however, greatly extend them. As always, patience is key.
Article by, Patrick Ambron and courtesy of Brand-Yourself.com for actionable tips to put you in a position of power in the job market

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Manage Online Reputation – Student branding: Jason Kirby

Article provided by Brand-Yourself.com
This is our second post in a series that will forever continue about students that brand themselves online and truly create a presence worthy of remark!
Meet Jason Kirby who created his own personal professional website. Why you might ask? “The reason behind creating a website about me is simple, I wanted you to find me online. People use Google to search anything and everything, especially companies looking to hire new potential workers.” That is GREAT!
He found me by commenting on my previous post with an intelligent and intriguing response that provoked me to search for him in Google and was so impressed with what I found that I had to share it with everyone. So lets break his online presence down and find out what we can learn from Jason.

This is directly from his “Who Am I?” tab.
“My name is Jason Ryan Kirby I reside in the beautiful city of San Diego, Ca. I am currently majoring in Entrepreneurial Management at San Diego State University. I am young, motivated, dedicated, self-disciplined and optimistic individual. I love life and everything it has to offer and wish I had more than 24 hours in a day to take advantage of my time here on Earth. I am a family man at heart and put family before everything because without family I am nothing.”
We now know where he is from and currently what he is studying from this short professional bio. The next few sentences describe his traits, personality and his strong beliefs which would impress any employer who stumbled upon it.
If an employer was to stumble upon it they would be able to view is resume as well without asking for it. He has taken the liberty to post his resume online so that anyone can view his past experiences. Web resumes are much more appealing than a paper resume as you have the ability to expand on your experiences rather then being confined to a single piece of paper. You can also see from his tabs on the right that he has a blog and even started his own company. Creating your own blog is a great way to gain visibility and credibility at the same time if you write meaningful and thought provoking content, which he has.
And the last thing that I would like to point out is the reach of his online presence. He has links to all the major social networking sites right on his website so that anyone can connect with him on multiple levels. While I am not friends with him on Facebook (yet!), I would assume that he has nothing incriminating on his site as he is a young professional who values his online presence and professional career. I did however immediately connect with him on LinkedIn WITH a personalized message telling him why I wanted to connect with him. Also I followed him on Twitter because he has a lot of relevant and informative tweets and he RT’s ours!
I feel a big part of personal branding is not only trying to advances ones own career but being humble enough to advocate others as well. So with that being said, I wish Mr. Kirby the best of luck with his endeavors and encourage everyone to do as he has. Please check out Jason’s personal professional website.
Please check out our other post on student branding:
What you can learn from a well branded student Meaghan Burns
Trace Cohen has always been fascinated with technology and how stuff works. Once he gets his hands on a new gadget, rest assured it will be taken apart and put back together in a matter of minutes. Trace is a hands-on kind of guy whose first love was video games, which he loves to this day.
Article courtesy of Brand-Yourself.com for actionable tips to put you in a position of power in the job market

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

10 Ways To Thrive By Thinking and Acting Like A Freelancer

In 2001 when Dan Pink published “Free Agent Nation,” it was seen as a trailblazing book on the modern workplace. A future workplace characterized by less job security, no more “jobs for life”‘ along with a distinct lack of long-term loyalty from employees towards organisations.
As Pink contended, in a globalised, interconnected world economy characterised with ever-increasing competition and technological advances, the workplace will never be the same again.
These forces have conspired to make those of us in the industrialised world “free agents.” That is, independent, freelance consultants – regardless of whether we’re in full-time employment or not.

