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Posted January 28, 2011 by

Internships With the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

There are countless celebrities who support charitable causes. There are many who throw their full support behind a single organization; however, few celebs are as personally invested in their charitable work as Michael J. Fox is. Why is he so invested? Because his life is on the line. He is suffering from Parkinson’s Disease, “a degenerative disease of the brain that often impairs motor skills, speech, and other functions.” If you’ve seen Michael J. Fox on tv lately, you’ve seen what Parkinson’s does to the human body. It’s a tragic disease that will hopefully be cured due to the work of the New York City based Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. As an accomplished actor and someone who is living with Parkinson’s, Michael J. Fox is the perfect person to lead the fight against the disease. Continue reading about Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research…
Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Helpful Hints for Interns to Land Entry Level Jobs

For college graduates with little or no work experience, internships can allow them to develop important skills that employers are looking for in new employees. An internship is like a preview of what they can expect when hired for an entry level job; it’s an opportunity to learn from inside a specific industry, and maybe even have a little fun along the way. However, to get entry level jobs after they graduate from college, interns must meet certain expectations of potential employers.

Here are some helpful hints for interns who want to land entry level jobs:
An excellent resume is a must – Your resume should reflect who you are, and explain why you’re the ideal candidate for a certain job; make sure it has no mistakes.
Excellent communication skills – It is important to communicate both verbally and in written form effectively because you may interact with many people.
Becoming a team member – Some situations on the job may require you to work in a group. This is a chance to learn from other people and even form a bond with them.
Forming a strategic outlook – Strategy is a key to success. Interns who have a plan of action for achieving personal goals can be an asset for an employer looking to achieve company goals.
Confidence is key – If you believe in yourself to do the job, then a potential employer probably will too. Ability plus positivity will lead to success in the workplace.
College students, make the most of your internships, and prepare for a promising future in the real world.
For a full list of helpful hints for interns to get entry level jobs, see the source below.
Source
http://www.imdiversity.com/Villages/Careers/entry_level/inroads_internship_tips_1007.asp

Originally posted by William Frierson

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Forget the elevator pitch – you have 6 seconds for your personal branding statement

Article provided by Brand-Yourself.com
Everybody tells you that you have to have an effective 30-second “elevator pitch.”
They’re wrong – you don’t have anything like 30 seconds to make your first impression on a hiring manager, prospective client, or somebody you meet at a networking event. You have just a few seconds to introduce yourself and recite your personal branding statement.
THEN, if the other person is interested, you can go into your 30-second spiel, but only if they invite you to! If they’re not interested, don’t bother.
That’s why your personal branding statement is so important. When you meet somebody for the first time, they give you permission to politely introduce yourself, probably in a single sentence. You’ll know right away if the other person swallowed the bait by watching their body language and by judging their oral response. If they give you permission to say more, you can and should elaborate – but once again, you have to do that without boring your networking partner.

You can validate this for yourself. Try introducing yourself to somebody with your 30-second speech, and then try the same thing with your 6-second personal branding statement. See which one works better, and if you find that what I’ve said here is wrong, comment on this post and let everyone else know what your experience was.
Your personal branding statement is not your job title! It’s the essence of who you are, distilled to just a few words. Mine is: “I help you get found on the Internet.” That’s simple, succinct, and it’s enough of a teaser to get a response like: “Wow, tell me how you do that.” That’s your invitation to elaborate with your 30-second elevator pitch.
Think about this – if you’ve been in groups where people were developing and practicing their elevator pitches, how often were they sufficiently interesting so that you listened to the whole pitch attentively? How often were they boring, and how often did you finish listening without having the faintest idea what the person really meant?
Brevity begets precision. Stephen Hawking really has to work to communicate, yet he’s one of the most influential scientists in history. He has become a master at crafting his communications with the absolute minimum number of words simply because it takes him so long to create a simple sentence. While you won’t have that challenge, you should be inspired by his precision. You can blabber on for hours once the other person has given you sufficient permission, but until then think about Hawking when you craft your personal branding statement and your elevator pitch.
Your personal branding statement should be short enough to fit on one line on your business card. And you should use it there, in your email signature, in your blog postings or comments, as your LinkedIn Professional Headline, and anywhere else where it’s appropriate to promote yourself.
Article by, Walt Feigenson Mostly, I write about personal branding – especially how it impacts job seekers. But I also write about things I’ve seen during my career, which started with the birth of microcomputers.
Article courtesy of Brand-Yourself.com for actionable tips to put you in a position of power in the job market