I’ve been talking about this with clients for several years, but for many people this has been a difficult concept to comprehend. Especially for those in permanent roles with no intention of becoming self-employed.
But interestingly, as the events in the financial markets and job market over the last 18 months have shown, a permanent contract doesn’t mean much. And those individuals who will thrive in the modern workplace will be the ones who think and act like a professional, forward-thinking freelancer.
Here are 10 ways you can thrive by acting and thinking like a freelancer:
1. Focus on outputs, not inputs
Testimonials and referrals are the lifeblood of a freelance independent professional. You get those by being client-focused and delivering commercial outcomes, rather than just concentrating on inputs.
So get clear about the key outputs and results you deliver and become known for them. Be able to quantify them. And ensure your CV, resume and bio’s communicate them.
2. Build a distinct personal brand
Your personal brand is the consistent communication of the distinct value proposition you offer to current and future employers/clients.
To develop a strong personal brand, you need to:
A) Be clear about the results your deliver and the value you create
B) Be clear about what is different about you and the way you create those results
C) Develop a marketing strategy to articulate that value proposition consistently
Like any other brand (e.g. Nike, Starbucks or BMW) – the stronger your personal brand, the easier it is to differentiate yourself from others, build loyalty, attract new opportunities and command higher rates of pay/fees for your work.
3. Be visible and credible online
A key aspect of your personal brand is your online image. It’s customary to ‘Google’ people you’re about to headhunt, interview or meet in a business context for the first time.
So if I were to “Google” you, what would I find out about you? What would appear on the first page of the search? Will it be in line with the personal brand you’re trying to portray?
Every time you do anything online, you leave a “digital footprint” – so ensure that footprint shows you in a good light and is in tune with the personal brand you intentionally want to convey.
So at the very least, ensure you own the domain to your name and have a LinkedIn page that articulates your expertise. Ideally aim to have an online presence under your name (or brand name) where you can share ideas, opinions and expertise via a blog, articles and white papers. This positions you as an expert in your own right rather than just highlighting your employer’s credentials.
4. Build and cultivate a strong network
The time to build a well is when it’s raining, not during a drought. The time to build a strong network is today, tomorrow, next week. And the week after. You should be doing it all the time – not just when you’re looking for a job.
And remember: networking is not about “getting” something – it’s about contributing, helping others and sharing.
When you network with generosity whilst having a distinct personal brand, you attract opportunities and contacts on an ongoing basis and so avoid the typical “feast and famine” cycle endured by many freelancers.
5. Learn to embrace uncertainty
Part and parcel of being freelance is less certainty and predictability.
As a permanent employee, instead of fearing uncertainty, learn to embrace it by following these, the 8 rules of dealing with uncertainty that I’ve written about before. Follow these rules consistently and you’ll be able to not just survive, but thrive when the going gets tough.
6. Create multiple income streams
You can reduce the uncertainty by creating a number of streams of revenue rather than relying on one pay check.
Speaking, writing, consulting, investing, trading and building an online business are all examples of ways in which you can create opportunities, just like a freelancer would do.
But as we’re all now freelancers, we all have the potential to earn income from multiple sources.
7. Be totally committed
Some people think being a freelancer is all about money. About being loyal only to yourself and just making as much money as you can.
I don’t buy that nonsense.
Just because you haven’t got a permanent contract it doesn’t mean you’re not committed.
I’ve been a self-employed consultant for 6 years and, yes, have been committed to building my own personal brand and my own network – and I’ve invested a lot of time and money in the process.
But at the same time I’ve been totally loyal and committed to firms which I’ve been a freelance consultant to. So much so that people have frequently assumed that I was a permanent employee.
That’s because I don’t exclusively put my own interests above those of the client I’m working with.
So what if I’m not in a permanent role? I’m still a professional. And so are you. So make sure you show total commitment to whoever you are working with (employer, client or otherwise) – and the results, opportunities and job satisfaction will come naturally.
8. Focus on “responsibilty”‘ instead of blind loyalty
When I talk about thinking like a freelancer, building your own network and developing new income streams people become a little concerned as they see it as being somewhat disloyal and slightly dishonest to their employers.
The reality is that most firms are being a little disloyal and dishonest to you too – it’s part and parcel of running a commercial business, where the management team have a responsibilty to shareholders and the majority of employees, rather than to individuals.
You too have a responsibilty – to you and your family. So don’t be blindly loyal to one firm – be committed, but also ensure you have options so that you’re not left without an escape route if required.
9. Invest in yourself
You reap what you sow. If you want to stay ahead of the pack and thrive, you must continually invest in yourself, and not rely on your employers to do it for you.
That investment can be in the form of reading widely, attending conferences and seminars, joining network groups, hiring a coach, finding a mentor or building mastermind group of peers – do whatever suits your style, budget or needs.
10. Make YOU a priority
All of the 9 points above rely on you ensuring that you make yourself a priority.
“…but I haven’t got the time”
That’s BS – it’s all about priorities – we create time for what’s important. So think like a freelancer and make yourself a priority. Because in this new world, your employers won’t always be investing in you and providing you with the opportunities like the old days. It’s down to you to invest in yourself and make things happen.
It doesn’t matter whether you are unemployed, a contractor or a permanent employee – we are all now the CEO’s of our own companies – Me Inc. The faster you embrace that concept and incorporate many of the points above – the more you will thrive in the months and years ahead.
Article by, Sital Ruparelia and courtesy of CareerHub.com. The Career Hub blog connects job seekers with experts in career counseling, resume writing, personal branding and recruiting.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Using Social Media as a Career Management Tool