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

The Art of the Elevator Speech

Today I read in a LexisNexis brief, “Psychologists, writers and seminar leaders caution before a minute is up – usually seven to 17 seconds – strangers, and that includes clients, form an opinion of us.”
Seventeen seconds. That’s it.
So, what do most of us do in those 17 seconds? I imagine there are many of these types of exchanges:
Employee enters the elevator with prestigious VP of some growing, new department. Of course, the employee has never actually spoken to the ‘up and coming’ director, despite likely each knowing vaguely who the other is.
In an effort to strike up conversation, the director casually asks, “So, what are you working on these days?”

Thinking fast, the employee responds back, “Oh. Same old stuff, but at least it’s a job, right?”
It’s easy to forget the power of first impressions, not only when networking externally, but definitely internally in our own organizations. First impressions gain you the right to advance in the relationship, and nothing paves the way for future conversations like a well delivered elevator speech.
Elevator speeches are quick – two to three sentences at the most – introductions to a product, service or project. They should open a conversation, they should be unique and genuine and they should quickly give someone a sense of who you are and what you do.
Skilled networkers and communicators keep a minimum of two elevator speeches at the ready for new introductions and depending on the situation. They also take the time to update and change their elevator speeches to ensure it is current.
Powerful elevator speeches convey the following:

  • Succinct and direct message about who you are and what you do.
  • Enthusiasm over what you’re saying.
  • Confidence in yourself and interest in the other person, regardless of whether you are meeting in person or virtually – like on a conference call.

The elevator speech is not technically complicated, it shouldn’t take hours to sit down, think, and jot down a few possibilities. What it does take is practice. Practice to yourself when driving in to the office one morning or when getting ready for a potential networking event. Practice saying it to friends, ask for feedback. Practice enough so that when the opportunity presents itself, your personal introduction rolls easily off the tongue and comes across professionally, confidently and engagingly.
How well do you sell yourself in 17 seconds?
Article by Channon C. and courtesy of WorkBloom, an employment blog incorporating a comprehensive career resources section, including the largest database of professionally written resume and cover letter samples on the Web.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Maintenance Technician Sample Job Description

Below is an example of what someone interested in applying for a job as a maintenance technician might see in a job posting
I/ Job information of maintenance technician
1. Job tile:
2. Job Code:
3. Department:
4. Report to:
5. Job purpose:
II/ Key job tasks of maintenance technician
1. Perform a wide variety of general building maintenance repairs and services.
2. Install light bulbs, doors, cabinets, paneling, formica, carpet, and bulletin boards.
3. Schedule and complete the “Preventative Maintenance Program”.
4. Coordinate special projects as directed by the Property Manager.
5. Assist in monitoring all work being performed by outside contractors.
6. Paint interior and exterior walls and cabinets; hang wallpaper and pictures; assemble furniture.
7. Set-up and install computer cables as needed; install and repair computer outlets; repair and relocate light fixtures.
Continue reading …
Sample job description courtesy of hrvinet.com

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Getting Fired Survival Guide – Overcoming the Wrongful Reasons People get Fired

Worried about layoffs, or getting fired? Learn five tips for getting back on the job market, and surviving a wrongful firing.
Dear Salary Sally,
As an aspiring fashion magazine editor, I’m not the kind of gal to call in sick. In fact, I probably qualify as a workaholic. It’s the only way to get noticed at a fashion magazine, after all. The pay is dreadfully low, so you have to be passionate and work hard if you want to succeed in the biz and earn a hefty salary.
I always come in early, am the last one to leave and work my butt off in between. In fact, it took three summers of running errands in three-inch pumps and fetching Starbucks for the higher ups before an editor noticed me and I got a real job offer. I jumped at the opportunity to work as an assistant editor and was sure I was on my way to the top.

Continue reading …
Article courtesy of PayScale.com where you can get accurate, real-time salary reports based on your job title, location, education, skills and experience.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Ways to Earn Extra Cash While Job Hunting

So, you’re looking for a job. You’re not alone, and right now it’s safe to bet that it’ll take a little longer than usual before you score the permanent job position you want. What are some ways to earn extra cash in the meantime, pay the bills and maybe have a little fun to boot?
Before you start a part-time job, make sure that you know what you’re looking for in terms of permanent work so that your side odd jobs don’t create a conflict. Balance is the key, and if you are doing side jobs to make money, make sure they fit into your larger career plan. Continue reading …
Article by, Siri Anderson and courtesy of PayScale.com where you can get accurate, real-time salary reports based on your job title, location, education, skills and experience.

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Entry Level Advertising Jobs With Agency Nil

Considering that I do this nearly every day, I see a lot of companies and a lot of jobs, but today I came across something that I’ve never seen before. It’s called Agency Nil, and it’s an full-service advertising agency, except it’s nothing like any ad agency that you’ve ever seen. They don’t have a physical location, they don’t have a salaried staff, and they don’t have set fees. It’s almost as if they don’t exist (I think that’s where the “nil” comes in), but they do. As PSFK puts it, Agency Nil “hopes to channelize the skills of experienced but laid-off talents from the advertising industry, as well as that of graduate students from advertising programs – people who just can’t seem to lay their hands on that elusive job.” In other words, they’re trying to put the glut of available talent to good use. It’s brilliant.
Read the full article
Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Entry Level Jobs in Public Relations With Racepoint Group

Want a job at Racepoint Group? Reading this post is a good start, but then what? Found Your Career our 21-day entry level job search prep course will help you land a job with them faster.
“Leverage the power of traditional and digital media relations to elevate premium and emerging technology, health and science brands” – that’s what global public relations agency Racepoint Group works hard toward on a daily basis. While their worldwide headquarters is outside of Boston, Racepoint Group also has offices in San Francisco; Washington, D.C.; a European headquarters in London; and a global network of partners and affiliates spanning four continents.
Racepoint Group’s practice areas include corporate, crisis and issues management, employee relations, financial communications, government relations, marketing communications and public affairs, while their industry expertise includes technology, health and science, social commerce, mobile and energy. And while many agencies claim to be “award-winning,” Racepoint Group really means it. In 2008 alone, they won more than 20 industry awards.
Read full article
Guest post by Heather R. Huhman. Heather is the media relations manager at a national health care professional association and entry-level careers columnist for Examiner.com.
Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A

Posted January 28, 2011 by

Entry Level Jobs With W.L. Gore & Associates

Posted on June 16, 2009
This week One Day, One Job is coming to you from the Northern woods of Michigan, which means that I have fly fishing on my mind. At least half my days up here are spent in waders–boots that go all the way up to your chest so that you can walk around in the river without getting wet–which gave me a great idea for a company to feature today. Newark, DE based W.L. Gore & Associates “is a leading manufacturer of thousands of advanced technology products for the electronics, industrial, fabrics and medical markets,” but they are most relevant to me (and probably to you too) as the company behind GORE-TEX. If you’re not familiar with it, GORE-TEX is a waterproof fabric that is breathable. That means that waders and rain jackets that are made out of GORE-TEX not only keep you dry from the water on the outside, but they also keep you from drenching yourself with sweat on the inside.
Read the full article
Thumbnail image for Willy Franzen.jpgArticle by Willy Franzen of One Day, One Internship and One Day, One Job

Originally posted by Candice A