I just finished attending a very informative webinar on social media offered by SelfGrowth and presented by its founder, David Riklan. A simple definition of social media is that it is “massive information sharing and and communication on the Internet.” Social media tools are key to building your online presence and brand.
There are 5 main tools highlighted in the seminar that appear to be especially effective for business owners and individuals (particularly executives and professionals) looking to proactively manage their careers. These are Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, Blogging, and Twitter. According to Riklan, there are 112 million blogs on the Web, 200 million Facebook members, 13 billion views of YouTube per month, 36 million business people on LinkedIn, and 8 million users of Twitter (growing at an astounding 40% per month).

A quick and relatively easy way to start would be with LinkedIn, Blogging, and Twitter (which is really mini-blogging in 140 characters or less). Then, to maximize online exposure, incorporate Facebook, and if you are more adventurous, add YouTube to your personal branding strategy. Major corporations, small to mid-sized businesses, entrepreneurial start-ups, and individuals looking to position themselves as experts in their fields of expertise are all branding themselves effectively using some or all of these tools.
As part of your career management strategy, the key goal of maintaining an online presence through social media sites is to position yourself as an expert in your field. A prerequisite to doing this is to firstly determine how you are going to brand yourself, and then create a profile that matches your brand or message. Next you’ll create accounts at all the major places where you can brand yourself (for free), including establishing a blog (also free at places like Google’s Blogger.com). Then develop a social bookmarking strategy (on places like Digg, Delicious, StumbleUpon) both as a tool for driving traffic to your blog and your presence on these sites, and for keeping your knowledge up to date. To leverage SEO (search engine optimization) and drive traffic to your presence on each social media site, interlink among your pages or profiles on the various sites.
The next step is to develop a strategy for using video. This may be scary to you (it is to me), but for some it’s going to be a natural and the most effective tool of them all. I’ll explore this strategy further in another post, probably after I have taken the plunge myself. (I hope you’re not holding your breath.) 😉
In order to make all of this work, you must be active on all the sites and establish yourself as a voice for your industry. To increase visibility, participate in or start groups on the various sites. Monitor what’s going on in your industry (via the bookmarking strategy you implemented above) and continually add brief posts, comments, etc. on the sites regarding what you learned. Answer questions on Q&A forums. And remember the most important rule of networking and business/social interation: GIVE, GIVE, GIVE. To paraphrase the great Zig Ziglar: “You can have everything you want in life if you just help enough people get what THEY want.”
Article by, Laurie Smith and courtesy of CareerHub.com. The Career Hub blog connects job seekers with experts in career counseling, resume writing, personal branding and recruiting.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

The Changing Face of Careers and Work

Change happens constantly in the world of work, it seems ever more rapidly. Remember when the Internet and email began to surface in your job function or job search about 10-15 years ago. After that came social networking via Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. It seemed like we all needed to make quantum leaps in our thinking and actions to adjust.
Well, hang on to your laptops because the changes that are coming are going to require forethought in career planning and in job search management. Better to get some advance notice, is my motto. So, here is a list of 10 key new-world-of-work factors, along with some interesting stats, as described in the Time magazine article The Future of Work:

1. High Tech, High Touch, High Growth
According to McKinsey & Co. (mega-consulting firm), 85% of jobs created between 1998 and 2006 involved knowledge work, like problem-solving and strategizing. For the next 7 years, the US Department of Labor predicts that IT jobs will grow 24% – twice the normal job-growth rate.
2. Training Manager to Behave
Were business management schools the breeding ground for unethical management practices that led to the downfall of the economy? Or was it simply personal greed and bad debt on the part of a few? The debate rages on in this section of the article.
3. The Search for the Next Perk
Be prepared – companies are cutting benefits left and right. While companies’ healthcare spending rose 29% over the last 5 years, employees have seen their financial responsibility for healthcare increase 40% over that same period.
4. We’re Getting Off the Ladder
The bottom line for the company is saving money. So if telecommuting can cut payroll costs by 10% and real estate costs by 20% as some studies suggest, then companies may just sign on for this style of workplace management. Certainly reducing hours and unpaid furloughs are already the norm. Similarly, moving employees laterally to fill gaps in the workforce can improve many companies’ need for gazelle-like flexibility and responsiveness. The career ladder may become an antique!
5. Why Boomers Can’t Quit
Again, it is all about the money. The boomers retirement plans have hit a snag in the road with the economic downturn. T. Rowe Price predicts that the oldest of the boomers will have to work nearly 9 more years before they can retire.
6. Women Will Rule Business
Research think tank Catalyst found that of the 353 Fortune 500 companies they studied, those with the most women in the senior management team had more than a 30% higher return on equities (ROE). With their collaborative management style, emotional intelligence, higher education levels, and purchasing power, women are positioned to play a major role in management.
7. It Will Pay to Save the Planet
The US Conference of Mayors reports there are more than 750,000 green jobs currently in the US, and that green-jobs growth could account for up to 10% of all job growth over the next 30 years.
8. When Gen X Runs the Show
A managing partner at Global Lead (consulting firm to companies like PepsiCo) anticipates that by 2019 the Gen Xers will be in charge in the workplace and “big changes” will come. One of the essential elements for managers and leaders will be cultural sensitivity and know-how in managing and motivating multi-cultural, and often virtual, teams.
9. Yes, We’ll Make Stuff
While the US remains the world’s largest manufacturer (according to UN statistics), manufacturing employment has plummeted. Technology has boosted efficiency and workers
responded with higher productivity, which resulted in unemployment for many. But jobs involving the absolute need for quality, product safety, or keeping trade secrets will continue to make the US their home.
10. The Last Days of Cubicle Life
Here’s some good news: commuting to a cubicle 5 days a week to do mundane processing
of words or numbers will become a thing of the past, according to author and blogger Seth Godin. He says “most of the best jobs will be for people who manage customers, who organize fans, who do digital community management.” “Brilliant designers, energetic brainstormers, and rigorous lab technicians” will also be doing essential work.
Read the full article and consider the implications of this new world of work for both your career and your future job searches. Will this influence your next career move?
Adapting to change is a critical skill and one that needs to constantly be nurtured. Part of that ability is knowledge for sound decision-making. Mull over the changing nature of work and “mine” for the golden nuggets of information that can serve as guides for your career planning.
Article by, Susan Guarneri and courtesy of CareerHub.com. The Career Hub blog connects job seekers with experts in career counseling, resume writing, personal branding and recruiting.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Workplaces that work require both leaders and managers. Here’s how to tell the difference

Today’s job market may feel a bit like Dr. Dolittle’s fantastical trip to Africa, with odd creatures popping up along the journey, but the reality is the “workplace that works” hasn’t changed as much as some might think. Fantasy aside, it’s still pulled by leaders and pushed by managers. It takes both.
The “pushmi-pullyu” in Dr. Dolittle’s great adventure was a two-headed antelope who got nowhere because one head pulled and the other pushed. Both wanted to lead; neither would follow. Fun in a children’s book; disaster in the workplace.
In these tighter times, corporations can’t afford to discover on the job whether an executive will be a leader or a manager. The pressure is on for HR generalists and hiring managers to put the peg into the proper hole immediately, so the process perks from the get-go. Fortunately for jobseekers, there’s a need for both: determined to get-it-done managers and leap-to-a-new-level leaders.

Hearts and Minds
Management and leadership are not the same thing. Related, yes. Overlapping, of course. Co-dependent, certainly.
“Leadership is about capturing hearts and minds. You are a leader when people choose to follow you,” says Joel Cheesman of Cheezhead. Cheesman says people buying into an effort, a vision or an idea because of its merit is very different from buying into it because someone is “the boss” He also says, “if you have ever used the word ‘subordinate’ to describe a person you work with, you are not a leader.”
Managers are those hearts and minds the leader captures; not subordinates, but team members providing fuel and stability for the rocket. A good manager yearns to be “captured,” to take the challenging vision, rein it in to just within reason and rack up an achievement shared with the leader who then feels quite comfortable to keep on leading. No “pushmi-pullyu” organization here.
The defining line between leadership and management is the contrast between stability and vision. The manager keeps everything stable while the leader projects a new vision. Does this mean the leader is not interested in stability? Of course not. Without it, he can’t lead. Does this mean the manager just wants a quiet, stable workplace? Of course not. Without a new vision, he has nothing challenging to manage. Working together, they keep the organization grounded and moving forward, which avoids stagnation.
“Good leaders keep teams of employees motivated and engaged. Those teams make up the organization. It’s been well documented that employees leave because of bad leadership, and bad leadership affects the company’s bottom line,” points out Kevin Grossman of HR Marketer.
Know Yourself
Are you more into finding answers to existing problems? Managers do that.
Are you more into posing “what ifs?” and “what nexts?” Sounds like a leader.
Do you get into the details of “what, how, when and where?” Good management.
Do you ponder “where next?” and “why not us?” Lead on.
In the best sense, the manager tempers the leader’s flights of fancy, while the leader prevents the manager from getting just a little too comfortable.
Whether you’re walking the career path yourself right now, or, as an HR generalist, perusing the pathwalkers to find the perfect fit for a company, this is a “know thyself” moment in time.
As a jobseeker, know whether your temperament is more to manage or more to lead. Identify your own strengths. Once you do that, you can build on them. Most importantly, clearly identified strengths can be better projected . . . and that’s attractive, which can make all the difference in today’s competitive environment.
Article by, Thom and courtesy of RiseSmart.com – RiseSmart: Search Smarter. Rise Faster.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Interview With Jennifer McClure at #SHRM09

Jennifer McClure did a few minute long video interview of me at the Society for Human Resource Management 2009 annual conference in New Orleans. We talked about CollegeRecruiter.com in general; our new partnerships with America’s Job Exchange and TwitterJobSearch; our new webinars for students, career service office professionals, and employers; and my impressions of the SHRM conference.
Want to watch? Click the video below.

CollegeRecruiter.com Interview – SHRM 09 from Jennifer McClure on Vimeo.

Originally posted by Steven Rothberg

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Summer Job Search Tips for College Students

Many college students are probably looking for work this summer while they’re away from school. Due to the recession, students should expect to have competition with a limited number of jobs available per employer. That said, there are opportunities available; college students just have to be proactive in their searches for summer jobs. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

Use multiple resources in your job search – Check your career services office, the Internet, newspapers, and even your friends, family, and other acquaintances.
Develop a quality resume – Include your skills and qualifications like you would do when applying for an entry level job. In addition, provide your educational background.
Dress to impress for an interview – Having a professional appearance for an interview shows that you are serious about getting the job you want.
Summer is here, and I believe many college students want to earn some money and/or gain some valuable work experience for the future. For students who are thinking beyond the summer, they may want to consider internships to learn more about their career fields.
Check out some summer job options for college students by clicking on the source below.
Information provided by Maya Pillai.
Source
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/summer-jobs-for-college-students.html

Originally posted by William Frierson